Art Library Collection Moved to Main Library

The Art Library collection has made its journey across the river from Art Building West to the Main Library. When we learned that Art Building West would not be ready and approved for re-occupancy when previously anticipated (by January, 2010), we decided to move the collection to the Main Library to improve accessibility. Previously anyone wanting materials from the art collection had to make a formal request for the materials to be retrieved. Now students, faculty and other library users will have direct access to the collection.

Art Library and Music Library staff have co-located in room 2006, which is adjacent to the both collections. Library users will also find current journal issues, media and course reserves in Art and Music here.

To reach a member of the Art Library staff, please email (lib-art@uiowa.edu) or call 319-335-3086. To reach a member of the Music Library staff, please email (lib-music@uiowa.edu) or call 319- 335-3086.

Computing Services in Main Library

The Main Library ITC, located on the east side of the 2nd floor, is the largest facility on campus with over 200 desktop computers (both PC and Macintosh platforms). Laptop computers are available for check out at the Information/Reference Desk on the first floor of the Main Library. They may be used anywhere in the Main Library.

In the Main Library, printing problems (paper, toner, jams) will be handled by staff at the Information/Reference desk. Technical support will be handled by ITS Help Desk via phone, email, live chat or in person on the second floor of University Capitol Centre, one block away.

Welcome to the Iowa City Book Festival

Writing and reading are at the center of what we do at the University of Iowa and an essential component of Iowa City’s designation as a UNESCO City of Literature, yet a book festival has been missing from our cultural landscape. The University of Iowa Libraries, in partnership with the University of Iowa Press, is very pleased to launch a campus and community event that will fill the void — The Iowa City Book Festival.

The Iowa City Book Festival is a day-long celebration of books, reading and writing. We envision it as an event that could become an annual tradition in our city. This first year will commemorate of the acquisition of the University of Iowa Libraries’ 5 millionth volume and the 40th anniversary of the University of Iowa Press.

Please spend the day visiting the local and regional booksellers, who have set up shop in Gibson Square Park. You may want to sit in the shade and peruse your purchases and enjoy some live music. We also have a full schedule of readings, discussions and workshops that I’m sure you’ll find informative and entertaining.

Before you leave, please tell us what you think. You can find surveys in all of the sessions, at the Information Booth in Gibson Square and on the Festival website (www.iowacitybookfestival.org).

‘Animal, Vegetable, Miracle’ selected for One Community, One Book

“Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year in Food Life” by Barbara Kingsolver, with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver, is the 2009 selection for “One Community, One Book.”

The project promotes insights on human rights in the United States and across the globe and is coordinated by the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights (UICHR) in conjunction with other sponsoring organizations from Johnson County and the UI.

The goal of the project is to encourage people to read and discuss the selected book in order to develop a greater community awareness of human rights issues locally, nationally and internationally.

“Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” tells the story of how Kingsolver and her family for one year deliberately ate food produced in the place where they live. Kingsolver wrote the central narrative, and her husband, Steven Hopp, wrote in-depth sidebars about various aspects of food-production science and industry. Kingsolver’s 19-year-old daughter, Camille, wrote brief essays on the local-food project, plus nutritional information, meal plans and recipes.

“Although this does not sound like our typical human-rights themed book, this book acknowledges that there is a right to adequate food for all humans, that not everyone can afford to make these kinds of food choices and that climate change can diminish the ability to grow food,” said Joan Nashelsky, UICHR project assistant and One Community, One Book co-organizer. “With strong local interest in sustainable agriculture, the effects of climate change on agriculture, the local food movement and the ECO Iowa City grant administered by the Iowa City Public Library and the City of Iowa City Public Works Division, the time seems right for a book with broader human rights issues close to home.”

Nashelsky coordinates the project with volunteer Pat Schnack. ECO Iowa City is a grant-funded initiative to improve environmental sustainability in Iowa City.

