Frankenstein | John Martin Rare Book Room Annual Open House | Thurs. March 22, 5-8pm

John Martin Rare Book Room Open House
Thursday, March 22
5-8pm

Now in the 200th year since its publication, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus continues to raise questions about humanity, scientific ethics, and the place of the monster in our imaginations.

Frontispiece to Frankenstein 1831
Steel engraving by Theodore Von Holst appears as frontispiece to Frankenstein, 1831 ed.
This event features books and manuscripts from the John Martin Rare Book Room and Main Library’s Special Collections, which together trace the creation of the novel, and the scientific world that it grew out of.

picture of Marquis Berrey in a classroom

Ancient Surgery in Early Modern Italy | History of Medicine Lecture | January 25, 5:30pm

image of Marquis Berrey and old book with information about presentation

 

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invites you to a lecture by  Marquis Berrey, Associate Professor in Classics, University of Iowa

Ancient Surgery in Early Modern Italy: Celsus, Benivieni, Morgagni
Thursday, January 25, 2018, 5:30-6:30
MERF Room 2117 (Medical Education and Research Facility)

European medical professionals from the 15th through the early 19th centuries treated the De Medicina “On Medicine” by the ancient Roman encyclopediast Aulus Cornelius Celsus (fl. 30 CE) as a standard medical reference equivalent to the works of Hippocrates and Galen. Celsus’ stylish Latin text with its detailed clinical and surgical instructions found wide readership over the early modern period among notable practitioners, from the Florentine surgeon Antonio Benivieni (1443-1502) to Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), professor of anatomy at Padua. This lecture considers how Benivieni and Morgagni put Celsus’ De Medicina to work in medical ethics, in identifications of syphilis, and in specific surgical interventions.

Marquis Berrey bio

Please consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

picture of babies falling from test tube into file

Test Tube Babies During America’s Baby Boom : Artificial Insemination in Law & Medicine | HOM November Lecture | Thurs. Nov. 16, 6-7pm

Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD. Professor of Law, Northeastern University

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society and The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences John Martin Rare Book Room invite you to hear Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD., Professor of Law, Northeastern University for the November, 2017 lecture.

Thursday, November 16, 2017 6:00-7:00

Medical Education and Research Facility (MERF)  Room 2117
375 Newton Road, Iowa City

In 1978, Louise Brown, the first baby born as a result of in vitro fertilization, was heralded around the world as the first “test tube” baby. But for decades, doctors had been quietly practicing artificial insemination, the first successful assisted reproductive technology (ART). As the post-WWII baby boom swelled the numbers of would-be parents seeking fertility treatment, the challenges posed by the use of donor gametes spilled into courtrooms and popular culture. Worries about this new form of family formation shaped medical practice and ultimately, the law.

picture of babies falling from test tube into filePlease consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

painting of Paracelsus

Paracelsus, father of toxicology | October 2017 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

PARACELSUS (1493-1541). Opera, Bücher und Schrifften. Strasbourg: In Verlegung L. Zetzners seligen Erben, 1616.

painting of Paracelsus
Portrait of Paracelsus, painter unknown

Philippus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim is universally known as Paracelsus. He was born in Switzerland and educated at Basel. Paracelsus unorthodox ideas and teachings put him in conflict with the orthodox establishment of his revolutionary time and he spent most of his life wandering through Europe as an itinerant physician, chemist, theologian, and philosopher.

Paracelsus ideas were still bound up in alchemy and astrology, and his writings imbued with a mysticism which makes them difficult to interpret.  Paracelsus was usually in advance of his time in the area of practical medicine and attracted many followers. First, he applied chemical techniques to pharmacy and therapeutics. Secondly, in his medical teaching he abandoned the ruling system of humours. Paracelsus believed illness was from a body being attacked by outside agents. He administered specific medications for specific illnesses instead of common cure-alls.

Paracelsus influence on the Sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries was profound and the work of Helmont is unthinkable without him.  Paracelsus is also credited with creating the terms chemistry, gas, and alcohol.

picture of book
Hardin Library’s copy

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

soldiers in Queensland

World War I – Medical Issues at Home and in the Field | History of Medicine Lecture | Thurs. Oct. 26, 5:30-7pm

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invites you to hear:

World War I—Medical Issues at Home and in the Field

Thursday, October 26, 2017 5:30-7:00 p.m.
2117 MERF (Medical Education and Research Facility)

Panel Discussion:

  • Memoirs from the Font
    Dr. Charles Hawtrey, Professor Emeritus, Department of Urology, University of Iowa
  • Gas Warfare
    Dr. Dan Bonthius, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa
  • Shell Shock
    Janet Schlapkohl, Managing Director, Combined Efforts: Celebrating Artists, Changing Perceptions
  • Manufacture of Vitamins and Supplements
    Amanda Bloomer, Wellness Staff, New Pioneer Coop
  • Memoirs and Stories From the Audience
    Dr. Charles Hawtrey 
Nurses and Doctor attending to WWI soldier. Image from Wellcome Library.

Please consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.