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Corridor Collaboration: Preserving Cedar Rapids’ History

Flood1-1The flood of 2008 threatened to destroy many of Cedar Rapids’ treasured artifacts. Since then, the University of Iowa Libraries’ Conservation Lab treated over 7,500 items, 100 boxes of manuscripts, and 11,000 single sheets affected by the disaster.

On April 23 the UI Alumni Association will co-host a Lifelong Learning event at the National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library to celebrate the near-completion of the UI Libraries’ restoration efforts.

Find out how the UI Libraries partnered with National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library and the African American Museum of Iowa to rescue the city’s valuable relics. Panelists will display and discuss the restored items while detailing how these organizations united to preserve these pieces of Cedar Rapids history.

Panelists:
Jeff Kueter – President and CEO, UIAA (moderator)
Dave Muhlena – Library Director, National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library
Brianna Wright – Curator, African American Museum of Iowa
Nancy E. Kraft – Head, Preservation and Conservation, UI Libraries

WHEN: Thursday, April 23, 2015, 6:30 p.m. (reception), 7 p.m. (discussion)

WHERE: National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library, Cedar Rapids, IA

The program is FREE and open to the public. Refreshments will be served and a cash bar will be available. Register by Tuesday, April 21, at: http://www.iowalum.com/lifelonglearning/czech/

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Colleen Theisen Receives Prestigious “Mover and Shaker” Award from Library Journal

UI Main Library - Staff Photos, September 2012Colleen Theisen of the University of Iowa Libraries has been named a “Mover and Shaker” in the library industry by the Library Journal.

Theisen was recognized in the magazine’s March 15 issue for her efforts to transform libraries in the 21st century. She was selected because of her commitment to the profession and her efforts to transform how library outreach and how we learn about, and interact with, the unique primary source collections in academic libraries. Library Journal especially noted herinnovative work connecting communities on campus and online to rare books and historic documents through social media, online video, and in the classroom

Theisen currently serves as special collections outreach and instruction librarian as part of Special Collections & University Archives

LJ’s newest class of Movers & Shakers proves once again that the library arena is rich with innovation driven by mission-focus,” said Rebecca T. Miller, group editor, Library Journal and School Library Journal. “Those identified come from across the library universe and beyond, and they are each transforming how libraries connect with and enrich their communities. We congratulate them, and look forward to seeing their ongoing contributions multiply.”

Theisen is from Cedar Rapids and graduated from Regis High School before completing her BA in Art History & Archaeology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She followed her degree with a teaching certificate for secondary art education at Clarke College in Dubuque, before completing her Masters of Science in Information, specializing in archives and records management, at the University of Michigan in 2011. She has worked as outreach and instruction librarian at the University of Iowa for more than three years.

The 2015 Movers & Shakers were selected by the editors of Library Journal, the profession’s leading trade magazine. Each of the Movers & Shakers will be prominently featured in the March 15th issue of Library Journal and celebrated at a special luncheon in June during the American Library Association’s annual conference in San Francisco, CA. The print feature’s companion website is sponsored by OCLC and Boopsie, and it is available at www.libraryjournal.com/movers2015. The luncheon and awards ceremony is made possible by the support of sponsors, including Baker and Taylor, Demco, Mission Bell Media, OCLC, Plata Publishing, Rosen Publishing and Sage.

Read more about new inductees at www.libraryjournal.com/movers2015.

 

ABOUT LIBRARY JOURNAL
Founded in 1876, Library Journal is one of the oldest and most respected publications covering the library field. Over 75,000 library directors, administrators, and staff in public, academic, and special libraries read LJ. Library Journal reviews over 8000 books, audiobooks, videos, databases, and web sites annually, and provides coverage of technology, management, policy, and other professional concerns. For more information, visit www.libraryjournal.comLibrary Journal is a publication of Media Source Inc., which also owns School Library Journal, The Horn Book publications, and Junior Library Guild.

