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The Practical Psychosomaticist on Open Access Week, October 22-28, 2012: Bring a Shovel

By James J. Amos, M.D.

When I was about 12 years old, I awoke to find a thick blanket of snow had covered our neighborhood. Initially I wanted to shovel a few walks for our elderly neighbors so they would have a path clear of ice and snow. Then I started thinking what I would charge my customers, imagining how much money I could make. As I calculated, I saw more and more dollar signs. Before long, the sun had gone down and it was too late to go out. No walks were shoveled and no money was made because I was too excited about the cash.

Thinking about open access publishing and copyright laws reminds me of that day in winter. Over the years I’ve had many opportunities to pick up that shovel to clear the path for others, but have been stymied by copyright. Recently a doctor from Poland requested a case report I’d published, but before I could send him the article I started worrying about who owned the copyright – me or the publisher. In the end I wasn’t at liberty to share the knowledge I’d gained to help another doctor improve the care he gives his patients.

And then there was the article I wrote that I wanted to share with all our residents. I couldn’t figure out how to without risking copyright infringement. I finally thumbtacked one of my complimentary copies to the residents’ bulletin board, which I think still has a clipping from the Eisenhower administration.

Finally, a colleague asked me if I would post his fine editorial that had been rejected by a journal on my open-access blog. I was more than happy to oblige, and I think the authors did me and my readers a remarkable service. I’m really shoveling now.

So to me, open access is all about sharing what I learn with other clinicians. The goal is improving patient care, in my book. That’s what my blog is all about. What you find there is free and open access. You can help.

Bring a shovel.

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OA Publishing Platforms with Don Share, Sr. Editor of Poetry Magazine, Oct 29 at 3pm

Open access publishing’s place in the humanities is uncertain at the moment, and knowledge of it will be important going forward in resolving inequitable relationships between presses and authors, journal vendors and libraries, and publishers and readers. The University of Iowa Libraries has invited  Don Share, senior editor of Poetry magazine, to talk about open access publishing platforms and contemporary humanities literature and scholarship.

Monday, October 29th at 3pm
Illinois Room of the Iowa Memorial Union
(Share will also be giving a poetry reading at Prairie Lights in the evening, at 7 pm.)

In 2002, Ruth Lilly, heiress to the Lilly pharmaceutical fortune, left Poetry magazine 100 million dollars upon her death, and among the things Poetry has done with the Lilly bequest is go open access. Each month the magazine publishes a print issue, as it has been doing for 100 years, and since 2003 it has simultaneously made each issue’s contents freely available on its website (see http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/). Don Share was one of the principle architects of this initiative, and he is in a unique position to discuss how literature and humanities scholarship function on an open access platform.

Don Share is Senior Editor of Poetry magazine. His books include Squandermania (Salt Publishing), Union (Zoo Press), Seneca in English (Penguin Classics), and most recently a new book of poems, Wishbone (Black Sparrow), and Bunting’s Persia (Flood Editions); he has also edited a critical edition of Bunting’s work for Faber and Faber. His translations of Miguel Hernández, collected in I Have Lots of Heart (Bloodaxe Books) were awarded the Times Literary Supplement Translation Prize and Premio Valle Inclán, and will appear in a revised edition from NYRB Classics. He has been Poetry Editor of Harvard Review and Partisan Review, Editor of Literary Imagination, and curator of poetry at Harvard University. With Christian Wiman, he co-hosts the monthly Poetry magazine podcast and has co-editedThe Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine (University of Chicago Press). For his work at Poetry he has earned two National Magazine Awards for Editorial Excellence.

Praise for Don Share’s poems:

“Don Share’s work is compressed as a haiku, intent as a tanka, witty as a sonnet, witless as a song, relentless as an expose, patter without pretension . . . his elegant poetry, exposed as a haiku, expansive as a renga, boisterous as a bridge, happy as Delmore Schwartz with Lou Reed and vice versa, vivacious as the living day . . . built out of attention, music and sight.” -David Shapiro “Share is one of the more gifted craftsmen we have writing in America today.” -Erin Belieu, Boston Review

“Few poets manage such dexterous and fresh music.” -Alice Fulton Praise for The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine (University of Chicago Press)

