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Introduction to Toxicology Resources @Hardin Library

The purpose of this session is to introduce you to various environmental health and toxicology resources found on the National Library of Medicine’s website. Learn about important resources such as the Household Products Database, TOXMAP and TOXNET. The resources discussed in this session will be of interest to the researcher/scientist, health professional and the general public.

Our free workshops this semester:

Wednesday, September 24, 3-4pm Hardin Library Information Commons East

Tuesday, December 2, 1-2pm Hardin Library Information Commons East

 

Register online or request a personal session, or call 319-335-9151 to register.

household products database

 

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Learn tips for searching Gene, Nucleotide Sequences & Protein Information @Hardin Library this fall

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Instructor Chris Childs Clinical Education and Outreach Librarian

Overwhelmed by the number of databases that the National Center for Biotechnology Information has to offer on nucleotide sequences, genes and proteins?
Wondering which database you should always start with?
Would you like to learn how to set up an NCBI account to link articles in PubMed to records in other databases?
Do you know about PubMed’s Gene Sensor? Are you familiar with the concept of linear navigation?

Learn all of these tips and more in this session that is designed for anyone who needs to search the NCBI databases for genetic information.

Our sessions this fall:

Thursday, September 18, 10:00 – 11:00 am (Location: East Information Commons, 2nd floor, Hardin Library)

Tuesday, October 7, 2:00 – 3:00 pm (Location: East Information Commons)

Tuesday, November 4, 10:00 – 11:00 am (Location: East Information Commons)

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ .  You can also request a personal session if none of these times work for you!

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Learn how to use EndNote Basic Friday, September 5, 11am-12pm

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Instructor Chris Childs, Outreach Librarian

EndNote is a reference management tool that helps you to easily gather together your references in one place, organize them, and then insert them into papers and format them in a style of your choosing. This session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format your citations. The class will be hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/  for this or any of our other open workshops.  You can also request a personalized session!

Just need a little help?  See our guide for EndNote Basic.

 

 

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Nominate Your Librarian for UI Libraries Arthur Benton Excellence Award

The University Libraries is seeking nominations for the Arthur Benton University Librarian’s Award for Excellence. Funded by a generous endowment, this prestigious award acknowledges a library staff member’s professional contributions in the practice of librarianship, service to the profession, scholarship, or leadership which has had a significant impact or innovation to the operations of the Libraries or the University of Iowa.

 

Nominate your librarian!  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/admin/files/BentonNominationForm.pdf
The deadline is Friday, September 26.

 

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Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Services

Our interlibrary loan department delivers thousands of books and journal articles to patrons each year at no cost. Last year, our interlibrary loan staff borrowed over 6,000 items on behalf of our patrons and lent over 12,000 items from our collection to other libraries!

Services also include document delivery, we’ll locate items in our collection, such as journal articles or book chapters, and scan and deliver the content to you electronically. This is a popular service; our staff delivered over 5,000 items through document delivery last year.

To place a request or get more information, please visit our site at: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/illa/.

All interlibrary loan and document delivery services are free to our students, faculty and staff.

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Labor Day Weekend Hours @Hardin Library

The Hardin Library has reduced hours of the Labor Day weekend.

Saturday, August 30 CLOSED Home football game
Sunday, August 31 Open Noon-9pm
Monday, September 1 CLOSED Labor Day holiday
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Learn PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics @Hardin Library Tuesday 9/2

picture of Amy Blevins

Librarian Instructor Amy Blevins

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences.  This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session is:
September 2, 1:00-2:00pm, Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register for this or any of our workshops online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ or by calling 319-335-9151.  You may also request a personal session online.

 

pubmed graphic

 

 

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ClinicalKey now working with Internet Explorer version 11

link to clinicalkeyClinicalKey now works with v. 11 of Internet Explorer, as well as other browsers.  Last week ClinicalKey was not working with IE 11 due to a Microsoft upgrade.

If you have trouble accessing ClinicalKey, please give us a call at 319-335-9151.

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Embase Now Available

Embase, an important biomedical database, is now available for all University of Iowa users. Sometimes called the “European MEDLINE,” Embase is another resource for supporting evidence-based medicine, the creation of systematic reviews, and, particularly, pharmacology-related information.

Embase can be accessed from the Health Sciences Resources page.  For assistance in searching Embase, contact your Hardin liaison.

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Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room – Jean Pecquet

picture of dissection

from JEAN PECQUET (1622-1674). Experimenta nova anatomica, quibus incognitum hactenus chyli receptaculum, & ab eo per thoracem in ramos usque subclavios vasa lactea deteguntur. Paris: Apud Sebastianum Cramoisy et Gabrielem Cramoisy, 1651.

At the beginning of the 17th century, it was widely believed that food was converted into blood as it passed through the digestive system. The blood was then carried to the liver where it was imbued with natural spirits and passed on to the heart for distribution through the body. Since only the blood vessels were known to the anatomists of that day, it was thought that chyle, the product of digestion, was transported to the liver by the venous system of the intestines.

This notion was corrected by Gaspare Aselli in 1627 when, by accident, he discovered the lacteal vessels in the mesentery of a dog. He incorrectly surmised that the lacteal vessels empty their contents into the liver. It was not until 1651 that Pecquet reported his discovery of the receptaculum chyli and thoracic duct. He accurately described the lacteal veins of Aselli and showed that they terminate in the receptaculum chyli and that the thoracic duct joins the venous systems at the junction of the jugular and subclavian veins.

Joannes van Horne made the same discovery quite independently and corroborated Pecquet’s findings. Later Pecquet’s work was confirmed and extended to cover the entire lymphatic system by Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702) and Thomas Bartholin. The copperplate engraving clearly depicts the main lymphatic system both in a separate figure and in the dissected abdomen and thorax of a dog.