Latest Headlines
0

30th Anniversary Benefit Auction: Shanna Leino

Shanna LeinoAbout the Tools:

While working on books, I found myself needing simple but special tools to carry out the work on leather, wood, and bone. That set me on the road to making folders, awls, punches, and hooks. It is satisfying to me to see others making skillful use of the tools I have made.

Tool making itself satisfies a need I have to keep my hands moving. I like the focus it provides.

Make beautiful work with good tools!

Hand-Built Tools by Shanna Leino
- Leather tool roll
- 2 leather polka dot paper weights
- Elk bone awl –for blind tooling leather
- Double ended steel awl – for marking, scribing, hole punching
- Elk bone folder – for general folding and burnishing
- Old stock Japanese snips – etched and dipped by Shanna
- Fine elk bone folder – for tighter, delicate work
- Steel micro-chisel – for punching and chiseling wood, board, and paper
- Elk bone and steel pin awl – for piercing paper
- Kelm stainless steel folder – for heavy duty scoring

Steel Tools: The steel tools are made from high carbon steel and have been heat treated for strength and durability. The steel tools are patterned by hammer blows or embellished with hand-cut steel stamps.

Carved Elk Bone Tools: The shape, size, and feel of the bone tools are in part determined by the bone it comes from. Each is unique. All of the folders I make are from elk bone, an exceptionally dense, white bone that carves wonderfully and polishes well. I receive clean, whole leg bones (an otherwise unused by-product of hunting) and spend a lot of time working it to shape with a band saw, sander and numerous hand tools. The shaped bone is then ornamented with hand carving, either a pattern made up with lines and dots, or carved flower. Hand sanding and buffing polish and complete the tools.

Estimated Value: $425

Shanna Leino

About the Artist:

Shanna grew up in Harrisville, New Hampshire. She returned after completing her BFA at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and spending a number of invaluable years of learning with the good book people in Iowa City, Iowa.

She continues to travel in search of conferences, seminars, and teaching opportunities to continue/enrich her own learning.

To bid on any of the bindings, please email us at lib-prescons@uiowa.edu. Bids will be accepted until the end of the silent auction, 7 pm CST on Thursday November 13th.

0

30th Anniversary Benefit Auction: Penny McKean

Penny McKean

About the Binding:

I approached the binding of this catalog of William Anthony’s work with great respect and admiration for William Anthony. It was an honor to study with Bill, not only because he was an excellent bookbinder and craftsman. He was generous and kind, warm and funny, a gentleman of the old school. I wanted to create a binding that reflected something of Bill’s character and Bill’s interests. I felt the binding should be understated and thoughtful, and it should have a masculine quality. For me, a visible sewing can be beautiful as well as suggesting strength. I chose muted tones of browns, greens, and rusts. I added some small in-laid squares and “dots” of leather for contrast and visual interest. The in-lays are just a small gesture, one that I hope Bill would have enjoyed, since he taught me how to do it.

This binding is an exposed spine binding. It employs a packed sewing over double raised flax cords, with the endbands sewn along with the sections. The text was sewn through a leather-lined concertina and then rounded and backed. Endbands and sewing cords lace through the boards and remain visible on the spine. The boards are covered with a medium brown vegetable-dyed goatskin. Contrasting the brown leather on the boards, black leather inlays with rust-colored “dots,” or circles, punctuate the entry of the sewing cords into the boards.

Estimated Value: $1200

Penny McKean

About the Artist:

Penny McKean has an MA in Design and an MFA in Design from the University of Iowa. She began binding books in 1985 at the Mills College Book Arts Program and was a student of William Anthony’s at the University of Iowa Conservation Lab from 1986 until his death in 1989. She has studied with David Brock, Louise Geneste, Don Glaister, Monique Lallier, Tini Muira and Pamela Spitzmueller. In 1992, Penny began working as an independent binder at her studio in Iowa City, Blackbird Bindery. From 2005 to 2012 she taught bookbinding classes at the UI Center for the Book. Her bookbinding interests include book conservation, fine binding, and fine editions. She continues to live and work in Iowa City.

To bid on any of the bindings, please email us at lib-prescons@uiowa.edu. Bids will be accepted until the end of the silent auction, 7 pm CST on Thursday November 13th.

0

Benefit Auction and Plainly Spoken Reception at University of Iowa Library

Binding by Mark Esser

Binding by Mark Esser

Two events will mark the closing of the UI Libraries Conservation Lab’s 30th anniversary celebration: a reception for the Midwest Guild of Bookworkers Exhibit Plainly Spoken, and an auction of fine bindings, to benefit the William Anthony Conservation Fund. The festivities will take place in Special Collections, 3rd floor of the Main Library, on November 13th from 6-8pm.

• The exhibit, Plainly Spoken, features 17 fine bindings from Guild members who were inspired by Julia Miller’s Publication, Books Will Speak Plain. The exhibit runs from August 14-November 30 in Special Collections.

• The Auction will feature fine bindings from “alumni” and friends of the Conservation Lab, including Mark Esser, Pamela Spitzmueller, Gary Frost, Penny McKean, Anna Embree, Julie Leonard, Emily Martin, William Minter, Lawrence Yerkes, Bill Voss, Caitlin Moore, and handmade tools from Shanna Leino. In the coming days we will be posting biographies and images from all the auction participants — stay tuned!

