Frankenstein | John Martin Rare Book Room Annual Open House | Thurs. March 22, 5-8pm

John Martin Rare Book Room Open House
Thursday, March 22
5-8pm

Now in the 200th year since its publication, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus continues to raise questions about humanity, scientific ethics, and the place of the monster in our imaginations.

Frontispiece to Frankenstein 1831
Steel engraving by Theodore Von Holst appears as frontispiece to Frankenstein, 1831 ed.
This event features books and manuscripts from the John Martin Rare Book Room and Main Library’s Special Collections, which together trace the creation of the novel, and the scientific world that it grew out of.

picture of babies falling from test tube into file

Test Tube Babies During America’s Baby Boom : Artificial Insemination in Law & Medicine | HOM November Lecture | Thurs. Nov. 16, 6-7pm

Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD. Professor of Law, Northeastern University

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society and The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences John Martin Rare Book Room invite you to hear Kara Swanson, J.D., PhD., Professor of Law, Northeastern University for the November, 2017 lecture.

Thursday, November 16, 2017 6:00-7:00

Medical Education and Research Facility (MERF)  Room 2117
375 Newton Road, Iowa City

In 1978, Louise Brown, the first baby born as a result of in vitro fertilization, was heralded around the world as the first “test tube” baby. But for decades, doctors had been quietly practicing artificial insemination, the first successful assisted reproductive technology (ART). As the post-WWII baby boom swelled the numbers of would-be parents seeking fertility treatment, the challenges posed by the use of donor gametes spilled into courtrooms and popular culture. Worries about this new form of family formation shaped medical practice and ultimately, the law.

picture of babies falling from test tube into filePlease consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

Physicians as Collectors | History of Medicine Lecture | Thursday, Sept. 28, 5:30pm | Hardin Library

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences and the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invite you to a lecture by Elizabeth Yale,  PhD, History of Science, Harvard University.

Elizabeth Yale, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor, UI Center for the Book

Bring out Your Dead (Papers)! Early Modern Medical Practitioners as Archivists and Collectors

Thursday, September 28
5:30-6:30pm
401 Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

 

Early modern physicians built their libraries as dynamic, interactive information resources. They constructed their collections over many years, buying and inheriting books old and new. Alongside their books, they generated and passed on valuable caches of written records, including correspondence and medical casebooks.

This talk considers physicians as collectors of books and papers: what can their use of these materials tell us not only about their medical practices, but also their varied pursuits as naturalists, editors and authors, scientific reformers, and museum founders.

Please consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Donate online to Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

University of Iowa History of Medicine Society calendar 2017/2018

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

total exclipse graphic from Nasa

Solar Eclipse Viewing @Sciences Library (East Campus) | 11:30am-3pm, Monday, August 21

total exclipse graphic from NasaOn Monday, August 21st 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible in the United States. During this rare event, the moon passes between the Sun and Earth, and therefore blocks the light of the Sun. In Iowa City, we can observe a partial eclipse. The Sun will be 92% obscured by the Moon. The partial eclipse will begin at 11:46 am CDT, reach maximum eclipse at 1:12 pm, and end at 2:37 pm.

On campus from 11:30 AM to 3:00 PM, the Department of Physics & Astronomy, the Sciences Library, and the Museum of Natural History are pleased to offer two eclipse viewing stations: On the Pentacrest and in the courtyard outside the Sciences Library. Each viewing station will be equipped with telescopes and free eclipse glasses. Faculty, staff, and student experts will be on hand to demonstrate safe viewing techniques and answer questions.

In case of cloudy skies or if you want to see a total solar eclipse, you can watch live video streams of the eclipse at https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive. Or stop by the Sciences Library to watch on the big screen!

Check out the LibGuide for this event  Map to Sciences Library

Location: Science Library Courtyard: 120 E Iowa Ave
When: Monday, August 21st 2017
Times: 11:30 AM – 3:00 PM