Maximize Your Readership with Open Access | Stephan Arndt, PhD, Psychiatry & Biostatistics

During the month of Open Access week (October 23-29, 2017) we will be highlighting a number of guest posts from University of Iowa Faculty and Staff who have personal experience making their work Open Access. We appreciate their contributions.

The first guest post is by Stephan Arndt, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Professor of Biostatistics. Profile

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Stephan Arndt, Professor of Psychiatry, Professor of Biostatistics

Open access journals provide the broadest possible worldwide readership. Anyone in the world can read articles without charge. A piece published in an open access journal can cross over and breakdown financial, proprietary, and regional boundaries. Readers have access to this journal regardless of the financial resources of their region, libraries, or universities.

There are other advantages. Authors usually retain the copyright for their own work when publishing in an open access journal. This is becoming more important over time for a number of reasons. You can freely deposit your work on sites such as ResearchGate, GitHub, or other social sites since you keep the copyright. The paper belongs to you, not a publisher. This further broadens the readership, likelihood of citations, and the usefulness of the paper.

Cost can be an issue, but there are ways around that, too. Whenever possible, I write in publication costs into grants and contracts. It is often an easy sell to funders who what their supported work seen publicly. UI Libraries Open Access Fund helps, too. I have used this to help support student’s papers being published.

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Printing Changes | Fall 2017

Printing prices have been reduced, and color printing is now available on 2nd Floor in Information Commons West.

UI students will no longer receive $10/credit per semester for printing, and the price of printing has been reduced as of August 14, 2017. All UI faculty/staff/student printing will be charged to your U(niversity)-Bill.  Guests must continue to purchase printkeys in order to print.

Black and white printouts will be .03/side (was .05).
Color printouts will be .15/side (was .50).  Color prints single-sided as default setting.

A new combination color and black and white printer was installed in the West Commons this summer. If you would like to print in color, please select ITC-Color for your printer.

You can also send jobs to campus printers from your own device or home by using Web Print.

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Residents | Services for You

Hardin Library provides a variety of services to help you succeed! picture of doctor's white coat

Your department has a specialist librarian
Every department is assigned a liaison librarian, who can help you with all of your questions about the library and its resources.

Evidence-based medicine resources
Hardin subscribes to DynaMed, the Cochrane Library, JAMAevidence, BMJ Best Practice, and more.

Board review materials
Board Vitals provides question banks, with feedback, for most specialty boards.

Assistance with literature searches and systematic reviews
The UI Libraries subscribe to hundreds of online databases, focused on a variety of disciplines and implementations, from point-of-care to basic science research. Your liaison can help you choose the right databases, the right headings, and the right strategy.
Health Sciences databases
All databases

Easy access to electronic journals and an app to help you read them on mobile devices
A-Z list of electronic journals – we may have other issues in print as well!
Browzine app for iOS, Android and Kindle lets you make a customized newsstand of journals to browse, read, and monitor.

Help with your systematic review or meta-analysis
The Institute of Medicine recommends working with a librarian or other information specialist to plan out your search strategy and to peer-review the final strategy used.

Work off-campus
All of our library resources are available off-campus but require authentication with your Iowa HawkID and password. Start at Hardin’s website.

Specialized guides to resources
Find quick help for your specialty, department, with publishing or other topics.

Free interlibrary loan and document delivery
If you need an article or book that the UI Libraries doesn’t have, we can get it for you, for free. And if you need an article that we only have in print, we will scan it for you. No limits on the number of requests!

EndNote Desktop and other citation management software
EndNote is freely available for residents, and your liaison can work with you to tame your references.

Mobile resources
Hardin subscriptions provide access to many mobile apps at no charge to you including UpToDate, DynaMed Plus, ClinicalKey, BMJ Best Practice and more.

Hardin Open Workshops
Hardin librarians offer monthly workshops on topics like PubMed, EndNote, and avoiding predatory publishers. We can also bring any of our sessions to you individually or to your group.

Quick help when you need it
Whenever the library is open, we have trained reference staff available to answer questions by phone 319-335-9151, email lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or chat.

138 Health Science databases
Web of Science, Micromedex, and more!

Individual and group study/work space
Hardin has individual and small group studies, as well as study carrels and tables. The 24-hour study is available to any UI-affiliated user who registers to use it.

Books and DVDs for entertainment or families
As the 23th largest research library in the US/Canada, the UI Libraries system has 40,000+ DVDs and millions of books in many languages including Chinese, Japanese, Russian, and Arabic as well as a large collection of children’s books. Search the catalog to find them. Materials can be sent to Hardin Library for pickup.

New Resource: InCites

The UI Libraries recently obtained a license to InCites, a citation-based evaluation tool for academic and government administrators to analyze institutional productivity and benchmark output against peers in a national or international context. This resource enables rapid generation of reports, as it utilizes data from the Web of Science indexes already part of the UI Libraries collection. Below is a screenshot of the categories of reports available.

Includes people, organizations, regions, research areas, journals/books/conference proceedings, and funding agencies

 

 

InCites is available from the UI Libraries Databases A-Z list. In order to access this resource, an account is required. A previously created Web of Science account can be used or a new account can be created at the top right side of screen. If this resource is of interest to you, consider viewing additional training resources.

Please contact your subject librarian or the Hardin Library Reference desk with problems or questions.

New Journal Metric: CiteScore

Scopus, a multi-disciplinary literature database, has recently launched CiteScore metrics for titles that publish on a regular basis, such as journals and other serial publications. The CiteScore was developed as another tool for analyzing the importance of journals, similar to the Journal Impact Factor originally developed by the Institute for Scientific Information and now available in Journal Citation Reports (JCR) through the Web of Science database.

