Latest Headlines
0

LULAC Christmas party, early 1960′s

 xmas1 xmas2

xmas3

xmas4 xmas5 xmas6

xmas7

Women’s History Wednesday:

As part of its project to document the history of Iowa Latinas and their families, the Iowa Women’s Archives preserves and makes accessible the records of the LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) Council 10 of Davenport, Iowa.

Mexicans arrived in Iowa as early as the 1880s, and by the 1920s boxcar communities had grown up near railroad yards in towns such as Fort Madison, Davenport, and Bettendorf. During the mid-20th century, second- and third-generation Mexican Americans fought for civil rights through organizations such as Davenport’s LULAC Council 10, founded in 1959 and still going strong today.

Pictured here is a LULAC Christmas party from the early 1960s, showing a blend of traditional activities such as pinata games alongside an early example of what has become an internet phenomenon — the “Scared of Santa” photo.

Iowa Digital Library: Mujeres Latinas Digital Collection

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the LULAC Council 10 records

Iowa Women’s Archives: Mujeres Latinas Project

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Shirley Rich, casting director and UI alum

shirley1

shirley2 shirley3

I watched “The Sound of Music Live!” last night, and with musicals on the brain, I hoped we had something theatrical in the archives. And what do you know, here is Shirley Rich in her office at Rodgers & Hammerstein! She worked there as an assistant casting director from 1948 to 1951.

Rich grew up in Ottumwa, Iowa, and her parents were immigrants from Eastern Europe. In 1969, she founded Shirley Rich Casting, where she worked as a freelance casting director on such films as Taps, Saturday Night Fever, and Kramer vs. Kramer.

Shirley Rich graduated from the University of Iowa in 1944 with a bachelor of fine arts degree. Casting director in theater, television, and film, Rich worked on many productions including Fiddler on the Roof, The King and I, Three Days of the Condor, Ryan’s Hope, and The Happy Time with Eva Gabor.

She began donating her papers to the Iowa Women’s Archives in 1992 – the collection includes playbills, correspondence, professional files, and even her antique typewriter.

Guide to the Shirley Rich Papers

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Resourceful students skiing at the Pentacrest

ski1

  ski3

ski2

ski4

Women’s History Wednesday:

Iowa City isn’t exactly prime skiing country, but these resourceful UI students circa 1930s-1940s made do by repurposing the Pentacrest’s west hill in the heart of campus for their winter sports. (Not recommended these days, unless you don’t mind crash-landing into four lanes of traffic.)

Female students at the University of Iowa have a well-established history of physical fitness; the Department of Physical Education for Women, founded in 1924, was a pioneer in the field’s development of graduate study and professional training opportunities.

Iowa Digital Library: UI Physical Education for Women

Iowa Digital Library: Iowa City Town and Campus Scenes

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

 

0

LULAC News, JFK Memorial Edition

 kennedy1

kennedy2

This JFK Memorial Edition of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) National Newsletter is preserved in the records of LULAC Council 10 in the Iowa Women’s Archives. It commemorates President Kennedy and Mrs. Kennedy’s attendance at the LULAC banquet in Houston on November 21, 1963. Jacqueline Kennedy addressed the audience in Spanish on this first visit of any U.S. president to a national Latino organization.

LULAC Council 10 was one of several councils to pay tribute to the late president in this newsletter. Members of LULAC from across the country expressed their condolences in this letter:

Sorry, Mrs. Kennedy

TO: Mrs. Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy FROM: Members of Lulac

December, 1963

Dear Mrs. Kennedy:

Add to the millions of words of sorrow that have been written to you in every language on earth our humble expression of sympathy at the loss of your husband.

We will never forget John F. Kennedy, who conquered the hearts of the world and did more during his lifetime to preserve peace than any man in history.

We offer this edition of the Lulac News, official publication of the League of United Latin American Citizens, in memory of your husband, the first U.S. President ever to become an honorary member of our organization.

He was our president, our friend, and we loved him. As we shared happiness with you in Houston, Texas on November 21, 1963, so now we share your grief.

Guide to the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) Council 10 (Davenport, Iowa) Records

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Iowa’s Mesquakie tribe

mesquakie2

mesquakie3

mesquakie4

mesquakie1

 

“Soon, moreover, I was told, ‘This is your little ax,’ when a little ax was brought. I was glad. ‘This is your wood-strap,’ I was told. My mother and I would go out to cut wood; and I carried the little wood that I had cut on my back. She would strap them for me. She instructed me how to tie them up. Soon I began to go a little ways off by myself to cut wood.

“And when I was eleven years old I likewise continually watched her as she would make bags. ‘Well you try to make one,’ she said to me. She braided up one little bag for me. She instructed me how to make it. Sure enough, I nearly learned how to make it, but I made it very badly. I was again told ‘You make another.’ It was somewhat larger. And soon I knew how to make it very well… She would be very proud after I had learned to make anything. ‘There, you will make things for yourself after you care for yourself. That is why I constrain you to make anything, not to treat you meanly. I let you do things so that you may make something. If you happen to know how to make everything when you no longer see me, you will not have a hard time in any way.’”

