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Workshop: Lit Searching for a Systematic Review | Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2-3pm

This class will focus on tips and techniques for carrying out a successful literature search in support of a systematic review. Topics will include techniques for developing search strategies, deciding which databases to search and how to seek out grey literature for a given topic. There will also be discussion on selecting journals for hand searching, documenting search strategies, and saving and organizing references.

NOTE: We suggest that “Nuts and Bolts of a Systematic Review” be taken before “Literature Searching for a Systematic Review.”

Tuesday, November 28, 2017 Time:2:00pm – 3:00pm  Hardin Library – Information Commons East 2nd Floor

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Meet The Expert: Jen DeBerg, Reference Services Librarian

Jen DeBerg, Reference Services Librarian

Master of Library Science, Emporia State University

picture of Jen DeBerg
Jennifer DeBerg, Reference Services Librarian

Bachelor of Science, Occupational Therapy, Elizabethtown College

Areas of expertise:

  • Adjunct Lecturer, College of Nursing
  • Health sciences literature searching
  • Systematic reviews
  • EndNote
  • Teaching and training users
  • Finding evidence-based resources
  • Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services award winner

Outside the library:
Jen lives in Iowa City with her family: husband and 2 sons, aged 12 and 9.  She enjoys music, reading, swimming, hiking, ice skating, snowboarding and watching all sports.

 

Better genetic information searching | NCBI Gene, Nucleotide Sequences & Protein | workshop Wednesday, Nov. 8, 11a-12pm

Chris Childs, instructor

Overwhelmed by the number of databases that the National Center for Biotechnology Information has to offer on nucleotide sequences, genes and proteins? Wondering which database you should always start with? Would you like to learn how to set up an NCBI account to link articles in PubMed to records in other databases? Do you know about PubMed’s Gene Sensor? Are you familiar with the concept of linear navigation? Learn all of these tips and more in this session that is designed for anyone who needs to search the NCBI databases for genetic information.

Wednesday, November 8th, 11:00am-12:00pm, East Information Commons, 2nd Floor

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

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Manage your citations effectively | EndNote Desktop Advanced workshop | Tuesday, Nov. 7, 3-4pm

For those already using Endnote, this class teaches you to maximize the tool. From exporting and importing to syncing and sharing, this class will help you manage your own information seamlessly from desktop to mobile device and on the web. You’ll also learn about the Endnote options for sharing, so you can collaborate effectively.

Tuesday, November 7
3-4pm
Information Commons East, 2nd Floor Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

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Announcing the Learning Lounge @Hardin Library

image of learning lounge in East CommonsLast spring, Dr. Wayne Johnson approached Hardin Library staff about the possibility of using library space for the small-group component of the human physiology course he teaches at the College of Dentistry. Because the classrooms in the East and West Commons were already heavily booked, we began looking at other space. The East Commons on the 2nd floor had been recently refurbished to include cabana-like group studies and restaurant-style booths, each seating about 6 people.  Dr. Johnson saw the possibility of using this space for this class, which consists of 4 small groups meeting simultaneously. All that was needed was screen-sharing technology and more white boards, and the Learning Lounge was created.

The Learning Lounge is straight ahead when you enter the East Commons, and consists of the two group studies and the two booths in front of the studies. Each study or booth has a 55” monitor equipped with Mersive Solstice software that allows users to wirelessly share the screens of their laptops or mobile devices by connecting using either a browser or the free Solstice app.  Directions for connecting are shown on the monitors.  White boards are also available in the Learning Lounge.

The Learning Lounge can be reserved at through the Classroom Reservation Form at http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/classroom/. The two group studies can also be reserved independently through the Group Study Reservation form at http://uiowa.libcal.com/booking/hardin-groupstudy, where they are listed as East Commons-1 and East Commons-2.  (Reserving the Learning Lounge automatically reserves the group studies.)

Want more information?  Contact Janna Lawrence, Hardin Deputy Director, at 319-335-9870 or janna-lawrence@uiowa.edu, or Matt Regan, Clinical Education Librarian, at 319-384-1407 or matthew-regan@uiowa.edu

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Test Tube Babies During America’s Baby Boom : Artificial Insemination in Law & Medicine | HOM November Lecture | Thurs. Nov. 16, 6-7pm

Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD. Professor of Law, Northeastern University

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society and The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences John Martin Rare Book Room invite you to hear Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD., Professor of Law, Northeastern University for the November, 2017 lecture.

Thursday, November 16, 2017 6:00-7:00

Medical Education and Research Facility (MERF)  Room 2117
375 Newton Road, Iowa City

In 1978, Louise Brown, the first baby born as a result of in vitro fertilization, was heralded around the world as the first “test tube” baby. But for decades, doctors had been quietly practicing artificial insemination, the first successful assisted reproductive technology (ART). As the post-WWII baby boom swelled the numbers of would-be parents seeking fertility treatment, the challenges posed by the use of donor gametes spilled into courtrooms and popular culture. Worries about this new form of family formation shaped medical practice and ultimately, the law.

picture of babies falling from test tube into filePlease consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

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Paracelsus, father of toxicology | October 2017 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

PARACELSUS (1493-1541). Opera, Bücher und Schrifften. Strasbourg: In Verlegung L. Zetzners seligen Erben, 1616.

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Portrait of Paracelsus, painter unknown

Philippus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim is universally known as Paracelsus. He was born in Switzerland and educated at Basel. Paracelsus unorthodox ideas and teachings put him in conflict with the orthodox establishment of his revolutionary time and he spent most of his life wandering through Europe as an itinerant physician, chemist, theologian, and philosopher.

Paracelsus ideas were still bound up in alchemy and astrology, and his writings imbued with a mysticism which makes them difficult to interpret.  Paracelsus was usually in advance of his time in the area of practical medicine and attracted many followers. First, he applied chemical techniques to pharmacy and therapeutics. Secondly, in his medical teaching he abandoned the ruling system of humours. Paracelsus believed illness was from a body being attacked by outside agents. He administered specific medications for specific illnesses instead of common cure-alls.

Paracelsus influence on the Sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries was profound and the work of Helmont is unthinkable without him.  Paracelsus is also credited with creating the terms chemistry, gas, and alcohol.

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Hardin Library’s copy

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.