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UI Libraries Launches Explorer’s Legacy Website

van allen siteThe University of Iowa Libraries has launched an online site that presents the history of the 1958 Explorer I satellite mission and the role played by UI astrophysicist James Van Allen in its success.

The site, Explorer’s Legacy, chronicles the mission that led to the first scientific discovery of the space age when Van Allen identified the radiation belts surrounding the earth. The website also provides, for the first time, access to the complete set of data collected during the Explorer I mission. Digitized from the original reel-to-reel tapes that have been preserved by the University of Iowa Libraries, these data represent the first scientific data returned to Earth from space.

The new website embeds digitized content from the Van Allen papers within a new narrative account of the mission written exclusively for the site by Abigail Foerstner, author of James Van Allen: The First Eight Billion Miles. The presentation provides a complete overview of the development, launch, and success of the Explorer missions, and highlights the participation of the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Iowa in many subsequent space missions, including the current Van Allen probes that continue to make new discoveries within the radiation belts.

“It’s great to have the first scientific measurements ever made in space available to the public,” says Craig Kletzing, F. Wendell Miller Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. “From those first days in 1958 to today’s Van Allen Probes mission, the University of Iowa is still at it, working to solve the mysteries of space.” The data tapes from the Explorer missions were created during the satellite’s orbits around the earth. When Explorer I was launched on January 31, 1958, it began to send a signal back to earth. A series of receiving stations were positioned around the globe that would listen in as the satellite passed overhead, and a technician would activate a reel-to-reel tape machine to record the signals.

In 2009, the University of Iowa began an effort to preserve the original analogue reel-to-reel tapes that were stored in the basement of MacLean Hall on the Pentacrest. Staff from the Libraries’ Preservation Department cleaned and stabilized the tapes onsite, and then transferred them to the Main Library. The entire collection is now physically stable and in appropriate environmental conditions. “This new resource is the culmination of years of effort to preserve these historic recordings,” says Greg Prickman, Head of Special Collections. “The availability of the data tapes in a digital format provides broad access to the foundational information of the space age.”

Explorer’s Legacy is the result of inter-disciplinary collaboration between librarians, conservators, physicists, writers, and digital media specialists. In years to come, it will only be getting bigger—the reel-to-reel tapes holding the data from the next successful mission, Explorer III, have already been digitized, and are being prepared for inclusion in the site.

The site was launched with support from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust.

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SuDocs Have Moved!

FDLPThe University of Iowa Libraries is a congressionally designated depository for U.S. federal government information.  This collection of print publications (classified with the Superintendent of Documents or SuDocs scheme) was recently moved from the third floor to the northwest corner of the fifth floor in the Main Library. Not only is the space on the fifth floor more accessible to our users but this has allowed the Main Library to open up space on the third floor for our ever expanding Special Collections.

Please visit the guide to finding government information for further information about the U.S. government information resources:  http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/us.

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Learning Commons Available to Faculty for Class Presentations

Rhetoric Email ImageAre you seeking opportunities for your students to become confident, eloquent, and engaging public speakers? I’d like to invite you to use the Learning Commons for your class presentations! The Learning Commons has six reservable group areas, each equipped with state-of-the-art technology, including 80-inch monitors. Laptops, cables & slide advancers are available for check out at the nearby Library service desk. Your students can even reserve a group area or room ahead of time to practice their presentations. The Learning Commons is an active, collaborative space that will give your students real-world experience presenting in a more formal and public place. If you are interested to learn more or to reserve a space today contact me at Brittney-Thomas@uiowa.edu. I’d be more than happy to help you find the perfect space and make sure your students have everything they need to knock it out of the park!

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Main Library Faculty Study Room Now Open

A new faculty study room is now available on the third floor of the Main Library.  This quiet space is accessible only to faculty and is designed for individual reading, writing, and study.  It is open all hours that the Main Library collections are publicly open.  The room is furnished with 8 desk surfaces with power outlets, 2 lounge chairs with ottomans and laptop tables, and 2 open-shelved bookcases for temporary storage; WiFi is available.  In addition, there are 16 lockers just outside the room that are available for assignment.  Please visit the web site for more information.