Autobiography of a Fox Woman (1925)

Today we’re combining Women’s History Wednesday with Native American Heritage Month to feature these images of Iowa’s Mesquakie tribe, from the Iowa Women’s Archives Noble Collection, along with a published autobiography excerpt held by the State Historical Society of Iowa.

From their home in the Great Lakes region, the Mesquakie (formerly known as the Fox tribe) relocated to Iowa during the 18th and early 19th century following warfare against French fur traders and other Native American tribes. In 1845, the U.S. Government forced them out of Iowa to a reservation in Kansas, but many tribe members remained in secret, and others returned after a few years. The Iowa legislature enacted a law in 1856 allowing them to stay, and sold them back some of their land. Today the Mesquakie own 3,000 acres. [source]

Iowa Digital Library: Mesquakie photographic postcards

Iowa Digital Library: Excerpts from Autobiography of a Fox Woman

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Iowa women’s suffrage

suffrage1

suffrage2

Women’s History Wednesday!

Around this date in 1910, Iowa women were tying on their driving scarves, preparing to motor off to the women’s suffrage state convention in Corydon. While their efforts to pass statewide legislation ultimately failed, Iowa women kept rallying, and eventually received the right to vote in 1920 through the passage of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Iowa Digital Library: Suffrage documents, 1910s

IWA online exhibit: Iowa Suffrage Scrapbook

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Myrtle Aydelotte in the Army Nurse Corps

myrtle1

myrtle2

Myrtle Kitchell Aydelotte entered the Army Nurse Corps as an assistant chief nurse at the 26th General Hospital in North Africa in 1942, and in 1945 became chief nurse at the 52nd Station Hospital in Italy. At the University of Iowa, she held many positions from 1949 through 1976, including professor of nursing, Director and Dean of the College of Nursing, and director of nursing for the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

In 2008, Kathleen Krebs interviewed Aydelotte about her WWII experiences. Here are some excerpts from her summary of the interview:

“North Africa was a completely different and tremendous learning experience for Kitch and all of her unit. They landed to warmth, sunny skies, exotic aromas, ragged beggars, chaos, and the welcome availability of fresh fruit that, while it was most welcome, also made many nurses sick because it was so long since they had had any. Their bodies had become overly sensitive to citrus.”

“At Bizot, they were forced to set up their hospital in tents, some 400 of them, first housing 1000, then later 2000 beds.”

“Keeping things sterile was the number one priority and amid blowing dirt and sand, operating almost continuously with insufficient supplies, and with many infected wounds, this was a major priority and vigilance was at a maximum to prevent cross-contamination of patients. Flies were the bane of their existence and they discovered that their helmets were all-purpose vessels: they could bathe, shampoo, and launder in them.”

Myrtle K. Aydelotte donated her papers, including her memoirs, to the Iowa Women’s Archives in 1996.

Guide to the Myrtle Kitchell Aydelotte Papers

Iowa Digital Library

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Code for Coeds

code1

code2

The “Code for Coeds” is a guide to campus life that was given to incoming women students at the University of Iowa from 1937 to 1968. This 1944-45 edition is included in the Louise Goldman Papers, and Goldman edited the handbook for the University Women’s Association.

Sounds like parties at the Union were very classy, with an orchestra, program, and soft lighting. Indeed, “There’s nothing like Iowa on a Saturday night!”

Guide to the Louise Goldman Papers

[From: Louise Goldman Papers. Series 2: State University of Iowa (University of Iowa). “Code for Coeds” - 1944-1945.]

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Living Learning Community in IWA

newintown1

newintown2

On Tuesday of this week, the Iowa Women’s Archives held an event for the “New in Town” Living Learning Community. We asked the question, “What was it like to be a student at Iowa 100 years ago?” Each table represented a decade from the 1910’s all the way to the 2000’s, so the group of first year students got the chance to explore the history of student life at the University of Iowa. Scrapbooks and yearbooks were a big hit!

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

“The Newhall Girls of 1927″

tumblr_mvnpxzDCIq1smqom2o1_r3_500

tumblr_mvnpxzDCIq1smqom2o2_r2_1280

Welcome to Women’s History Wednesday!

In 1924, the Iowa High School Athletic Association decided that organized basketball was “unhealthy” for girls and announced their decision to eliminate the girls’ state championship tournament. In response, female athletes statewide took action; that included members of the Newhall team, pictured here, who rode on horseback from farm to farm to win their neighbors’ support.

Those efforts paid off big for Newhall’s players, who in 1927 won the first-ever girls state championship under the newly-founded Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. After a breathless night following the game remotely — it wasn’t broadcast on the radio, so fans gathered at a Newhall restaurant where the tournament plays were called out via a long-distance phone call — the whole town turned out the next morning to welcome their champions back home.

As one newspaper report described it, “The Newhall Girls of 1927 have given the town a place in the sun.”

Newhall items from the Rural Women Digital Collection

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.