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Finding Evidence-Based Resources

This class will focus on creating a clinical question using PICO, the difference between publication types, and the different resources where one can find evidence based information. The class will also discuss the difference between searching Cochrane, PubMed, National Guideline Clearinghouse and UpToDate. This session will be hands-on and is free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, April 1, 9-10 am

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, WEST Information Commons classroom

Register here. Contact us with questions or concerns at (319) 335-9151 or by email at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

Image via mclibrary.duke.edu

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Open Access: Policies, Publishers, and Predators

Open Access to scientific literature is one of the most hotly debated topics in scholarly publishing. This workshop will provide an overview of what scientists need to know when making their research open access. We will cover the basics of what we mean by open access, how open access relates to the NIH Public Access policy, open access journals in the biomedical sciences, predatory publishing scams, and best practices for evaluating your open access options.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, March 31, 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons

Register here.

Image via openscience.com

Questions? Contact us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.

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Ibn Butlan’s Tacuini Sanitatis (1531)

The Maintenance of<br /><br /><br />
The Maintenance of Health by Ibn ButlanImage via the guardian.com, credit Royal Society

This images are from a 14th century translation of Arabic doctor Ibn Butlan, who died circa 1068. Butlan’s title roughly translates to “health report.” The report addresses the impact of nature, emotional states, daily life, and meteorological conditions on health. Butlan wrote that his book concerned “the six things that are necessary for every man in the daily preservation of his health.” These included:

1. “The treatment of air, which concerns the heart.”

2. “The right use of foods and drinks.”

3. “The correct use of movement and rest.”

4. “The problem of prohibiting excessive wakefulness.”

5. “The correct use of elimination and retention of humors.”

6. “The regulating of the person by moderating joy, anger, fear, and distress.”

Illustration from the 15th century edition of Tacuinum Sanitatis by Ibn Butlan.Wine. Image via offi.fr                                                                                                                        Making spaghetti. Image via spaghettiforever.wordpress.com

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John Martin Rare Book Room Open House March 27

The University of Library History of Medicine Society invites you to

Incunabula in a Medical Context

Open House

Thursday, March 27, 4:30-7 pm

  Incunabula are early printed books dating from 1450 to 1500, immediately after the introduction of the printing press.

The John Martin Rare Book Room at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences will be opening its doors on the evening of Thursday, March 27 to let guests take a stroll through the 15th century.  Attendees will be allowed to page through and photograph our 32 incunabula along with select medieval manuscripts and facsimiles (copies), from 1500-1520.

To learn more, visit the Rare Book Room site. Contact Rare Book Room Curator Donna Hirst at (319) 335-9154 or by email at donna-hirst@uiowa.edu.

Don’t miss this chance for a unique glimpse into centuries-old medical scholarship!

Image via lib.cam.ac.uk

Incunabula page from the editio princeps of Lactantius (Italy, 1465).

Manuscript belongs to Cambridge University Library’s Incunabula Project.

 

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Medical Literature Express

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This 30-minute session will show you how to find relevant articles fast using some of the basic features in PubMed. This class is free for UI students and affiliates.

Our next session is:

Thursday, March 27

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences (EAST Information Commons classroom)

Sign up here. Pressed for time? Check out our tutorial for basic searching tips.

Image via laikaspoetnik.wordpress.com

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PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, March 25 from 9-10 am

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences (EAST Information Commons classroom)

Register today or check out our quick tutorial for the basics on PubMed.

Need help? Contact us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.

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Web-based Citation Management with EndNote Basic

EndNote Basic is a web-based citation management software that is freely available to all UI affiliates. It allows you to import, organize and format citations for papers, articles, etc. EndNote Basic is not the same as EndNote Desktop software.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, March 24 from 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences (EAST Information Commons Classroom)

To register, click here. For more on EndNote Basic, see our quick and easy tutorial.

Questions? Email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or call (319) 335-9151.

EndNote is available in several formats. [Image via endnote.com]

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Research Gene Expression, Functional Genomics, and More with our Gene Expression Databases Workshop

This session provides an overview of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases that contain information on gene expressions. Learn how to search for homologous gene sets for selected organisms, clusters of expressed transcripts, gene expression and molecular abundance profiles, functional genomics studies and epigenomic studies and display tools.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, March 18, 9-10 am

Location: Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register here. Contact us at 335-9151 or lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

For one-on-one instruction, see a librarian liaison.

 

Image via: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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Join us Thursday, March 20 for a discussion on Mobile Apps and Devices

Want to share your favorite app with the world? Wonder what apps are out there for your work and your personal life?

This is your chance to learn and share, not get technical support.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates.

Our next session takes place:

Thursday, March 20 from 3-4 pm

Location: Hardin Library East Information Commons

Sign up here or contact Hardin at (319) 335-9151 or by emailing lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

Image via technology.digital.com

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Celebrate Pi Day with University Libraries

Do you like Pi?

Pi is celebrated globally on March 14. This date was chosen because it represents the first three digits of Pi (3.14). Pi is a Greek symbol which represents a constant– the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, or 3.14159. Pi can be calculated beyond a million digits without repeating itself and has no predicable pattern.

To celebrate Pi and its importance for science and math, Hardin, along with the Main, Art, Business, Engineering, and Sciences Libraries on campus will be handing out free pies along with coffee and lemonade. This event will take place on Friday, March 14 at 10 am. Get yours while supplies last!

To learn more, visit piday.org.

 

Image via wikipedia.org

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