Kingsolver’s 12 books of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction include the novels “The Bean Trees” and “The Poisonwood Bible.” Translated into 19 languages, her work has won a devoted worldwide readership and many awards, including the National Humanities Medal.

Hopp teaches environmental studies at Emory and Henry College and conducts research in bioacoustics and the natural history of vireos, a group of small to medium-sized perching birds.

Camille Kingsolver attends Duke University, where she studies biology, anatomy and dance.

The “One Community, One Book” project will run from mid-September through mid-November. Teachers, students, librarians, book groups and others are encouraged to participate. By announcing the selection now, the project sponsors hope to allow time for groups to read the book and participate in fall community discussion forums, and for teachers to plan classroom discussions around the book.

In addition to UICHR, past project sponsors have included the UI International Writing Program, Prairie Lights Books, the UI Libraries, Iowa City Public Library, Coralville Public Library, North Liberty Community Library, Hancher Auditorium, Hills Bank & Trust Company, Iowa Book LLC, Iowa City Human Rights Commission, Solon Public Library, UI Charter Committee on Human Rights, UI Department of English, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, UI Department of History, UI International Programs and University Book Store. Iowa City High School and West High School have also participated.

For more information, contact UICHR at 319-335-3900 or uichr@uiowa.edu.

Survey Results for Electronic Resources Usage

The University of Iowa Libraries, in consultation with the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), implemented MINES (Measuring the Impact of Networked Electronic Services) during the summer of 2007. MINES is an online transaction-based survey designed to collect data on the purpose and frequency of use of electronic resources. The survey asks three multimple choice questions during 2-hour random intervals once a month. The third and final implementation on MINES began on  January 27, 2009 and will continue through December 1, 2009.

Highlights from the 2008 report:

  • The majority of the users are from the graduate college, and the medical and liberal arts and sciences fields.
  • The Libraries’ resources are mainly used from a non-library location on campus (36.6%), but accessing resources using the campus library (27.75%) and off campus locations (35.65%) follow closely.
  • The primary purpose of use of the University of Iowa Libraries’ resources is for personal research (36.66%) with coursework representing an important second highest category of use (31.59%).
  • The total number of respondents increased between 2007 (n=5,351) and 2008 (n=6,468).
  • Graduate/professional students comprised over 40% of the Libraries’ electronic networked resources uses in 2007 (n=2,176, 40.7%) and 2008 (n=2,726, 42.2%).

Maps Department Asbestos Abatement

After prepping the Maps area last week, the actual abatement efforts began earlier today. Despite best intentions (and methods) a citrus-like smell can be detected in some areas of the building. We expect abatement to continue for much of this week.

If the smell causes a problem for you, please consider using one of the other libraries on campus:

  1. Lichtenberger Engineering Library is directly across the street in the Seamans Center for Engineering.
  2. Pomerantz Business Library located in the Pappajohn Business Building has seating on two levels.
  3. Biological Sciences Library on Iowa Avenue provides quiet corners for individual studying.
  4. Hardin Library for the Health Sciences located on the health sciences campus offers a 24-hour study room.

Map Collection Project Update

University Facilities staff are preparing the Map Collection for asbestos abatement, which should begin next Tuesday.

While the abatement project is underway, Map Collection’s entrance will be in the short hallway, to the east of the copy machines on third floor.

The Map Collection and staff are still available to people needing to use the resources. For more information, please contact the Map Collection (lib-maps@uiowa.edu).

When the World Spoke Arabic Film Series – May 20

Join us for the final evening in the six-part series When the World Spoke Arabic: The Golden Age of Arab Civilization.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 7PM, ICPL, Meeting Rm. A

“From Arabic to Latin: The Assimilation of Arab Knowledge” (26 min.)
As dissension mounted between the rival Arab dynasties in Baghdad, Cordoba and Cairo, Christendom rallied to oppose the Muslims in Spain and Jerusalem. This program plots out the decline of the Empire of the Caliphate and the acquisition of Arab knowledge by Europeans starved for Islam’s intellectual riches.