Proceeds from the auction will benefit the William Anthony Conservation Fund, which supports ongoing conservation activities and special projects. More details are available at http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/preservation/30years/.

0

Books of the 21st Century

Monday, October 27, 2014
Submitted by Gary Frost

The making of printed books has continued quietly across each turn of each century since the fifteenth …except for one. With the turn of the twenty-first century a sudden displacement has taken place. Thereafter books need not be something somewhere; books could be effervescent appearing and disappearing, on a screen display. The text is scrolled over the screen displacing text paging. Another way of considering this sudden bibliographical significance is that prior to the twenty-first century almost all books were not produced digitally and following the turn of the century almost all books were.

Read the rest of this entry »

0

Library Science

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Submitted by Gary Frost

Philology Book CoverFeral Seminar, 2014
Resilience of Book Transmission

Please join us for open forums,
Thursdays, 2:00—3:30, Fall Semester
Room 2058, Main Library

We have recently added an important reference for our wide study of resilience of book transmission. This is philology[1] and the legacy of comparative study of texts. We can extend this reference to include currently studied “comparative textual media”[2] as we expand philology to include screen and audio transmissions of texts. Our philology frame can also be extended if we add library science to engage books or bibliographic units and their arrangements into libraries. We could call the extension “philology of comparative libraries” and such projections could be extended to include audio and screen media.

Read the rest of this entry »

0

Cognitive Factors

Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Submitted by Gary Frost

Reading SignFeral Seminar, 2014
Resilience of Book Transmission

Please join us for open forums,
Thursdays, 2:00—3:30, Fall Semester
Room 2058, Main Library

As we arrive at the cognitive sciences we find a pivot in our studies of resilience in book transmission. This is a pivot from givens to potentials as we consider our bionic constraints and embodied cognitions and consider their amazing adaptabilities for uses such as book writing and reading.

Read the rest of this entry »

0

Don’t Be the Bunny

Friday, September 26, 2014
Submitted by Gary Frost

bunny3

Feral Seminar, 2014
Resilience of Book Transmission

Please join us for open forums,
Thursdays, 2:00—3:30, Fall Semester
Room 2058, Main Library

We have a favorite dictum as we study and manipulate the experience of media. This is “don’t be the bunny” or otherwise fall victim to contending polarities. Such binary decoys provoke inconclusive debate and displace us from study of the wide territory exactly between simple contrasts.

Read the rest of this entry »

0

Imposition and Format for Book Description

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Submitted by Gary Frost

Imposition diagram

There can be confusion regarding description of paper books; the given book needs description of how it was made as well as how it appears now, and either perspective can unfairly dominate. Makers best describe their own work, but, perhaps, they will not or cannot. Papermakers, printers and bookbinders also prefer their own exclusive explanations. Bibliographers and book conservators can bring the description up to date, but some estimation will be needed for missing information.

Read the rest of this entry »

0

Preservation & Conservation Welcomes New Hires

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Beth Stone and Justin Baumgarten in front of Keith/Albee scrapbooksThe UI Libraries Preservation & Conservation department would like to welcome two new(ish) staff members, Justin Baumgartner and Elizabeth Stone. They join us as members of the Keith/Albee project team. They will be working together, along with other UI Libraries staff, to stabilize and digitize the Keith/Albee collection. Both Justin and Elizabeth are University of Iowa graduates who are no strangers to employment at the UI Libraries.

Elizabeth Stone started on July 21, 2014 as the Keith/Albee Project Conservator. She is a recent graduate of the University of Iowa Center for the Book where she studied bookbinding, letterpress printing, and book history. As a student, she worked in Preservation & Conservation salvaging flood-damaged items from the National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library and the African American Museum of Iowa.

Justin Baumgartner started on July 22, 2014 as the Keith/Albee Digital Project Librarian. He is a recent graduate of the University of Iowa School of Library & Information Science. As a student, he worked in the UI Libraries Special Collections & University Archives and interned for the Digital History Project at the Iowa City Public Library.

The duo will shepherd 125-150 oversize scrapbooks through conservation and digitization workflows during the next three years. Visit the growing digital collection at digital.lib.uiowa.edu/keithalbee .

The Keith/Albee project is a three-year project to stabilize, digitize, and provide online access to the Keith/Albee collection which documents the activity of a prominent vaudeville theater company through more than 40 years of business. The records chronicle the expansion of the Keith/Albee circuit, changes in its leadership, and the eventual decline of vaudeville.ka_blog_q1bBlog

The Keith/Albee Project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor.

0

New Housing Option for Conservation

Thursday, September 11, 2014
Submitted by Bill Voss

Goblet in phase boxWith the recent acquisition of a riveter and a board creaser, the Conservation Lab has a new housing option – phase boxes constructed from sturdy 40 point featuring fore edge closures made of nylon string and riveted vinyl washers. Stronger than a regular 20 point four flap enclosure, and quicker to make than a full clamshell box, these phase boxes can also be modified with Volara foam padding or Ethafoam wells to accommodate objects of various shapes and sizes.Series of plates in phase box
Cross in phase boxCompleted phase box