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Worldwide Use of Iowa Research Online (IRO)

The publications in Iowa Research Online (IRO) are very widely used. From July 2014–June 2015, the items were downloaded more than 1.5 million times!

This map shows the downloads of content from IRO during the last fiscal year. Adjust the map in the window below to see more countries. Move your cursor over the map to see the counts from each country. You can also see a large version of the map.

If you want to include your scholarship in IRO to increase its global reach, contact you subject specialist at the University Libraries.

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Exam Master Online Content Update on August 17, 2015

A new content update is planned for Exam Master Onine on August 17, 2015. Please see below for a brief summary of materials impacted and explanations from Exam Master®. Questions? Comments? Email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or call (319) 335-9151.

USMLE Step 1

  • Removing: Versions 1, 2 & 3 of Practice Exams
  • Adding: Version 4 of Practice Exam, which incorporates the best questions from previous versions, along with new questions.

Certification Review

  • Removing: Surgery (ACS) will be retired because Exam Master® has not been able acquire new content.
  • Adding: Urgent Care, developed in partnership with the American Board of Urgent Care Medicine, (ABUCM)
  • Updating: Family Medicine has been updated after a thorough review.

Physician Assistant (PA) Resources

  • Removing: the Clinical Modules for PA’s and the Medical Subjects Modules for PA’s
  • Adding: CRS (Certification Review Series) and Biomedical Subjects and Clinical Subjects outlines; also adding USMLE Step 1 Board Review & Medical Subjects, USMLE Step 2 and Step 3 Medical Subject Outlines

NAPLEX

  • Removing: Supplemental Medical Sciences for Pharmacy
  • Adding: Biomedical Subjects and Clinical Subjects outlines.

Exam Master Online can be found it on the Health Sciences Databases A-Z list on the home page for Hardin Library.

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ClinicalKey, Other Elsevier Resources Undergoing Maintenance, Saturday, August 1

All Elsevier products will be undergoing maintenance on Saturday, August 1, beginning at 5:00 pm central time, until approximately 10:30 pm.

ClinicalKey will still be available, but individual log-ins, used to view PDFs and save content within ClinicalKey, will be unavailable.  HTML views of chapters and articles will still be available.

All other Elsevier resources, including journals and books accessed through the ScienceDirect platform and EMBASE, are expected to be unavailable.

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New Resource : Pharmaceutical Substances

The library now has a subscription to Pharmaceutical Substances, a reference resource with more than 2,600 active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) of interest to the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. It is updated biannually.

The default search box allows keyword searching. After clicking on the Advanced Search button, users can draw a structure or reaction on the right side of screen and search by structure or reaction. To return to keyword searching from the advance search page, simply type in the keyword in the search box before the search button on the right top of the screen.

Pharmaceutical Substances is listed on the Health Sciences Resources A-Z page. We’re very interested in hearing how you like this new database. Email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or call (319) 335-9151. Don’t forget you can also find SciFinder on the A-Z page, which is a more comprehensive database of literature, substances and reactions in chemistry and related sciences.thieme

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Patent Searching in Scopus

Similar to Web of Science, Scopus is a multidisciplinary database that covers journal articles, conference proceedings, and books and allows citation analysis. A lesser known feature in Scopus is patent searching. There are about 23 million patent records in Scopus, derived from five patent offices, including the US Patent & Trademark Office, the European Patent Office, the Japan Patent Office, the World Intellectual Property Organization and the UK Intellectual Property Office*.

For patent searching, conduct your search as you normally would either using the default Document Search or using other options such as Author Search and Affiliation Search. On the results page, you will see the number (7,655 in the example showed in the screenshot) of Documents Results listed on the upper left side of the screen. To the right of this number, there is a link that says “View 358 patent results”. This link will take you to a separate page with patents listed. Note that the patent link will only appear if there are patent results that matched your search terms.

scopus patent
To know more about patents and how to find them, visit the Patent guide created at the Lichtenberger Engineering Library. You can also take a patent class at Hardin Library; for more information, visit the Hardin Open Workshops website at http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/.

