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University of Iowa Libraries to host Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition in 2016

Traveling exhibit to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death

Title page of Shakespeare's first folio.

The University of Iowa Libraries has been selected as the host site for the state of Iowa for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, a national traveling exhibition of the Shakespeare First Folio, one of the world’s most treasured books.

The Folger Shakespeare Library, in partnership with Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association, is touring a First Folio of Shakespeare in 2016 to all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

“We are incredibly excited to have the opportunity to showcase one of the most important books ever printed,” says University Librarian John Culshaw. “How appropriate that the First Folio visit the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, the only UNESCO City of Literature in the United States. First Folio! will be the first travelling exhibit hosted in the UI Main Library exhibition space, which is currently undergoing renovation and slated to open later this year. As the only stop on the tour in the state of Iowa, we welcome all Iowans to visit the Libraries and experience this unique piece of history.”

Many of Shakespeare’s plays were not published during his lifetime. The First Folio is the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death. Two of Shakespeare’s fellow actors compiled 36 of his plays, hoping to preserve them for future generations. Without it, we would not have 18 of Shakespeare’s plays, including Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, and As You Like It. All 18 appear for the first time in print in the First Folio.

“The First Folio is the book that gave us Shakespeare. Between its covers we discover his most famous characters—Hamlet, Desdemona, Cordelia, Macbeth, Romeo, Juliet, and hundreds of others—speaking words that continue to move and inspire us,” says Michael Witmore, director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. “Shakespeare tells the human story like no one else. We are delighted that we can share this precious resource with people everywhere.”

When the First Folio arrives in Iowa City, its pages will be opened to the most quoted line from Shakespeare and one of the most quoted lines in the world, “to be or not to be” from Hamlet. Accompanying the book will be a multi-panel exhibition exploring the significance of Shakespeare, then and now, with additional digital content and interactive activities.

“In addition to showcasing the First Folio, the Libraries will be highlighting other examples of English early printed materials in an expansive exhibition,” says Greg Prickman, head of Special Collections. “We are also excited to be working with many campus and community partners to host a range of programs for the public.”

Final touring dates for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will be announced in April.

The Folger Shakespeare Library holds 82 copies of the First Folio, by far the largest collection in the world and more than a third of the 233 known copies in the world today. It is believed that 750 copies were originally printed.

The Shakespeare First Folio is one of the most valuable printed books in the world; a First Folio sold for $6.2 million in 2001 at Christie’s and another one for $5.2 million in 2006 in London. It originally sold for one British pound (20 shillings)—about $200 today.

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, and by the generous support of Google.org and Vinton and Sigrid Cerf. Sponsorship opportunities of this major exhibition and the Folger’s other Wonder of Will programs commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death are available; learn more at www.folger.edu.

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About University of Iowa Libraries

The University of Iowa Libraries provides leadership in the creation, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to advance intellectual discovery and encourage lifelong learning. With print and digital collections that are richly diverse and deeply comprehensive, the Libraries also offers state-of-the-art resources that enhance teaching and learning on campus and beyond. In partnership with the teaching faculty, the Libraries offers a variety of information literacy and course-related instructional programs designed to develop these critical skills in students in all disciplines. The Libraries is the largest library system in Iowa and ranks 14th among materials expenditures among U.S. public research libraries. University Libraries is proud of its role as the foundation on which the University of Iowa’s academic and research programs rest.


About Folger Shakespeare Library
Folger Shakespeare Library is a world-renowned center for scholarship, learning, culture, and the arts. It is home to the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500-1750). The Folger is an internationally recognized research library offering advanced scholarly programs in the humanities; an innovator in the preservation of rare materials; a national leader in how Shakespeare is taught in grades K–12; and an award-winning producer of cultural and arts programs—theatre, music, poetry, exhibits, lectures and family programs. Learn more at www.folger.edu.

About Cincinnati Museum Center
Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) at Union Terminal is a nationally recognized institution and national historic landmark. Dedicated to sparking community dialogue, insight and inspiration, CMC was awarded the 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and received accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2012. CMC is one of only 16 museums in the nation with both of these honors, making it a unique asset and a vital community resource. Union Terminal has been voted the nation’s 45th most important building by the American Institute of Architects. Organizations within CMC include the Cincinnati History Museum, Duke Energy Children’s Museum, Museum of Natural History & Science, Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater and Cincinnati History Library & Archives. Recognized by Forbes Traveler Magazine as the 17th most visited museum in the country, CMC welcomes more than one million visitors annually. For more information, visit www.cincymuseum.org.

