About Author: The University of Iowa Libraries

Posts by The University of Iowa Libraries

0

Pathways to Iowa – Exhibit Opening, Sept 12 at noon

Join Iowa Women’s Archives Curator Kären Mason and faculty members Omar Valerio-Jiménez and Claire Fox for a brown-bag discussion of Iowa women’s history at the opening of the newest exhibit at the UI Main Library.

“Pathways to Iowa:  Migration Stories from the Iowa Women’s Archives” explores a theme common to many of the collections: migration. Since its founding, the Iowa Women’s Archives has gathered documents, photos, and oral histories that illuminate the lives of diverse Iowa women. Through the day-to-day work of the Archives and projects to preserve Latina, African-American, and rural women’s history, the Archives has opened up new avenues of research and laid the foundation for a more complete history of Iowa, the Midwest, and the nation.

Bring your lunch. Cookies and iced tea will be served.

The exhibition is free and open to the public during regular Main Library hours through November 30, 2012.

0

Learning Commons @ your library

In the fall of 2013, University of Iowa students will discover a tech-infused, 24-hour, comfy study space and one-stop academic help center…with good coffee.

Designed with significant student input, the new Learning Commons will provide an “intellectual hub” with room for 500-plus students. The 37,000-square-foot facility in the Main Library is the product of a unique partnership among Information Technology Services (ITS), University Libraries, and the Office of the Provost.

“The Learning Commons is focused, first and foremost, on furthering the academic success of students,” says Nancy Baker, university librarian. “The staff will provide students with a ‘concierge’ experience. They’ll answer common academic, library, and technology questions and point students to the resources they need to succeed, like help with their research, writing, or tutoring.”

VIDEO: Learning Commons Walkthrough

“Our design team spent a lot of time watching how students study, and particularly noticed how much they leveraged technology in their daily work habits,” says Chris Clark, ITS learning spaces director. “This space, with its multimedia resources, collaboration technologies, and wall-to-wall wireless, reflects the way today’s students integrate technology into their lives.”

Features of the project include 18 group study spaces, 100 desktop and laptop computers, a 45-seat TILE (Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage) classroom with glass walls and sliding doors, printers and scanners, TVs and projectors, and multimedia resources.

The design team also considered students’ stomachs, because students can’t concentrate on their studies when they’re hungry. The Food for Thought café will offer an expanded menu that includes hot panini sandwiches, fruit smoothies, and other snacks, as well as espresso and gourmet coffees.

“We want to create an ambience that welcomes students,” Clark says.

According to Beth Ingram, associate provost for undergraduate education, the most important feature of the space is its flexibility.

“The Learning Commons is many different kinds of study spaces and services rolled into one,” she says. “With technology, information, and expertise combined in one location, it’s a space where students can study with a group or by themselves; where they can have a coffee with friends and then go to a workshop on stress management; where they know they can get answers to questions about information resources, technology, or tutoring services.”

Of course, part of the challenge in creating such a massive space for students is minimizing the impact the construction process will have on daily student life. Hope Barton, associate university librarian, says the impact on current study spaces will be minimal, since the area being remodeled was office space.

“This will really be a fantastic resource for University of Iowa students,” Ingram says. “We’re excited to see the project come to completion so students can start making the most of the new space.”

0

Furniture is Here!

Many of Main Library staff on the first floor will be moving to renovated space on the fifth to make room for Learning Commons. The fifth floor space has been under construction since early spring and today the furniture is being moved in.

The movers will be using the southeast elevator (D) to transport the furniture upstairs. Please use the other elevators or stairs in the building. Thanks.

1

Harry Potter and the Quest for Enlightenment

Dragons, mandrakes, and potions have taken over the cases outside Special Collections & University Archives!

Students in Donna Parsons’ Honors Seminar titled “Harry Potter and the Quest for Enlightenment” have curated an exhibit using materials from Special Collections. The exhibit is one part of a semester long project utilizing Special Collections materials for research. The students chose one item from the collection to represent their research and worked together to fit their items into themes for display.

Parsons’ seminar has the students closely read the texts and analyze their themes as well as investigate the influences from the literary canon and the effects on popular culture in the US and Britain. She envisioned the collaboration with Special Collections as an exciting opportunity to enhance student learning. “The Harry Potter series is filled with extensive references to science, literature, mythology, and history,” Parsons says. “Partnering with Special Collections has supplied my students with the resources needed to trace a specific reference and discuss its relevance to a particular scene, character, or plotline. The partnership has also provided the context for a deeper understanding of the series and its appeal to a diverse audience.”

Greg Prickman, Head of Special Collections & University Archives, welcomed the collaboration. “The idea to have the students create an exhibition was Donna’s, and we quickly agreed to it. Rather than showing or telling, we are giving them the chance to do their own showing and telling, which results in a unique learning opportunity that can only be experienced with access to original historical documents.”

Kelsey Sheets, a student in the seminar, loved finding out how complex the world of Harry Potter really is. “In the past I have read books about how J.K. Rowling draws inspiration from a wide variety of historical and mythical sources and incorporates them into the series, but my own research [on links between the study of Potions and the muggle study of Chemistry] really solidified this point and made me appreciate the depth of the wizarding world.”

The exhibit will be on display until June 1st on the third floor of the Main Library outside Special Collections & University Archives anytime the library is open.

