Getting Published in Open Access Sciences Journals | Panel Discussion @IMU | Tues. Oct. 10, 2-3pm

Open access journals remove the price and permission barriers that limit the reach of scholarship. Join a panel of editors, authors, and librarians for a conversation on getting published in top open access journals. The discussion will feature editors from PLOS ONE and BioMed Central journals, as well as authors and librarians who have worked extensively with open access.

Learn about identifying key open journals in your field, developing manuscripts, the submission process, and getting your article processing charges paid. Experts will discuss the benefits and challenges of working with open access journals.

Tuesday, October 10 at 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Iowa Memorial Union (IMU), Illinois Room
125 North Madison Street, Iowa City, Iowa

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Attend this discussion if you are a graduate student, post doctoral scholar, faculty member, or researcher.

THE PANEL
Leonardo Marchini, Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry and Open Access Fund recipient

Daniel Diekema, Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases and open access proponent

Hans-Joachim Lehmler, Professor, Occupational and Environmental Health and current PLOS ONE editorial board member

Carmelita Pickett, Associate University Librarian for Collections & Scholarly Communications, University of Iowa Libraries

Mahrya Carncross, Scholarly Communications Librarian for University of Iowa Libraries, will moderate the panel.

Register online.

Need to publish? Learn how to identify and evaluate open access journals & identify predatory publishers | Workshop Thurs. April 13 @Hardin Library

You need to publish your research, but there seem to be many choices.  We can help you find the right fit.

Janna Lawrence, Deputy Director Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

This workshop will provide information about open access publishing, detail the reasons for the open access publishing movement, and describe key elements of predatory publishers.

A process often used by UI Librarians to critically evaluate the quality of open access journals will be shared to allow participants to improve their skills/efficiency with appraisal. Information about open access mandates will be included, as well as an overview of how the UI Libraries Open Access Fund works.

Thursday, April 13
11am-12pm
Hardin Library, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.  Directions to Hardin Library.

No time for the workshop?  Contact your subject specialist for individual instruction.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

Open Access Week | Guest Post |On Generous Scholarship

By Willow Fuchs

During the month of Open Access week (October 19-25) we will be highlighting a number of guest posts from University of Iowa Faculty and Staff who have personal experience making their work Open Access.  We appreciate their contributions.

The third guest post is by Meenakshi Gigi Durham, distinguished scholar, teacher, and writer whose durhamwork centers on media and the politics of the body. Her research emphasizes issues of gender, sexuality, race, youth cultures, and sexual violence.  She holds a joint appointment in the Department of Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies.

See her Iowa Research Online deposited publications here.

On generous scholarship

A vital aspect of doing academic work is disseminating the knowledge we create so as to maximize its potential to have positive effects on the world. That’s why I’m a fan of institutional repositories. The impetus in the United States today seems to be to corporatize and commoditize education, somehow turning it into a for-profit enterprise instead of a public good. Institutional repositories are a great way to challenge and resist that impulse, returning us to the recognition that research is a crucial element of a collective vision of social progress.

I lived for years in a resource-poor country, and I know that even in the wealthier nations, there are many institutions and scholars who don’t have access to the treasure trove of databases we are privileged to use every day via the wonderful library system at the University of Iowa. But scholarship can’t happen without access to up-to-date knowledge; as scholars, we build on the work that advances our fields. It’s always been inspiring to me that some of the world’s greatest ideas and inventions have been catalyzed by an encounter with some prior work: Galileo read Copernicus and came up with his theory of heliocentrism; Srinivasa Ramanujam read G.S. Carr and made groundbreaking contributions to number theory; Toni Morrison read Virginia Woolf and went on to write Nobel Prize-winning novels. Connecting with the thoughts and ideas and perspectives of others inspires and informs us. We need to make sure the next great scholar can read everything he or she wants to. Part of our work is facilitating the discoveries of the future. That takes generosity and a social conscience —that’s the spirit behind teaching, just as it is behind scholarship.