About the American Library Association
The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

ALA’s Public Programs Office provides leadership, resources, training and networking opportunities that help thousands of librarians nationwide develop and host cultural programs for adult, young adult and family audiences. The mission of the ALA Public Programs Office is to promote cultural programming as an essential part of library service in all types of libraries. Projects include book and film discussion series, literary and cultural programs featuring authors and artists, professional development opportunities and traveling exhibitions. School, public, academic and special libraries nationwide benefit from the office’s programming initiatives. Additional information can be found at www.ala.org/programming.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

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Make your own books, and eat them, too.… Edible Book Festival, April 1

Library CakeThe University of Iowa Libraries invites faculty, staff, students, and the Iowa City community to celebrate the annual International Edible Book Festival April 1 by crafting a delicious book to share and, of course, eat.

To participate, follow two simple rules: entries must be edible, and they must have something to do with books as shapes and/or content. Edible books will be displayed on April 1 in the Main Library Learning Commons, Group Study Rooms 1103 and 1105 in the South Lobby from 3:00-3:45 p.m., followed by a book tasting.

Prizes will be awarded in multiple categories including Best Book Structure, Best Literary Allusion, Judge’s Favorite, Audience Favorite, and Best Tasting. Judges will include Executive Chef of the Iowa Memorial Union Barry Greenberg, and University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections Librarian Colleen Theisen.

Photos and updates will be added to the Twitter hashtag #ediblebookiowa.

The International Edible Book Festival is an annual event held on April 1 around the world. The event unites bibliophiles, book artists, and food lovers to celebrate the ingestion of culture and its fulfilling nourishment. Participants create edible books that are exhibited, photographed, and then consumed. Information and inspiration can be found at www.Books2Eat.com.

For more information or to submit an entry, please contact Brett Cloyd via email at brett-cloyd@uiowa.edu or by telephone at (319) 335-5743, and bring your entry to Room 1103 between 2:00-2:45 p.m. on April 1.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Brett Cloyd in advance.

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Main Library Exhibition Space Renovation

The Main Library is currently in the process of renovating the first floor exhibition space. Over the next several months, the air handling, filtration, and lighting systems will be upgraded to museum environmental standards. For the first time we will be able to safely showcase our rare books, documents, photographs, artifacts and other items.  This renovation will provide a dynamic and interactive exhibition space that will provide new opportunities for the Libraries to engage with the campus and the community.

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EndNote Fully Supported by the Libraries

By pooling central and collegiate resources, and with the support of CCOM, CLAS, and ITS, the University has acquired a campus-wide license for EndNote, a popular and powerful citation management program for organizing, sharing, and formatting citations for publication. There are two versions of EndNote: EndNote Basic (web-based version, available for free to all UI students, faculty, and staff) and EndNote Desktop (client-based version, available for free to UI graduate students, faculty, and staff). The two versions work synchronously so you can access your references from any device with an Internet connection. EndNote is fully supported by the Libraries, and documentation, workshops, and individual assistance is available.

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Student Work in the Public Sphere: A Learning Commons Workshop

studentworkinthepublicsphere
Time: Friday, February 20th from 1:30-4:30pm

Location: Main Library Learning Commons

Students look at and treat assignments differently when those assignments culminate in the dynamic presentation of their work in a public space. Faculty can use assignments and projects to encourage students to engage with the spaces and people around them

This workshop hosted by the Main Library Learning Commons will provide instructors the opportunity to reimagine how their classes can perform or display student works in the Learning Commons space. Participants will

  • tour the Learning Commons facilities.
  • learn how faculty and campus partners have used the Learning Commons
  • have time to rework a current or previous assignment into something that can be displayed or performed in the Learning Commons.

Guest instructors will share their insights and experiences in using the Learning Commons to promote their student’s work. Participants will leave with a variety of project ideas for classroom use and will be well on their way towards reimagining a current or old assignment to be hosted in the Learning Commons. The institute is open to all faculty and instructors. There is no cost to attend, although pre-registration to the institute is required. Please register here.

 

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Celebrate Valentine’s Day at the University of Iowa Main Library

Have you been searching for a good book to spend Valentine’s Day with? Want to use your card game skills to attract a mate? Looking for a rare book to discuss over dinner with that special someone? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you should stop by the UI Main Library this week to check out some of our Valentine’s Day events!

Play with Hearts
Tuesday, February 10th
12:00pm-2:00pm

Come to Group Area D (across from Food for Thought Café) to learn how to play the game, Hearts. You can also enjoy some vintage baked goods made from recipes from special collections’ historic recipe collection. There will even be recipes available for you to plan your own Valentine’s meal!