“If readers would like to sample the genius and diversity of American poetry in the last century, there’s no better place to start than The Open Door.” (World Literature Today)

“A high-wire anthology of electric resonance. . . . The editors then arranged these redefining poems by poets of the pantheon and poets overlooked, underrated, or new in pairings and sequences of thrilling contrapuntal dynamics. Wiman’s opening essay is titled ‘Mastery and Mystery,’ and those are, indeed, the forces at work here, inducing readers to marvel anew at the strange impulse to write poetry and the profound effort required to do it well.” (Booklist)

“With this collection, Share and Wiman want only to promote the art of poetry, something they do exceedingly well. Highly recommended.” (Library Journal, starred review )

“A wonderful anthology. . . . In many ways this is a wonderfully democratic anthology–to get in, you don’t have to be famous, you just need to be good.” (National Post, Canada)

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Open Access Week 2012

The University of Iowa Libraries joins thousands of other academic research libraries worldwide in celebration of International Open Access Week. To draw attention to this important issue facing faculty, students and librarians, we’re turning our website orange in recognition of open access.

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

OA Week creates an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.

To participate in OA week, do one or more of the following:

  • Visit the University of Iowa’s Open Access web page and learn more about what OA is and how you can participate in making scholarship more freely available.
  • Look at a list of open access articles authored by UI faculty and staff.
  • Follow the Library News this week to hear what UI faculty and others think about OA and how they are becoming part of the solution.
  • Join us on Monday, October 29 at 3pm to hear Don Share, Senior Editor of Poetry Magazine talk about how one of the leading poetry magazines in the country went Open Access.
  • Take a few minutes to learn more about copyright and the importance of retaining rights to your published work.  What does the last publication agreement you signed allow you to do with your work?
  • Deposit pre-prints, post-prints and associated data files in Iowa’s institutional repository: Iowa Research Online (ir.uiowa.edu).

 

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Banned Books Week 2012

Banned Books Week (September 30-October 6) is an annual celebration of the freedom to read. This is the 30th year of Banned Books Week, and UI Libraries is celebrating on Tumblr: http://bannedbooksweek2012.tumblr.com/. Check out updates about challenged books, submit a photo of your favorite banned or challenged book, and learn more about censorship and the freedom to read.

Banned Books Week 2012

You can get more information about Banned Books Week at http://www.ala.org/advocacy/banned, including a list of the 100 most frequently challenged books by decade.

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UI Librarian, Jennifer DeBerg, Receives Arthur Benton Award

Jennifer DeBerg is recipient of the Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services Professional Development Award. This award is given biennially to a University Libraries’ professional staff member who has demonstrated outstanding commitment in providing reference service for the university community. The honor includes a $1,000 stipend to be used for professional development activities related to the advancement of reference services.

The University Libraries will have a special celebration to honor Jen. Please join us.

Wednesday, September 26 at 3:00 p.m.
Room 401 of the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

Jen was nominated by Patricia Clinton, Clinical Professor and Assistant Dean in the College of Nursing, who notes that she is “eager to work with nurses and took the lead in a recent publication that will assist practicing nurses search for best practices. This is critical if nurses are contributing to better health outcomes for patients. Indeed the confidence one gains from standing solidly on the evidence cannot be stressed enough.”

Students value her “willingness to communicate and make herself available to the needs of students [which] far exceeded my expectations.” Andy Whitters, College of Nursing student also commented that she helped him “build many meaningful and statistically valid resources for many assignments. Her knowledge of infomatics, data retrieval and library science are outstanding.”

Jen also has worked extensively with Clinical Associate Professor Tess Judge-Ellis. “Jen’s involvement goes above and beyond. Her assistance and commitment to [our] objectives has made the experience really memorable for the students.”

Clinton also noted that “library orientations have been known to be dry and perhaps a little boring? Not Jen’s orientation! She makes the library warm and welcoming and just the place to find the answers you are looking for. Each request for help receives the same high standard of service. This is clearly her passion and not just a job.”

Jen joins Dottie Persson, John Forys, Kathy Magarrell, Kären Mason, Dave Martin and John Schacht as recipients of this award.

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Intriguing Ink: Newspapers and Pamphlets from 1812

What was happening in the world of print in 1812? Special Collections & University Archives are hosting an open house featuring the newspapers, pamphlets, and books published in 1812. This event is part of the series of 1812 events around Iowa City for the 200th anniversary of both Napoleon’s failed campaign in Russia and the War of 1812.