So whenever I can, I contribute my writings to Iowa Research Online. I offer my work humbly, as part of a community of thinkers whose aims are to change the world for the better. It’s truly gratifying that my IRO papers have been downloaded far more often than they have from commercial journal websites or databases. I hope they are contributing to the way others are thinking about the issues I study: gender, sexuality, and the media. I hope they are sparking new ways to think about these issues, and I hope those ideas will translate into the real goals of my own work, which include social justice, gender equity, and an end to sexual violence.

Open Access is the way that new knowledge is made easier | Faculty guest post

By Willow Fuchs

During the month of Open Access Week (October 19-25) we will be highlighting a number of guest posts from University of Iowa Faculty and Staff who have personal experience making their work Open Access.  We appreciate their contributions.

Professor Williams
Professor Williams

The first guest post is by Associate Professor, Rachel Marie-Crane Williams, Ph.D. University of Iowa,  Departmental Executive Officer of the Department of Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies, Faculty member of the School of Art and Art History/Media, Social Practice, and Design.

Open Access is the way that new knowledge is made…easier

October 19-25 is International Open Access Week all across the world. As a scholar I have directly benefited from participating in the Iowa Research Online open access platform. One of my articles has been downloaded over 12,000 times. The ripple effects of this can be seen easily on Google Scholar. That particular article is cited numerous times by other people who are pursuing similar questions in countries like Albania and Spain. If not for open access and my participation in the Iowa Research Online program I doubt those scholars would have found my work.

As a public servant at a public university I feel that an open access system for all of the scholarship that we produce is important. Print journals are expensive to produce, subscriptions are costly for individuals and libraries, and people without access to the journal can’t use the information. Ultimately as researchers we want to engage in conversations with other people about our work and trends or ideas in our field. My own research often appeals to people who are not directly connected with a university. It gives me great pleasure to know that they can still find and read my scholarship even if they can’t afford a subscription to a journal, they live in a place where the journal is not available, or they are not aware of what journals to consult in order to find information about a particular topic.

We are always standing on the shoulders of giants. Climbing up to those places in order to survey the world stretched out before us should be easy, free, and independent of our connections in academia. It is important to find what came before us with regard to a history of ideas. I wrote my dissertation at a time when printed journals were still the way that scholarship was disseminated. Google was still five years away from launching Google Scholar. As a doctoral student I traveled to university libraries all over the country to browse stacks, read journals, and find information. It was a slow, expensive, and arduous process. Now, I can simply use the internet to find information from the comfort of my own couch. With open access I can still read that information even if my university does not subscribe to the journal or I don’t have funding to purchase the articles. Having easy and free access to the ideas of others can spark our creativity, help us formulate new ideas and approaches, keep us from being redundant, and make collaboration easier, thus creating new knowledge.

Open access also levels the playing field. As an educator I care deeply about equality. Students from schools with small budgets or in developing countries can access the work of others without barriers As a teacher, it broadens the possibilities of ideas and research that I can share with students. Nothing is more frustrating than finding an abstract that seems relevant to your lecture only to discover you can’t access it without paying for it. This has real relevance for my colleagues in medicine where people’s lives might depend on access to the latest research about procedures or pharmaceuticals.

If we are committed to making new knowledge and advancing the act of discovery we must all commit ourselves to open access and to the possibilities it offers to everyone who has the technological ability to surf the web.

Open Access: Policies, Publishers, and Predators

 

 

 

 

Open Access to scientific literature is one of the most hotly debated topics in scholarly publishing. This workshop will provide an overview of what scientists need to know when making their research open access. We will cover the basics of what we mean by open access, how open access relates to the NIH Public Access policy, open access journals in the biomedical sciences, predatory publishing scams, and best practices for evaluating your open access options.

 

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

 

Our next session is:

 

Monday, May 5, 2-3 pm

 

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons

 

Register here.

Open Access: Policies, Publishers, and Predators

Open Access to scientific literature is one of the most hotly debated topics in scholarly publishing. This workshop will provide an overview of what scientists need to know when making their research open access. We will cover the basics of what we mean by open access, how open access relates to the NIH Public Access policy, open access journals in the biomedical sciences, predatory publishing scams, and best practices for evaluating your open access options.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, March 31, 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons

Register here.

Image via openscience.com

Questions? Contact us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.