*Source: Elsevier. Scopus Facts & Figure Factsheet. http://www.elsevier.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/148714/3859-Scopus-Facts-and-Figures-LO.pdf  Accessed April 28, 2015.

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Embase: Tips For Navigating A Powerful & Tricky Resource

By Eric Rumsey
Embase, which we described in an earlier article, is a powerful biomedical database which is comparable to PubMed. Unfortunately, the interface for Embase is rather difficult to navigate, especially for new users. We have created two resources for beginning users:

A 2-page handout: Basic Searching in EMBASE

A slide set that shows the first steps in doing a successful search in Embase: Embase: Use Quick Search To Do Mapping!

A slide set that shows the steps to do a simple search on heart attack and aspirin: Embase Searching- A Basic Tutorial

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New Resource: Cochrane Clinical Answers

The library now has a subscription to Cochrane Clinical Answers (CCAs). CCAs are derived from Cochrane systematic reviews and provide clinicians with short answers to clinical questions at the point of care.The website allows browsing by disease categories and keyword searching. Each CCA contains a clinical question, a short answer, and links to relevant Cochrane systematic reviews. See the screenshot below for an example.  Note that CCAs are still in development, and there is not a CCA for every Cochrane systematic review.

Similar resources to be used by clinician at the point of care include DynaMed and UpToDate, both of which can be found at the Health Sciences Resources A-Z page.

Questions? Comments? Email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or call (319) 335-9151.

CCA screenshot

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CINAHL, DynaMed and Other EBSCO Databases Available Off-Campus

EBSCO databases including CINAHL and DynaMed should now be working from off-campus.

If you have questions or comments, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

 

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Searching Nutrition In PubMed & Embase: The Winner Is…

By Eric Rumsey and Janna Lawrence

As we’ve discussed, the big problem in searching for food-diet-nutrition subjects in PubMed is that the subjects are not together in a convenient bundle, as most subject groupings are in PubMed. To get a list of articles that includes food, diet and nutrition, it’s necessary to search each of these areas separately and then bundle them together into one search set.

When we first wrote about the difficulty of searching food-diet-nutrition in PubMed in 2013, we stated clearly that much of problem is caused by the fragmentation of the the relevant MeSH terms. So, jump forward a year. About two months ago, our library got institutional access to Embase.com, sometimes called the “European MEDLINE.” Embase includes all of the articles in MEDLINE, as well as many other articles, and uses its own subject heading system. Because we’ve long been aware that food-diet-nutrition subjects are generally given more attention in Europe than in the US, we thought that the subject might get better treatment in Embase than it does in PubMed. We weren’t disappointed…

A Nutrition explosion that includes Food and Diet

Embase uses explosions to bundle related subjects together, much like PubMed, and, as we were hoping, it does indeed bring food, diet and nutrition subjects together in a convenient bundle – Nutrition. So in the search box, just type in Nutrition/exp to get the nutrition explosion, that will retrieve everything on food and diet as well as nutrition. This is a great advance over PubMed. It becomes easy to combine a subject of interest with food-diet-nutrition, in one simple step. For example, using Embase.com format:

‘Heart disease’/exp AND Nutrition/exp
Neoplasm/exp AND Nutrition/exp
‘Mental function’/exp AND Nutrition/exp

To do equivalent searches in PubMed, it’s necessary to do a hedge/filter search, such we have developed, or to search food-diet-nutrition terms separately and combine these with the subject of interest.

Better treatment of “Food” in Embase

Certainly having the inclusive food-diet-nutrition explosion is the biggest advantage in Embase. But there are other problems in PubMed, especially in the way the Food explosion is treated. In both Embase and PubMed, Food is the largest food-diet-nutrition explosion. There are several difficulties with this explosion in PubMed. An overall complication is that Food and Beverages have a confusing relationship. They are together in one explosion Food and beverages, which is made up of two separate explosions, one for each of the terms. If the user knows enough to search Food and beverages, he/she will get both terms. But if the user searches “Food,” the search will not include beverages. In Embase, beverage is an explosion that’s included in the food explosion, so searching “food” will retrieve articles on beverages.