Friday, September 14
4-6:30 p.m.
Special Collections Reading Room, Third Floor, Main Library

Check the UNESCO City of Literature website for the full list of 1812 events.

 

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Pathways to Iowa – Exhibit Opening, Sept 12 at noon

Join Iowa Women’s Archives Curator Kären Mason and faculty members Omar Valerio-Jiménez and Claire Fox for a brown-bag discussion of Iowa women’s history at the opening of the newest exhibit at the UI Main Library.

“Pathways to Iowa:  Migration Stories from the Iowa Women’s Archives” explores a theme common to many of the collections: migration. Since its founding, the Iowa Women’s Archives has gathered documents, photos, and oral histories that illuminate the lives of diverse Iowa women. Through the day-to-day work of the Archives and projects to preserve Latina, African-American, and rural women’s history, the Archives has opened up new avenues of research and laid the foundation for a more complete history of Iowa, the Midwest, and the nation.

Bring your lunch. Cookies and iced tea will be served.

The exhibition is free and open to the public during regular Main Library hours through November 30, 2012.

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Zine Library Day

July is International Zine Month and July 21 is Zine Library Day, a chance to celebrate self-publishing collections around the world. Zines are self-published works, made for passion rather than for profit. Libraries collect zines because they represent perspectives and topics that aren’t included in other forms of media.

The zine collections in the UI Libraries are in Special Collections and University Archives. You can learn more about them here. There is even a zine about the zine collections, which you can always find in the Zine Machine, the zine vending machine on the first floor in Main Library.

There are other zine libraries in the Midwest, as well, including:

-     The Read/Write Library in Chicago.

-     The Zine Apothecary in Minneapolis.

-     Michigan State University Special Collections in East Lansing.

Finally, a few zine libraries on the move or online:

-     The Queer Zine Archive Project is a collectively-run initiative to digitize zines by and about queer people.

-     The Fly Away Zinemobile is a traveling collection of zines. Check their website – they’ll probably be stopping through Iowa City in August.

To celebrate Zine Library Day, come down to psz downstairs at 120 N. Dubuque on July 21 between noon and 6pm. There will be a pop-up zine library, materials to make your own zines, and snacks, of course. At 6, we will parade the three blocks to Public Space One to use their copier. You can RSVP on Facebook.

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A Nancy Drew birthday

Nancy Drew author Mildred Wirt Benson among her books, Toledo, 1949 | Mildred Wirt Benson Collection

Nancy Drew author Mildred Wirt Benson among her books, Toledo, 1949 | Mildred Wirt Benson Collection

University of Iowa alumna Mildred Wirt Benson — journalist, pilot, amateur archaeologist, ghost writer, and the original author of the Nancy Drew mystery series — was born on this day in 1905. To mark the anniversary, we’re featuring a gallery of her book covers, from the iconic to the unintentionally terrifying, on our Iowa Digital Library Pinterest account. View even more digitized artifacts at the Mildred Wirt Benson Digital Collection.

Pinterst - IDL: Mildred Wirt Benson cover gallery

Pinterst - IDL: Mildred Wirt Benson cover gallery

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UBorrow wins resource sharing innovation award

UBorrow—the new service that offers rapid access to over 90 million books from 13 research libraries—has won the Rethinking Resource Sharing 2012 Innovation Award.

David Larsen of the University of Chicago Library and Anne Beaubien of the University of Michigan accepted the award on behalf of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation—a consortium of Big Ten member universities plus the University of Chicago.  The award comes with a $1000 stipend and honors individuals or institutions for changes they have made to improve users’ access to information through resource sharing in their library, consortium, state or country.

The University of Iowa was one of 5 pilot libraries that tested and implemented UBorrow in late 2010/early 2011.  Amy Paulus, Head, Access Services at the Main Library worked closely with these libraries as a member of  the implementation team.

UBorrow allows University of Iowa faculty, students and staff to borrow books from other CIC institutions, which typically arrive on campus within a week and can be checked out for 12 weeks, with an option for a 4-week renewal. Visit the UBorrow Library Guide to learn more about using this service.