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Open Access and the Public Good, Sept 26 at 2pm Old Capitol Senate Chamber

Each fall the University of Iowa Libraries organizes events to spread awareness of open access and related issues regarding publishing and the free availability of information. Our first event this year is a panel discussion on the topic of “Open Access and the Public Good,” during which Professor Russell Ganim (Division of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures) will moderate a conversation between the Honorable James Leach (Law), Professor Christina Bohannan (Law), and Professor Bernd Fritzsch (Biology). Among the topics will be how research in the Humanities and Sciences is financed and conducted and who has the right to access its results. This panel discussion will occur Friday, September 26th at 2 pm in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber.

 

This event is free and open to the public, and we hope you’ll come join the conversation about open access. To learn more about open access at the University of Iowa, visit http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/openaccess/ and read the University Libraries’ Scholarly Publishing blog, Transitions.

 

And our second event is a Free Screening of THE INTERNET’S OWN BOY at FILMSCENE Saturday, September 27th, 2:30 pm, with a Q & A to follow.

 

Complementing the faculty panel discussion on open access that will occur next week, FilmScene will host a free screening of the Aaron Swartz documentary The Internet’s Own Boy on Saturday, September 27th at 2:30 pm, followed by a Q & A with University of Iowa professors Kembrew McLeod (Communications) and Stephen Voyce (English). The film “follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. . . This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.” The screening is free and open to the public.

 

POST-SCREENING Q & A WITH KEMBREW MCLEOD AND STEPHEN VOYCE

 

And stick around after the film to talk about open access, copyright, intellectual property, and other issues related to the free access of information with two local scholars in the fields of digital scholarship and internet-based creativity:

 

Kembrew McLeod is a Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa, independent documentary filmmaker, and music critic. His book Freedom of Expression®: Overzealous Copyright Bozos and Other Enemies of Creativity (2nd ed., University of Minnesota Press, 2007) received the American Libraries Association Oboler Award for Best Scholarship in the Area of Intellectual Freedom. He is also the author of Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World (NYU Press, 2014); with Peter DiCola, of Creative License: the Law and Culture of Digital Sampling (Duke University Press, 2011); and the editor, with Rudolf Kuenzli, of Cutting Across Media: Appropriation Art, Interventionist Collage, and Copyright Law (Duke University Press, 2011). Follow him on twitter: https://twitter.com/kembrew

 

Stephen Voyce is an Assistant Professor in the English department at the University of Iowa. His recent book, Poetic Community: Avant-Garde Activism and Cold War Culture (University of Toronto Press, Spring 2013), addresses several key poetic groups collaborating after World War II. He is currently working on a book project titled Open Source Culture: Literature, Appropriation, and the Public Domain, which investigates how late-twentieth-century poets, fiction writers, and artists creatively subvert intellectual property law and the regimes that enforce these policies. He is a member of the University of Iowa’s Digital Studio for Public Arts & Humanities and the director of the Fluxus Digital Archive.

 

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Nominate your favorite librarian for Benton Award

The University Libraries is seeking nominations for the Arthur Benton University Librarian’s Award for Excellence. Funded by a generous endowment, this prestigious award acknowledges a library staff member’s professional contributions in the practice of librarianship, service to the profession, scholarship, or leadership which has had a significant impact or innovation to the operations of the Libraries or the University of Iowa. The library staff member will receive $1,500 to be used for professional development activities.

Criteria for the award and the nomination form are available at:   http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/admin/bentonaward/

Nominations are due by Friday, September 26. Please forward this message to faculty and graduate assistants in your department and encourage them to submit nominations. Thank you for your assistance.

*The University Libraries includes the Main Library, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, and the Art, Sciences, Business, Engineering, and Music libraries. (Professional staff in the Law Library and other campus departmental library staff are not eligible.)

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University of Iowa Libraries names Carmelita Pickett Associate University Librarian

PICKETT-CARMELITA-34Carmelita Pickett, collection development officer at Texas A&M University Libraries, has been named associate university librarian for the University of Iowa, effective October 13.

