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US Lags Behind The World In Plant-Based Food Research

By Xiaomei Gu, Eric Rumsey and Janna Lawrence

In our explorations of plant-base foods (PBFs) in PubMed, it’s often striking that there are many excellent articles from non-US countries. So we did a survey in PubMed to measure different countries’ authorship of articles on PBFs, and we found that, indeed, several countries have a much higher proportion of their total articles on PBFs than the US.

The charts below show our data for all PBFs and for four specific foods or food groups. The charts are based on the percentage of articles from each county, not the total number of articles. So even though the total number of articles on PBFs by US authors may be higher than other countries, the proportion of articles on PBFs is substantially lower. [The charts are from a poster presented at MLA in 2016. For more details on our survey methods, see the poster.]

hardinlibPosterPBFcountriesLeadPubMed search strategy used to find plant-based foods in chart above is described here.

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hardinlibPosterPBFcountriesCabbage

hardinlibPosterPBFcountriesNuts

hardinlibPosterPBFcountriesFruit

hardinlibPosterPBFcountriesSpices

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Nuts as a Healthy Food: How to Search in PubMed

By Eric Rumsey, Janna Lawrence and Xiaomei Gu

This article is based on a poster presented at the Medical Library Association annual meeting, Toronto, May 2016.

Introduction

Searching for nuts as food is difficult. As with most plant-based foods, MeSH terms for specific types of nuts are in the Plants explosion instead of in the food explosion. Nuts are especially tricky because the MeSH term Nuts is not an explosion, and most articles on specific types of nuts are not indexed to the term Nuts. So it’s necessary to search for specific nuts to retrieve articles on them.

A caveat—As with nutrition topics in general, and plant-based foods in particular, searching in PubMed is complicated, largely because many plant-based substances are used as foods and also as medicines or experimental organisms. A list of articles on specific nut types is likely to contain some articles that are not food-related.

Searching for Nut Types

The general idea of searching for specific types of nuts is simple: Do an OR search that includes the common name and botanical name. In most cases, articles on a specific nut type will be indexed under the botanical name, but using the common name is always a good idea. See the example below for searching walnuts.

walnut [tiab] OR walnuts [tiab] OR juglans [MeSH]

It is necessary to restrict the search for the common names to the title and abstract [tiab] fields because there are many streets in the Address field that are named after nuts (e.g., 975 Walnut St.).

hardinlibPosterNutsAlmonds

Image 1. Almonds

 

hardinlibPosterNutsWalnuts

Image 2. Walnuts

 

hardinlibPosterNutsHazelnuts

Image 3. Hazelnuts

 

hardinlibPosterNutsCashews

Image 4. Cashews

 

hardinlibPosterNutsPecans

Image 5. Pecans

 

hardinlibPosterNutsBrazils

Image 6. Brazil Nuts

 

Peanuts Are Different!

hardinlibPosterNutsPeanuts

Image 7. Peanuts

Peanuts are a special case. Unlike the other nuts here, they grow on herbaceous plants instead of on trees and, as members of the bean family, they are nutritionally more closely related to beans than to other nuts. There is also a separate MeSH term, Peanut Hypersensitivity, dealing with peanut allergies.

Because peanuts are commonly used as experimental plants, many of the articles about them are not related to nutrition. To  focus on nutritional aspects, we suggest incorporating the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion into the search:

(peanut [tiab] OR peanuts [tiab] OR arachis [mh])

AND Diet, Food, and Nutrition [mh]

Citations: 2932

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New Resource: The Medical Letter (site license) and its Mobile App

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences now has a site license for the Medical Letter at http://purl.lib.uiowa.edu/MedLetter.  Medical Letter can also be found on the Health Sciences Resources A-Z http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/az.php .

The Medical Letter’s home page shows the current issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics.

  • To view full text articles and to find the  Download PDF link, click on the title of the article.
  • Use the navigation links on the left side of the screen to access other contents, including previous issues, continue education (CME/CE), Drugs for Parasitic Infections, and The Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy.

Note that the library also has print copies of the Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics, Drugs for Parasitic Infections, and Handbook of Antimicrobial Therapy. Search InfoHawk Catalog  for more information.

medical letter homepage

The library’s site license also allows access to the Medial Letter mobile app.

  1. Go to http://purl.lib.uiowa.edu/MedLettermedical letter app
  2. Click the Mobile Apps link under Products on the left side of the screen.
  3. Fill in the registration form using your Iowa email to set up a password.
  4. Open the App/Play Store on your mobile device, search for “the Medical Letter” and install at no charge.
  5. Log in with the password you created earlier.

Questions? Comments? Email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or call (319) 335-9151.

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ClinicalKey available for iOS and Android mobile devices

screen shot clinicalkey mobile ClinicalKey provides access to more than 1100 medical texts published by Elsevier, articles from more than 500 journals, practice guidelines, drug information, and patient education handouts. Users must log in to (free for UI affiliates) personal accounts to download PDFs.

1. Open the App Store on your mobile device.
2. Search for “ClinicalKey” and install at no charge.
3. Once in the app, two options will appear – Click on ClinicalKey.
4. Enter your username and password used for accessing PDFs.
If you do not have a username and password yet, follow steps 5-7.
5. Go to http://purl.lib.uiowa.edu/clinicalkey
6. Click on the Register link at the top right of the screen.
7. Create a personal account using your Iowa email.
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EndNote X7 for MAC now works with Microsoft Word 2016

endnote_logoGood news!  EndNote X7 for the Mac now works with Microsoft Word 2016.  When you open the desktop version of EndNote, it should tell you that that there is an update available, but you can also select Check for Updates in the EndNote X7 dropdown menu.  EndNote Basic (the online only version) will also prompt you to install the new Cite While You Write plug-in for Word.  Whether you are using the desktop or online version, you also need to have the latest version of Word 2016  (currently version 15.18) installed.

Once Word and EndNote are both updated, the EndNote Cite While You Write tools should appear as a tab in Word. The first time you launch Word 2016 after updating EndNote, you will be asked to “grant access” to an EndNote .plist file. Simply click Grant Access; you should not be asked this again.

More information about the update, including some troubleshooting in case the tools do not automatically appear in Word, can be found at http://endnote.com/kb/138936.  More information about updating Word, with a more complete explanation about “granting access,” is at http://endnote.com/kb/138936.

If you have questions about EndNote, please contact your Library Liaison or Janna Lawrence.

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