“Forgetting the Arabs: Europe on the Cusp of the Renaissance” (27 min.)
Why was Islamic philosophy, once the epitome of Arab learning, eventually rejected by Muslims? And why, after assimilating it, did Europeans distance themselves from its formulators? This program seeks to understand the religious climate of the late Middle Ages, in which universities and madrassas became centers of power and models for evolving sociopolitical systems.

The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City Public Library, UI Middle East and Muslim World Studies Program, African Studies Program, and Medieval Studies Program are sponsors of this film series.

All films will be introduced by Edward Miner, International Studies Bibliographer, University of Iowa Libraries, with discussion to follow. This film series will be shown in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name in the north foyer of the University of Iowa Main Library. For more information, contact Edward Miner at (319)335-5883 or edward-miner@uiowa.edu.

When the World Spoke Arabic Film Series – May 6

Join us for the fifth evening of the six-part series When the World Spoke Arabic: The Golden Age of Arab Civilization.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 7PM, ICPL, Meeting Rm. A

“The Thousand and One Nights: A Historical Perspective” (27 min.)
Encompassing fairy tales, romances, legends, fables, parables, and anecdotes, The Thousand and One Nights is a composite of popular oral stories that developed over several centuries, mainly during the Empire of the Caliphate. This program scrutinizes the wonderfully audacious tale of Scheherazade and what it tells the attentive reader about the dreams of Arab men and women during the empire’s golden age.

“Ulema and Philosophers: Faith vs. Reason in Islamic Arabia” (26 min.)
By replacing paganism with monotheism and tribal life with empire-building, the Arabs of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties effected a complete paradigm shift in their worldview. This program studies the codification of Islamic law and assimilation of non-Arab texts—and the ensuing competition between the ulema, or doctors of the law, and the philosophers, who saw reason as an equal to divine enlightenment.

The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City Public Library, UI Middle East and Muslim World Studies Program, African Studies Program, and Medieval Studies Program are sponsors of this film series.

All films will be introduced by Edward Miner, International Studies Bibliographer, University of Iowa Libraries, with discussion to follow. This film series will be shown in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name in the north foyer of the University of Iowa Main Library. For more information, contact Edward Miner at (319)335-5883 or edward-miner@uiowa.edu.

When the World Spoke Arabic Film Series – Apr 22

Join us for the fourth evening in a six-part series of When the World Spoke Arabic: The Golden Age of Arab Civilization.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 7PM, ICPL, Meeting Rm. A

“The Secrets of the Human Body: Islam’s Contributions to Medicine” (27 min.)
This program investigates the practice of medicine during the Abbasid Caliphate, offering profiles of Jurjis ibn Jibrail, personal doctor to Caliph al-Mansur; Yuhanna ibn Masawayh, head of Caliph al-Ma’amun’s House of Wisdom; Rhazes, whose Kitab al-hawi outlines an exemplary clinical approach; Avicenna, universally known for his Canon of Medicine; and Abul Qasim al-Zahrawi, the father of modern surgery.

“Everything under the Sun: Astronomy, Mathematics, and Islam” (26 min.)
Picking up mathematics and astronomy from where the ancient Greeks had left off, Arab scholars paved the way for the Copernican revolution and the rebirth of science in Europe. This program reveals the Empire of the Caliphate’s role in developing the Indo-Arabic decimal system, algebra, and algorithms and in refining the science of optics and the Ptolemaic model of the solar system.

The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City Public Library, UI Middle East and Muslim World Studies Program, African Studies Program, and Medieval Studies Program are sponsors of this film series.

All films will be introduced by Edward Miner, International Studies Bibliographer, University of Iowa Libraries, with discussion to follow. This film series will be shown in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name in the north foyer of the University of Iowa Main Library. For more information, contact Edward Miner at (319)335-5883 or edward-miner@uiowa.edu.