Pickett joined the university libraries at TAMU in 2003 as an Africana studies librarian. In 2009, she became the director of collection development operations and acquisitions services, where she provides leadership to the collection management team with a budget of over $15 million. Responsible for all aspects of the libraries’ collection development strategy, she was instrumental for developing a value statement that is used as an advocacy tool when negotiating with publishers.

Her national service includes elected positions in the Association of College and Research Libraries African American Studies Librarians Section and the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services as well as her appointment to the ACRL Dr. E.J. Josey Spectrum Scholar Mentor Committee and as an ALA Spectrum Scholarship Juror.

“The University of Iowa Libraries is a great library and I’m humbled to be a part of such a dynamic group of professionals,” said Pickett. “It’s an exciting time for research libraries as we position ourselves to better understand and engage the people we serve. The focus of 21st century collections, spaces and services should be to meet the needs and wants of users rather than maintaining old systems and structures that inhibit the academic enterprise in its core mission: research, teaching, and learning.”

“Building a research library for the 21st century requires an innovative approach to building a highly relevant and useful collection that both students and scholars need,” said John Culshaw, University Librarian. “Carmelita has spearheaded projects that have balanced research demands as well as budget priorities. We are excited to have her as part of the Libraries’ senior leadership team as we move forward.”

Pickett will succeed Edward Shreeves who had served as associate university librarian for nearly 25 years until his retirement in 2012. Michael Wright has served as interim associate university librarian since Shreeves’ retirement.

As associate university librarian, Pickett will be an integral part of the Libraries’ administrative team and provide leadership to a group of subject specialist librarians who represent every discipline at the University of Iowa.

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Art Library Open

The Art Library is again open in Art Building West.

Interim hours (Aug 11-22) are 8:30a – 12:00p and 1:00p – 5:00 p M-F (closed Sat and Sun).

For more information, please check the library’s website or call (319)335-3089.

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Art Library materials usage during flood.

As a result of the closing of Art Building West (ABW), the staff of the Art Library have made arrangements to provide resources for art faculty and students.

  • Art Library books checked out by UI graduate students and faculty will be automatically renewed.
  • Materials on Reserve will be placed at Main Library Reserve.
  • Materials currently on hold at the Art Library will be at the Service Desk in the Main Library.
  • Materials may be returned to the Main Library.

 

Please use Interlibrary Loan for all needed materials (library staff will not have access to ABW).

Please contact the Art Library staff (lib-art@uiowa.edu) or Main Library Circulation staff (lib-maincirc@uiowa.edu) with any questions.

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Art Library CLOSED

With the closure of Art Building West (ABW) due to possible flooding, the Art Library will be closing at 3:00 p.m. on July 2 until further notice.

  • Materials on Reserve will be placed at Main Library Reserve.
  • Materials currently on hold at the Art Library will be at the Service Desk in the Main Library.
  • Materials may be returned to the Main Library.
  • Please use Interlibrary Loan for all needed materials (library staff will not have access to ABW).
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Finals Week in the Libraries

As you finish prepare for your exams, the Libraries have some things planned to help you stay balanced.

Study all night, Main Library will be open 24/7, May 9-16.

Pet a dog, 4-7PM, May 13 — Therapy Dogs of Johnson County will be in Main Library room 2032 for you to cuddle and relax with.

May 11-13, each night from 10PM until it runs out, there will be free coffee at Food for Thought Cafe.

Eat some free popcorn at midnight, May 12, in the Learning Commons. We will also have a Confess Your Stress photobooth confessional at that time. 

Post a secret anytime from May 9-May 20 in the Learning Commons.

Send a postcard home anytime from May 9-May 20 in the Learning Commons, Hardin, and the Business Library. Postage will be paid by the University of Iowa Alumni Association and Students Today, Alumni Tomorrow.

Finally, make a button or do some coloring from 8-10PM on May 14 at the craft table in the Learning Commons.

Over at the Sciences Library, you can also find free coffee and treats, de-stress with Legos, and challenge your study partner to a game on the Wii.