The Cite Score is calculated by dividing number of citations received in a calendar year by all items published in the journal in the preceding three years. This is similar to how the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is calculated, with a few major differences: 1.The JIF is calculated by measuring the preceding 2 years, as compared with 3 years for the CiteScore 2. CiteScore is less selective about how it determines citable items, and will include records with potential for citations (including letters to editor, news pieces) whereas the JIF only includes records that are most likely to draw citations, such as research papers 3. Access to CiteScore is freely available, whereas JCR requires a subscription. See a detailed FAQ page or more information.

In order to try out this new tool, select the Sources tab upon access of Scopus, as pictured below. If there are questions about this or other Hardin Library resources, please contact our reference desk or follow up with the appropriate subject librarian.

PubMed Food Problem: Cranberry & Cranberries | Update

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Because most plant-based foods are under “plants” instead of “food” in PubMed, articles on cranberries may not be retrieved in a search for Food.

By Eric Rumsey, Janna Lawrence and Xiaomei Gu

Part of the problem in searching for food in PubMed is that it’s often the case that there’s a fuzzy border between between food and medicine.   A food that is enjoyed for its taste and general nutritional benefits may have properties that make it therapeutic for specific health conditions. A good example of this is cranberries, and cranberry juice, which may have benefits for prevention of urinary tract infections.

As with most plant-based foods, in MeSH indexing, cranberry is in the Plants explosion, and it’s not in the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion. Fortunately, most articles on cranberries and cranberry juice are assigned some Diet, Food, and Nutrition indexing terms so that they are retrieved in searches for the explosion. For instance, articles on cranberry juice are often under Beverages, and some articles on cranberries are under Fruit or Dietary supplements. However, there is still a significant number of relevant articles on the subject that are missed.

To show examples of cranberry-related articles that are not retrieved by the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion, we searched for cranberry or cranberries in the article title, limited to human, and retrieved 391 articles. We then combined this with the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion. This retrieved 269 articles — 69% of the cranberry/cranberries articles, which is a fairly good retrieval. But still, it’s certainly notable that there are 122 articles that are not retrieved, many of which appear to be very much on target, that don’t contain any Diet, Food, and Nutrition MeSH terms. Here are some examples:

As we mentioned above, plant-based foods are tricky to search in PubMed because the name of the food plant is usually only in Plants, and not in any FDN explosion. The six articles above are all indexed under Vaccinium macrocarpon, the taxonomic name of cranberry, which is in the Plants explosion. So if you were searching for articles on urinary tract infections and plant-based foods, a strategy that would retrieve these articles would be to combine Urinary Tract Infections AND Plants.

The image at the top of the article is original.

PubMed Food Problem: Cruciferous Vegetables

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To do a PubMed search for cruciferous vegetables that includes such species as Radish and Arugula, each species must be done separately.

By Eric Rumsey, Janna Lawrence and Xiaomei Gu

In order to do successful searches for cruciferous vegetables in PubMed, it helps to know exactly what “cruciferous” means, which makes it easier to understand what vegetables are considered “cruciferous” and the botanical relationships among them. We have discussed these topics in a companion article.

In general, cruciferous vegetables are considered to be any plants in the family Brassicaceae that are edible. Most of these, especially the more popular ones (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts) are in the genus Brassica. A few others are in other genera in the family, the most notable being Radish (Raphanus), Daikon (Raphanus), Arugula (Eruca), Horseradish (Armoracia), White mustard (Sinapis), Garden cress (Lepidium) and Wasabi (Wasabia). With most edible members of the family Brassicaceae being in the genus Brassica, then, searching for that genus works well for most cruciferous vegetables. But without including the MeSH terms for all of the other edible genera in the family, there is no easy way to do a comprehensive search for them as a group.

With edible species in several genera in the Brassicaceae family, it might seem like a way to include all of them would be to search for the family name, since it’s an explosion that contains all of the genera in the family. We have seen this done by MeSH indexers in some cases, but it has problems. For one thing, the family is very large, containing 372 genera, so searching for the family name can retrieve many inappropriate citations. This is especially a problem because one of the genera in the family is Arabidopsis, a very commonly used research subject in plant genetics, having nothing at all to do with nutrition. Arabidopsis is something like the Drosophila of the plant world. So of course searching for the exploded MeSH term Brassicaceae gets a flood of articles on Arabidopsis; approximately 80% of all articles retrieved from this search are indexed to the narrower term Arabidopsis.

We found another problem in how cruciferous vegetables are treated in PubMed indexing when we looked at sample of 30 articles with “cruciferous” in the title.  Twenty-eight of the 30 articles actually had the phrase “cruciferous vegetables” in the title, but  in about ⅓ of the 30 articles, there was no indexing term at all correlated with the word “cruciferous,” and the indexing term used was just “vegetables,” ignoring the word “cruciferous.” Another problem we found in this sample is that, of the articles that had an indexing term correlated with “cruciferous,” the term that was usually used was the family name, Brassicaceae, which retrieves many non-food-related citations, as discussed above.

Suggestions for improving indexing of cruciferous foods

Because there is currently no way to search for cruciferous foods as a group, we would suggest that NLM should add a new MeSH term <cruciferous foods>. This would not only put all of these foods under one term, it would also provide a term to use for articles that use the term itself in the title or abstract.

Image at top of article is from Wikipedia.