Any current UI faculty member may enter the room using their IowaOne ID card.  For emeritus faculty, at this time, we regret that the system is not allowing us to automatically assign access via your IowaOne card.  However, emeritus faculty may request access by: filling out this form, visting the Administration Office, Mon-Fri, 8 AM – 5 PM, or call 335-5867. Access will be assigned to you within 1-2 business days and you will be notified by email.

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University of Iowa Libraries to host Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition in 2016

Traveling exhibit to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death

Title page of Shakespeare's first folio.

The University of Iowa Libraries has been selected as the host site for the state of Iowa for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, a national traveling exhibition of the Shakespeare First Folio, one of the world’s most treasured books.

The Folger Shakespeare Library, in partnership with Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association, is touring a First Folio of Shakespeare in 2016 to all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

“We are incredibly excited to have the opportunity to showcase one of the most important books ever printed,” says University Librarian John Culshaw. “How appropriate that the First Folio visit the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, the only UNESCO City of Literature in the United States. First Folio! will be the first travelling exhibit hosted in the UI Main Library exhibition space, which is currently undergoing renovation and slated to open later this year. As the only stop on the tour in the state of Iowa, we welcome all Iowans to visit the Libraries and experience this unique piece of history.”

Many of Shakespeare’s plays were not published during his lifetime. The First Folio is the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death. Two of Shakespeare’s fellow actors compiled 36 of his plays, hoping to preserve them for future generations. Without it, we would not have 18 of Shakespeare’s plays, including Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, and As You Like It. All 18 appear for the first time in print in the First Folio.

“The First Folio is the book that gave us Shakespeare. Between its covers we discover his most famous characters—Hamlet, Desdemona, Cordelia, Macbeth, Romeo, Juliet, and hundreds of others—speaking words that continue to move and inspire us,” says Michael Witmore, director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. “Shakespeare tells the human story like no one else. We are delighted that we can share this precious resource with people everywhere.”

When the First Folio arrives in Iowa City, its pages will be opened to the most quoted line from Shakespeare and one of the most quoted lines in the world, “to be or not to be” from Hamlet. Accompanying the book will be a multi-panel exhibition exploring the significance of Shakespeare, then and now, with additional digital content and interactive activities.

“In addition to showcasing the First Folio, the Libraries will be highlighting other examples of English early printed materials in an expansive exhibition,” says Greg Prickman, head of Special Collections. “We are also excited to be working with many campus and community partners to host a range of programs for the public.”

Final touring dates for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will be announced in April.

The Folger Shakespeare Library holds 82 copies of the First Folio, by far the largest collection in the world and more than a third of the 233 known copies in the world today. It is believed that 750 copies were originally printed.

The Shakespeare First Folio is one of the most valuable printed books in the world; a First Folio sold for $6.2 million in 2001 at Christie’s and another one for $5.2 million in 2006 in London. It originally sold for one British pound (20 shillings)—about $200 today.

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, and by the generous support of Google.org and Vinton and Sigrid Cerf. Sponsorship opportunities of this major exhibition and the Folger’s other Wonder of Will programs commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death are available; learn more at www.folger.edu.

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About University of Iowa Libraries

The University of Iowa Libraries provides leadership in the creation, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to advance intellectual discovery and encourage lifelong learning. With print and digital collections that are richly diverse and deeply comprehensive, the Libraries also offers state-of-the-art resources that enhance teaching and learning on campus and beyond. In partnership with the teaching faculty, the Libraries offers a variety of information literacy and course-related instructional programs designed to develop these critical skills in students in all disciplines. The Libraries is the largest library system in Iowa and ranks 14th among materials expenditures among U.S. public research libraries. University Libraries is proud of its role as the foundation on which the University of Iowa’s academic and research programs rest.