At the Business Library, you can get treats and take a few minutes to refocus your mind with some puzzles.

You can always check what is happening in Main Library by checking the calendar.

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Check out books and eat them too… Edible Books Festival, April 1

The University of Iowa Libraries invites faculty, staff, students, and the community to celebrate the annual International Edible Books Festival April 1 by crafting a delicious book to share and, of course, eat.

To participate, follow two simple rules: entries must be edible, and they must have something to do with books as shapes and/or content. Edible books will be displayed on April 1 in the Main Library Learning Commons, Group Study Rooms1103 and 1105 in the South Lobby from 3:00-4:30 p.m., followed by a book tasting.

Prizes will be awarded in multiple categories including Best Book Structure, Best Literary Allusion, Judge’s Favorite, Audience Favorite, and Best Tasting. Entries will be judged by the Iowa City Press-Citizen’s Michael Knock, University of Iowa Center for the Book’s Emily Martin, and University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections Librarian Colleen Theisen.

For more information or to submit an entry, please contact Brett Cloyd via email at brett-cloyd@uiowa.edu or by telephone at (319) 335-5743, and bring your entry to Room 1103 between 2:00-2:45 p.m. on April 1.

The International Edible Books Festival is an annual event held on April 1 around the world. The event unites bibliophiles, book artists, and food lovers to celebrate the ingestion of culture and its fulfilling nourishment. Participants create edible books that are exhibited, photographed, and then consumed. Information and inspiration can be found at www.Books2Eat.com.

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Takedown Notices from Publishers: What are your rights?

Chris Diaz, Residency Librarian, Scholarly Communications & Collections
Karen Fischer, Collections Analysis Librarian

You may have read in the Washington Post or the Chronicle of Higher Education that users of Academia.edu have had their research papers taken down from their profile pages. Elsevier, the largest publisher of journals in the Scientific, Technical, and Medical fields, has been sending takedown notices to third-party websites, like Academia.edu, hosting research articles published in their journals. As the copyright holder, Elsevier is within their rights to do this because publishing agreements often give them the exclusive right to sell and distribute the article, thus prohibiting sharing of those articles by the author or anyone else.

The University of Iowa Libraries offers a number of options to support and encourage the permissible posting of research articles online. As the author of an original research paper, you can decide how you want your findings to reach your audience. By publishing in an academic journal, you are within your rights to negotiate for terms that suit your needs. One way to do this is to attach the University of Iowa’s Author’s Addendum to your next publishing agreement. This addendum preserves your right to share your work online through a personal website or Iowa Research Online, the University’s open access archive for scholarship. Iowa Research Online is a free resource for making scholarship available online and preserved in perpetuity by the Libraries. In addition to hosting and preserving research articles, Iowa Research Online accepts conference proceedings, presentations, and multimedia to meet the diverse methods by which scholars share their work.

If you have received a takedown notice from a publisher or have any questions about copyright or publishing agreements, please contact your librarian for assistance. To learn more about the University Libraries’ publishing services, please visit our informative guides on Scholarly Publishing issues and Copyright. We look forward to helping you in your scholarly endeavors.

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Millions of Titles to Borrow

Amy Paulus, Head of Access Services

Looking for books not available or not owned by the University Libraries?  Try UBorrow! A book found in UBorrow will be delivered quickly from one of 15 research libraries (Big Ten Universities plus Center for Research Libraries, University of Chicago, Maryland, and Rutgers), arriving within one week of request.

You can use these materials for 12 weeks, a much longer loan period than a traditional interlibrary loan, without the fear of having it recalled from you. A four week renewal is also an option. If you discover materials through UBorrow that are not available, the interlibrary loan option is presented and staff will request from other libraries. To further simplify, these requests can be tracked and managed along with the rest of your interlibrary loan requests through the ILL system: https://uiowa.illiad.oclc.org/illiad/illiad.dll.  To ensure your request will be submitted automatically, you should log-in to the ILL system before performing searches in UBorrow.  For further information, instructions, tutorials, and a link to UBorrow, see the UBorrow libguide at http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/uborrow.