Blind Date with a Book
Wednesday, February 11th
12:00pm-2:00pm

Stop by Group Area D to check out a book. But this time, there will be no judging by the cover.
We’ll set you up with a blind date that you get to take home with you for some Valentine’s reading. A Spinster’s Tale or Love in the Time of Cholera: Which one will you take home tonight?

Love in the Stacks
Thursday, February 12th
12:00pm-4:00pm

Drop into Group Area D and we’ll help you out with some Valentine’s gifts! View items from the University of Iowa Special Collections and University Archives while you make buttons from prints of our more romantic books, or send an e-card to your loved ones.

You never know where love will find you, but you do know where to find us. We’ll see you in Group Area D!

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Main Library North Entrance Without ADA Access through September 2015

ADA access via the North entrance of the Main Library will not be available during construction of the new Main Library Exhibit Space next to Shambaugh Auditorium. Regular access will be available through one of the North entrance doors. Patrons needing ADA access are directed to use the East and South doors. This restriction will remain in place throughout construction, projected to be completed by August/September, 2015.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

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Library Exhibit Space Renovation to Begin Monday, December 22

Construction on the Main Library Exhibit Space – Room 1001 next to Shambaugh Auditorium – begins on Monday, December 22nd. Workers will be installing barriers and pathways inside and outside the north entrance, with demolition also scheduled to begin next week and continue over winter break.

At this point in time, at least one north door will remain available for entry and exit, although this may be closed off at any time depending on construction. Outside the north entrance, crews will be fencing off a perimeter that will include part of the pedway and encompassing the bike rack area. The bike racks may be relocated, but no decision has been made at this time. The construction perimeter will be used to locate a crane (for roof work), a dumpster, and a trailer for management, staging, and materials.

Primary demolition work is scheduled to occur during winter break with construction continuing through August 2015. We will keep you informed as the project moves forward.

Thank you for your patience!

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Ghosts in the Stacks (and free popcorn)!

Looking for a spooky way to start off your Halloween weekend?  Craving some free, freshly popped popcorn?  Stop by the Main Library Learning Commons for a look at some of the scariest items housed in the Special Collections and University Archives department.

With items ranging from truly disturbing illustrations, to stories of local hauntings, there’s something to startle everyone.  Special Collections and University Archives will have a selection of items available for browsing to help you get your Halloween weekend off to a historic start.

Thursday, October 30, 12pm-4pm
Main Library Learning Commons, Group Area D (across from Food for Thought)

For a preview of some of our spooky items, check out our tumblr page!

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Footprints of Our International Students: Why Should We Care?

University Libraries welcomes Dr. Camile Alire, past president of America Library Association for Ada Stoflet lecture

Wednesday, October 15, 2014 at 3:00 p.m., Old Capitol Senate Chamber

Alire_300pxWho are our international students? What are some of the challenges they face studying in the U.S.?  How can we best serve them?  Dr. Camila Alire responds to these questions; shares other thoughts about/experiences with international students; the footprints they leave; and why we should care.

The University of Iowa Libraries has invited Dr. Camila Alire to give the Ada Stoflet lecture on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber. A reception in the rotunda immediately follows the presentation.

Dr. Camila Alire is the past-president of the American Library Association and Dean Emerita at the University of New Mexico and Colorado State University. Camila received her doctorate in Educational Leadership from the University of Northern Colorado and an MLS from the University of Denver.

The Ada M. Stoflet Lectureship is established in memory of Ada M. Stoflet, an exceptionally skilled and dedicated member of the University of Iowa Libraries staff for three decades. The lecture is presented on a topic of interest in the field of librarianship.

Dr. Alire maintains an outstanding record of professional service. She is also past-president the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL 2006), and as REFORMA past-president (1994).  Alire served on the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) board and chaired several committees. She speaks and consults internationally on leadership development, academic library trends, strategic planning as well as on the other topics.

Dr. Alire was honored with the following recognitions: the ALA/Lippincott Award for Distinguished Service; the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) Presidential Recognition Award, and the ALA Achievement in Library Diversity Research Award.  She was awarded the first ALA Elizabeth Futas’ Catalyst for Change award and National REFORMA’s Librarian of the Year award.  One year, she was named by Hispanic Business Magazine as one of the 100 most influential Hispanics in the country.  Alire was recently appointed by U.S. President Barrack Obama to serve on the National Council on the Humanities.