Several other problems with the Food explosion in PubMed are caused by a lack of detail, in comparison with Embase. Some examples:

  • In PubMed, Fruit is not an explosion, although there are individual fruits included in the Plants explosion, usually under their Latin plant name. In Embase, the fruit explosion has 43 terms under it, 6 of which are themselves explosions.
  • In PubMed, Spices is an explosion with one term under it – Black Pepper. In Embase, the spice explosion has 31 terms listed under it, 4 of which are themselves explosions.
  • In PubMed, specific kinds of red meat, e.g. beef and pork, do not have their own MeSH terms; instead, they’re indexed under the general term Meat. In Embase, the meat explosion contains a red meat explosion, which has 7 terms, including beef and pork.

Related to the lack of detail in the Food explosion in PubMed is that many foods, especially plant-based foods, are not retrieved in a search for “food” because they don’t have specific terms in the Food explosion. We have written some “case studies” of this on chocolate, cranberries, and olive oil, all of which are in the Food explosion in Embase, but not in PubMed. We have also written an article on red meat being difficult to search in PubMed because there is no MeSH term for it; as mentioned above, Embase does have a term for it.

Looking at articles in Embase and PubMed that mention specific foods in the article abstract, it’s almost always the case that Embase’s detailed indexing will include descriptor terms for the specific foods, and PubMed usually will not. Comparison of article indexing is easy to do because Embase provides a “Source” filter, that makes it possible to limit to articles that are included in both Embase and PubMed. Each of the articles retrieved using this filter has a direct link to the citation in PubMed.

PubMed Advantages

The biggest advantage of PubMed, of course, is that it’s free to world. Embase, on the other hand, is an Elsevier product and is only available at institutions that have a subscription.

Another PubMed advantage is its simple Google-like interface, which is certainly more comfortable to most people. Embase uses an older style of interface that may appeal to librarians more than to most users. For anyone with a serious interest in food-diet-nutrition, though, we would say it’s definitely worth learning.

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New Resource: Board Vitals

Board Vitals Logo

Board Vitals is an exam preparation database. At this time, Hardin Library has subscribed to question banks for: Child Psychiatry MOC, Dermatology, Dermatology MOC, Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medicine ConCert Exam MOC, Family Medicine MOC (MC-FP Examination), Family Medicine Shelf Exam, Internal Medicine Shelf Exam, Neurology, Neurology MOC, Neurology Shelf Exam, OB-GYN MOC, OB-GYN Shelf Exam, OB-GYN, Otolaryngology MOC, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pathology MOC, Psychiatry, Psychiatry Shelf Exam, Psychiatry Vignettes, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Radiology CORE, Radiology Certifying Exam, Radiology MOC, Surgery MOC, and Surgery Shelf Exam.

According to Board Vitals: “we provide up-to-date explanations from the literature with our answers and give you detailed feedback and assessment of your progress broken down by subject areas. With each question you can see how you compare to your peers, and gauge the difficulty of the question by what percentage of your peers answered it correctly or chose the same option you did.”

To use Board Vitals, you will need to:

  1. Access Board Vitals via the health science resources page: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/eresources/
  2. Click the link that says “If Signing Up for the First Time, Click Here.”
  3. Fill out the form and you are ready to go.

You will have the option to select an area and then build a custom exam. The number of questions available is listed, and you can choose between a review or a timed exam. The reviewed exam provides explanations whether you answer the question or not. It will also show you how many exam takers correctly answered the question.

You can choose to answer between 1-50 questions, and, once you’ve used the resource, you’ll notice that you can choose to answer new questions, all questions, or incorrect questions.

If you are looking for other content, remember that Board Vitals is only one of the resources that Hardin Library provides for exam preparation. To find out about other resources, check out our Board Review Materials LibGuide http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/boardreview

As always, please feel free to contact us http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/contact if you have any questions, comments, or concerns.