Comparison of Citation Management Software: Free Open Workshop

Learn about the basic features of common citation management tools and discover which one is most appropriate for your needs. Class will include brief demonstrations of 4 tools: RefWorks, EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero. The focus of the class is to compare and contrast these products, as well as provide resources for assisting with decision making in choosing a suitable tool. Advice on getting started with using a citation manager will be offered. This workshop is hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, July 28, 1-2 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register or contact us to learn more at (319) 335-9151 or by emailing lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image via georgetown.edu]

 

Scopus & Web of Science: Learn HOW with Hardin Open Workshops

Scopus is a multidisciplinary database with substantial international coverage which allows you to track an article’s cited and citing references. All citations in EMBASE are also in Scopus. Web of Science is a citation database which covers over 10,000 journals and specializes in citation tracking. Come to this free, hands-on session and learn to search Scopus systematic reviews, find articles citing your work in Web of Science, and use the Journal Citation Index to measure scholarly impact. 

Our next session is:

Thursday, July 10, 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons Classroom

Register here. Questions? Contact us by calling (319) 335-9151 or email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image credit: Wikimedia Commons]

Searching for Genetic Info, PubMed’s Gene Sensor, NCBI and More: Learn HOW with Hardin Open Workshops

Overwhelmed by the number of databases that the National Center for Biotechnology Information has to offer on nucleotide sequences, genes and proteins? Wondering which database you should always start with? Would you like to learn how to set up an NCBI account to link articles in PubMed to records in other databases? Do you know about PubMed’s Gene Sensor? Are you familiar with the concept of linear navigation? Learn all of these tips and more in this session that is designed for anyone who needs to search the NCBI databases for genetic information. This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Friday, July 18, 1-2 pm

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, EAST Information Commons Classroom

Register here or contact us by calling 335-9151 or emailing lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

 

[Image via astrobio.net]

Get Free Help Using EndNote to Manage Citations

EndNote is a reference management tool that allows you to easily gather, organize, and insert your references in the style of your choice. This free, hands-on session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format citations.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, July 8, 11 am-12 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register here. For more information, contact our librarians at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.

Too busy for class? See our EndNote tutorials here.

 

[Image via library.nmmu.ac.za]

Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room, July 2014: Nathaniel Highmore

Nathaniel Highmore (1613-1685)

Corporis Humani Disquisitio Anatomica

The Hague: Ex oficina Samuelis Brown, 1651.

[Image via Fisher Library Digital Collections, University of Toronto].

Nathaniel Highmore of Dorset, England was a British surgeon known for his 1651 treatise on anatomy, the first of its kind to give an accurate account of the circulatory system. Highmore studied at Oxford beginning in 1631, after which he practiced at Sherborne in Dorset. Corporis, the best-known of his several works, is divided into three sections corresponding to the abdomen, thorax, and head. Although the plates, drawn in the style of Vesalius, echo those of an earlier period, Highmore was responsible for a number of important advances. The most noteworthy of these are his descriptions of the sinus maxillaris (the largest nasal cavity, then known as the antrum of Highmore) and the mediastinum testes (the septum dividing the scrotum, or Highmore’s body).

To learn more about medical history, visit the John Martin Rare Book Room website.

Get to know Curator Donna Hirst at Iowa Now.

 

How to Determine Your Scholarly Impact: Learn HOW

Hardin Open Workshops is offering a hands-on class to teach participants how to use tools such as Ulrich’s, Journal Citation Reports, Web of Science, and Scopus to determine the impact that journals, articles, and authors have had on a particular field. Topics such as impact factors, Eigenfactors, and H-indices will also be discussed. HOW workshops are hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, July 1, 10:30-11:30 am

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register here. For more information, contact our library staff at (319) 335-9151 or by email at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image via delcon.gov.in]

 

Collect and Format Bibliographic Citations with our free EndNote Workshop

EndNote is a reference management tool that allows you to easily gather, organize, and insert your references in the style of your choice. This free, hands-on session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format citations.

Our next session is:

Friday, June 20, 1-2 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register here. For more information, contact our librarians at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.

Pressed for time? See our EndNote tutorials here.

 

[Image via library.nmmu.ac.za]

Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room, May 2014: Jean Étienne Dominique Esquirol

Jean Étienne Dominique Esquirol (1772-1840)

Des maladies mentales considérées sous les rapports médical, hygiénique et médicolégal. 2 vols. Brussels : J.B. Tircher, 1838.

An inmate of Bethlem Hospital in 1814, who has been identified as William Norris, from Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol's Des maladies mentales. Brussels: Libraire médicale et scientifique de JB Tircher, 1838 [Institute of Psychiatry Historical Collection h/Esq]

Esquirol’s drawing of an inmate of Bethlem Hospital.

As Pinel’s most outstanding pupil, Esquirol so closely followed his teacher’s works that the contributions of the two men are sometimes confused. Like Pinel, Esquirol did not attempt to analyze mental illness from a philosophical standpoint, but sought to classify and describe the various kinds of insanity he encountered in his practice.

Esquirol coined the term monomania, a concept which anticipated the modern view of schizophrenia, and he was the first to distinguish hallucination from illusion.

While at Sâlpetrière, where he succeeded Pinel as chief physician, Esquirol introduced formal instruction in psychiatry and gained support for Pinel’s humanitarian reform movements by lecturing throughout Europe. Des maladies mentales, the work for which he is best known, served as a basic text in psychiatry for over fifty years.

To learn more, visit http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/rbr/

Text via Donna Hirst, Curator of Rare Books for the John Martin Rare Book Room at Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

Image via kingscollections.org