Faculty News Category

0

Takedown Notices from Publishers: What are your rights?

Chris Diaz, Residency Librarian, Scholarly Communications & Collections
Karen Fischer, Collections Analysis Librarian

You may have read in the Washington Post or the Chronicle of Higher Education that users of Academia.edu have had their research papers taken down from their profile pages. Elsevier, the largest publisher of journals in the Scientific, Technical, and Medical fields, has been sending takedown notices to third-party websites, like Academia.edu, hosting research articles published in their journals. As the copyright holder, Elsevier is within their rights to do this because publishing agreements often give them the exclusive right to sell and distribute the article, thus prohibiting sharing of those articles by the author or anyone else.

The University of Iowa Libraries offers a number of options to support and encourage the permissible posting of research articles online. As the author of an original research paper, you can decide how you want your findings to reach your audience. By publishing in an academic journal, you are within your rights to negotiate for terms that suit your needs. One way to do this is to attach the University of Iowa’s Author’s Addendum to your next publishing agreement. This addendum preserves your right to share your work online through a personal website or Iowa Research Online, the University’s open access archive for scholarship. Iowa Research Online is a free resource for making scholarship available online and preserved in perpetuity by the Libraries. In addition to hosting and preserving research articles, Iowa Research Online accepts conference proceedings, presentations, and multimedia to meet the diverse methods by which scholars share their work.

If you have received a takedown notice from a publisher or have any questions about copyright or publishing agreements, please contact your librarian for assistance. To learn more about the University Libraries’ publishing services, please visit our informative guides on Scholarly Publishing issues and Copyright. We look forward to helping you in your scholarly endeavors.

0

Millions of Titles to Borrow

Amy Paulus, Head of Access Services

Looking for books not available or not owned by the University Libraries?  Try UBorrow! A book found in UBorrow will be delivered quickly from one of 15 research libraries (Big Ten Universities plus Center for Research Libraries, University of Chicago, Maryland, and Rutgers), arriving within one week of request.

You can use these materials for 12 weeks, a much longer loan period than a traditional interlibrary loan, without the fear of having it recalled from you. A four week renewal is also an option. If you discover materials through UBorrow that are not available, the interlibrary loan option is presented and staff will request from other libraries. To further simplify, these requests can be tracked and managed along with the rest of your interlibrary loan requests through the ILL system: https://uiowa.illiad.oclc.org/illiad/illiad.dll.  To ensure your request will be submitted automatically, you should log-in to the ILL system before performing searches in UBorrow.  For further information, instructions, tutorials, and a link to UBorrow, see the UBorrow libguide at http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/uborrow.

0

Research Resources Your Students Need in Subject Specific Guides

Ericka Raber, Research & Instruction Librarian

With the wealth of information resources available, students often need help finding the information they need for research projects and papers. Libguides are selective lists of subscription databases, books, journals, and other resources available through the UI Libraries.

Libguides are easily accessible from the Libraries’ website and ICON course pages. ICON’s “Library Resources” link leads to the subject libguide for each department so, for example, students in Political Science courses are guided to: http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/polisci.

Librarians can also develop course-specific libguides to help students locate quality resources for class assignments. These guides can help students at various stages of the research process, from developing a topic to citing their sources in perfect APA style. Libguides can also include dynamic features such as Twitter streams and RSS feeds.

Some recent course-specific libguides:

Libguides are available for a variety of resources, including Dissertations, Newspapers, Evidence Based Practice, Mobile Device Resources, and Citation Formats.

Usage reports provide data on how libguides are being used and which libguides get the most traffic. Statistics can also help editors refresh the guides to better meet research needs.

То learn more about using a libguide for your class, contact your librarian.