About Folger Shakespeare Library
Folger Shakespeare Library is a world-renowned center for scholarship, learning, culture, and the arts. It is home to the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500-1750). The Folger is an internationally recognized research library offering advanced scholarly programs in the humanities; an innovator in the preservation of rare materials; a national leader in how Shakespeare is taught in grades K–12; and an award-winning producer of cultural and arts programs—theatre, music, poetry, exhibits, lectures and family programs. Learn more at www.folger.edu.

About Cincinnati Museum Center
Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) at Union Terminal is a nationally recognized institution and national historic landmark. Dedicated to sparking community dialogue, insight and inspiration, CMC was awarded the 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and received accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2012. CMC is one of only 16 museums in the nation with both of these honors, making it a unique asset and a vital community resource. Union Terminal has been voted the nation’s 45th most important building by the American Institute of Architects. Organizations within CMC include the Cincinnati History Museum, Duke Energy Children’s Museum, Museum of Natural History & Science, Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater and Cincinnati History Library & Archives. Recognized by Forbes Traveler Magazine as the 17th most visited museum in the country, CMC welcomes more than one million visitors annually. For more information, visit www.cincymuseum.org.

About the American Library Association
The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

ALA’s Public Programs Office provides leadership, resources, training and networking opportunities that help thousands of librarians nationwide develop and host cultural programs for adult, young adult and family audiences. The mission of the ALA Public Programs Office is to promote cultural programming as an essential part of library service in all types of libraries. Projects include book and film discussion series, literary and cultural programs featuring authors and artists, professional development opportunities and traveling exhibitions. School, public, academic and special libraries nationwide benefit from the office’s programming initiatives. Additional information can be found at www.ala.org/programming.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

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Make your own books, and eat them, too.… Edible Book Festival, April 1

Library CakeThe University of Iowa Libraries invites faculty, staff, students, and the Iowa City community to celebrate the annual International Edible Book Festival April 1 by crafting a delicious book to share and, of course, eat.

To participate, follow two simple rules: entries must be edible, and they must have something to do with books as shapes and/or content. Edible books will be displayed on April 1 in the Main Library Learning Commons, Group Study Rooms 1103 and 1105 in the South Lobby from 3:00-3:45 p.m., followed by a book tasting.

Prizes will be awarded in multiple categories including Best Book Structure, Best Literary Allusion, Judge’s Favorite, Audience Favorite, and Best Tasting. Judges will include Executive Chef of the Iowa Memorial Union Barry Greenberg, and University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections Librarian Colleen Theisen.

Photos and updates will be added to the Twitter hashtag #ediblebookiowa.

The International Edible Book Festival is an annual event held on April 1 around the world. The event unites bibliophiles, book artists, and food lovers to celebrate the ingestion of culture and its fulfilling nourishment. Participants create edible books that are exhibited, photographed, and then consumed. Information and inspiration can be found at www.Books2Eat.com.

For more information or to submit an entry, please contact Brett Cloyd via email at brett-cloyd@uiowa.edu or by telephone at (319) 335-5743, and bring your entry to Room 1103 between 2:00-2:45 p.m. on April 1.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Brett Cloyd in advance.

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Main Library Exhibition Space Renovation

The Main Library is currently in the process of renovating the first floor exhibition space. Over the next several months, the air handling, filtration, and lighting systems will be upgraded to museum environmental standards. For the first time we will be able to safely showcase our rare books, documents, photographs, artifacts and other items.  This renovation will provide a dynamic and interactive exhibition space that will provide new opportunities for the Libraries to engage with the campus and the community.

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EndNote Fully Supported by the Libraries

By pooling central and collegiate resources, and with the support of CCOM, CLAS, and ITS, the University has acquired a campus-wide license for EndNote, a popular and powerful citation management program for organizing, sharing, and formatting citations for publication. There are two versions of EndNote: EndNote Basic (web-based version, available for free to all UI students, faculty, and staff) and EndNote Desktop (client-based version, available for free to UI graduate students, faculty, and staff). The two versions work synchronously so you can access your references from any device with an Internet connection. EndNote is fully supported by the Libraries, and documentation, workshops, and individual assistance is available.