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Labor Day Weekend Hours @Hardin Library

The Hardin Library has reduced hours of the Labor Day weekend.

Saturday, August 30 CLOSED Home football game
Sunday, August 31 Open Noon-9pm
Monday, September 1 CLOSED Labor Day holiday
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Learn PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics @Hardin Library Tuesday 9/2

picture of Amy Blevins

Librarian Instructor Amy Blevins

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences.  This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session is:
September 2, 1:00-2:00pm, Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register for this or any of our workshops online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ or by calling 319-335-9151.  You may also request a personal session online.

 

pubmed graphic

 

 

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ClinicalKey now working with Internet Explorer version 11

link to clinicalkeyClinicalKey now works with v. 11 of Internet Explorer, as well as other browsers.  Last week ClinicalKey was not working with IE 11 due to a Microsoft upgrade.

If you have trouble accessing ClinicalKey, please give us a call at 319-335-9151.

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Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Services

Our interlibrary loan department delivers thousands of books and journal articles to patrons each year at no cost. Last year, our interlibrary loan staff borrowed over 6,000 items on behalf of our patrons and lent over 12,000 items from our collection to other libraries!

Services also include document delivery, we’ll locate items in our collection, such as journal articles or book chapters, and scan and deliver the content to you electronically. This is a popular service, our staff delivered over 5,000 items through document delivery last year.

To place a request or get more information, please visit our site at: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/illa/.

All interlibrary loan and document delivery services are free to our students, faculty and staff.

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Embase Now Available

Embase, an important biomedical database, is now available for all University of Iowa users. Sometimes called the “European MEDLINE,” Embase is another resource for supporting evidence-based medicine, the creation of systematic reviews, and, particularly, pharmacology-related information.

Embase can be accessed from the Health Sciences Resources page.  For assistance in searching Embase, contact your Hardin liaison.

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Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room – Jean Pecquet

picture of dissection

from JEAN PECQUET (1622-1674). Experimenta nova anatomica, quibus incognitum hactenus chyli receptaculum, & ab eo per thoracem in ramos usque subclavios vasa lactea deteguntur. Paris: Apud Sebastianum Cramoisy et Gabrielem Cramoisy, 1651.

At the beginning of the 17th century, it was widely believed that food was converted into blood as it passed through the digestive system. The blood was then carried to the liver where it was imbued with natural spirits and passed on to the heart for distribution through the body. Since only the blood vessels were known to the anatomists of that day, it was thought that chyle, the product of digestion, was transported to the liver by the venous system of the intestines.

This notion was corrected by Gaspare Aselli in 1627 when, by accident, he discovered the lacteal vessels in the mesentery of a dog. He incorrectly surmised that the lacteal vessels empty their contents into the liver. It was not until 1651 that Pecquet reported his discovery of the receptaculum chyli and thoracic duct. He accurately described the lacteal veins of Aselli and showed that they terminate in the receptaculum chyli and that the thoracic duct joins the venous systems at the junction of the jugular and subclavian veins.

Joannes van Horne made the same discovery quite independently and corroborated Pecquet’s findings. Later Pecquet’s work was confirmed and extended to cover the entire lymphatic system by Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702) and Thomas Bartholin. The copperplate engraving clearly depicts the main lymphatic system both in a separate figure and in the dissected abdomen and thorax of a dog.

 

 

 

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Comparison of Citation Management Software: Free Open Workshop

Learn about the basic features of common citation management tools and discover which one is most appropriate for your needs. Class will include brief demonstrations of 4 tools: RefWorks, EndNote, Mendeley, and Zotero. The focus of the class is to compare and contrast these products, as well as provide resources for assisting with decision making in choosing a suitable tool. Advice on getting started with using a citation manager will be offered. This workshop is hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, July 28, 1-2 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register or contact us to learn more at (319) 335-9151 or by emailing lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image via georgetown.edu]

 

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New Exhibit in the John Martin Rare Book Room

Syphilis and Paul Ehrlich:

an Historical Case Study

Treponema_pallidum

Sahachiro Hata, working in Paul Erlich’s laboratory in 1908, discovered the arsenic compound arsphenamine (later known as Salvarsan), which was the first effective treatment for syphilis. The disease, which is transmitted either sexually or congenitally, begins as a superficial affliction but can lead to serious complications including seizures, aneurysms, and deformation in its later stages.

Syphilis has haunted global history and culture for centuries. Scientists debate its arrival in the Americas, with the greatest evidence supporting the Colombian hypothesis arguing that Christopher Columbus’ crewmen brought syphilis back with them from the Americas. Several famous historical figures including Franz Schubert are thought to have contracted the disease. It has been treated in art by Albrecht Dürer and in the femme fatale (“poison woman”) literature of 19th century writers such as John Keats. It was the subject of questionable ethical practices in the Tuskegee syphilis study of 1932.

Treponema pallidum (pictured), the bacterium which causes syphilis, was not discovered until 1905. This discovery paved the way for Hata’s cure. The disease currently affects an estimated 12 million people with 90% of those cases being in the developing world. Since penicillin became widely available in the 1940s, syphilis can be treated effectively with antibiotics.

durer170px-Tertiary_syphilis_headhata

Images: treponema pallidum; Dürer’s “Syphilitic Man” (1496); bust of deformation in a patient with gummatous syphilis; Hata and Ehrlich.

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Searching Nutrition in PubMed is Difficult – Hardin Class will teach you HOW – Thursday, July 24

Nutrition is a trending subject that’s important in many areas of the health sciences. Nutrition is one of the most difficult subjects to search in PubMed, because relevant aspects of the subject are scattered among multiple  subject terms.

We’re offering a class to help you optimize your searches for nutrition, diet and food in PubMed. The class is appropriate for all health sciences specialties.  It will be taught by Janna Lawrence and Eric Rumsey, both of whom are experienced in searching nutrition and other subjects in PubMed.

Time: Thursday, July 24, 10:30-11:30 AM

Location: Hardin Library  EAST Information Commons Classroom, 2nd floor

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ 

Questions? Contact us by calling (319) 335-9151 or email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu.

As background for the class, or if you’re not able to attend, we have written several blog articles on nutrition searching in PubMed. This one will get you started, and lead to our other articles:

Searching for Food, Diet & Nutrition in PubMed

 

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Scopus & Web of Science: Learn HOW with Hardin Open Workshops

Scopus is a multidisciplinary database with substantial international coverage which allows you to track an article’s cited and citing references. All citations in EMBASE are also in Scopus. Web of Science is a citation database which covers over 10,000 journals and specializes in citation tracking. Come to this free, hands-on session and learn to search Scopus systematic reviews, find articles citing your work in Web of Science, and use the Journal Citation Index to measure scholarly impact. 

Our next session is:

Thursday, July 10, 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons Classroom

Register here. Questions? Contact us by calling (319) 335-9151 or email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image credit: Wikimedia Commons]