0

Significant Science Fiction Collection comes to the University of Iowa Libraries

Collection encompasses 100 years of material.

The University of Iowa Libraries has acquired a significant collection of pulp magazines, fanzines, and science fiction books owned by the late James L. “Rusty” Hevelin. The collection encompasses nearly one hundred years of material, documenting in great detail the development of science fiction, popular culture, and participatory fan culture in the United States during the twentieth century.

Rusty Hevelin began collecting pulp magazines in the 1930s when they were a popular item on newsstands. Pulps were cheaply produced weekly fiction magazines. They were the training ground for many of the most famous science fiction writers like Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.   The collection contains thousands of pulps, ranging from the early Thrilling Wonder Stories, the eclectic Weird Tales, character titles such as The Shadow, The Spider, and Doc Savage, and many examples of mystery, western, and aviation pulps.    “This vast collection of material rarely collected by traditional libraries is a goldmine for teachers and scholars,” said Corey Creekmur, UI Associate Professor of English and Film Studies. “Pulp magazines were central to mid- 20th century American popular culture, but their ephemerality has made them rare and inaccessible for later readers. The arrival of this collection makes Iowa a major archive for future research in this area.”

Fanzines push science fiction genre

Readers of pulps began communicating with one another through the letter columns in each issue, and this back-and-forth exchange soon developed into fanzines, which fans produced on home mimeograph or other printers, and distributed through the mail and at conventions. The collection is particularly rich in the early years of science fiction fanzines, including several titles that Hevelin produced.

Science fiction grew out of the pulps and into mainstream publishing, and the Hevelin collection documents this process in thousands of hardcover and paperback science fiction books. First editions of Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, and other writers are included, along with many paperback novels. Together, these materials depict the great diversity of styles in science fiction as the genre evolved.

“The Hevelin collection presents a rare opportunity to study the development of this genre, as seen in many of its most important formats, through the lens of a single collector,” says Greg Prickman, Head of Special Collections & University Archives. “Fans like Rusty weren’t just fanzine writers, or pulp collectors, or science fiction readers, they were all of these things, and Rusty’s collection shows how these materials interact with one another.”

The University of Iowa Libraries is home to internationally significant science fiction collections. Holdings include the Horvat Collection of Science Fiction Fanzines, the Ming Wathne Fanzine Archive Collection, and a growing body of materials resulting from the Fan Culture Preservation Project, a partnership with the Organization for Transformative Works.

0

Jennifer DeBerg wins Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services Professional Development Award

Jennifer DeBerg, Clinical Education Librarian at Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, was awarded the Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services Professional Development Award for 2012. Jennifer received kudos from nursing students, research colleagues, faculty and staff in her nomination letter

The award is given biennially to a University Libraries professional staff member who has demonstrated outstanding commitment in providing reference services for the University community. The $1,000 award, made possible by a generous endowment from Dr. Arthur Benton, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, will support a professional development activity related to the advancement of library reference services.

Jennifer is a librarian liaison to Communication Sciences & Disorders, Family Medicine, College of Nursing, Nursing Services and Patient Care, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Otolaryngology, Pediatrics, Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science, and Rehab Therapies & Rehab Counseling.

0

Annual R. Palmer Howard Dinner : Spot Ward, Crazy Sally, and the Chevalier Taylor: Three Medical Quacks in 18th Century Britain

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society announces the R. Palmer Howard Dinner for 2012, Friday, April 13, 2012, 6:00-9:30.

Lynda Payne, prof. in Medical Humanities & Bioethics, and History, University of Missouri Kansas City will speak on “Spot Ward, Crazy Sally, and the Chevalier Taylor: Three Medical Quacks in Eighteenth-Century Britain”.

Reception, dinner and lecture will be at the Sheraton Hotel. Make your reservations now but no later than April 6 with Donna Sabin, 319-335-6706, donna-sabin@uiowa.edu Online form (print & mail): http://hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/histmed/index.html. Seats for the lecture only will be available.

0

Sisters, There’s a Women’s Center in Iowa City!

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Women’s Resource and Action Center with a piece of cake and a lively discussion of the early days of WRAC and the women’s liberation movement in Iowa City.  Panelists will include Sondra Smith, Gayle Sand, Sandy Pickup, Jill Jack, with Laurie Haag moderating.   

Friday, March 23, 2012
4:00-6:00 p.m.
Iowa Women’s Archives
3rd floor, Main Library, University of Iowa

0

Celebrate Pi Day (belatedly) at the Libraries on March 19

Pi, Greek letter, is the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi Day is celebrated by math enthusiasts around the world on March 14th. Pi = 3.1415926535…. Pi is used in many different fields and can be seen in our everyday lives. It may be seen in art, structural design, body mobility, navigation, and probability. To celebrate the versatility of this number, the various campus libraries will celebrate at the same time, showing how pi is used in their subject areas.

Due to March 14th being during spring break, the celebration will take place next Monday, March 19th at 3:14 p.m.

Events will be held at the following libraries: Art, Pomerantz Business, Lichtenberger Engineering, Hardin, Main (near the Information Desk), Music, and Sciences. Join us at any of these locations to learn more about pi and have some apple pie bites.

0

Learn how to manage and share your research sources with Zotero at free workshop

Collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources with Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh], a free, easy-to-use web browser tool. Learn more at our hands on session and start gathering your materials in Zotero right away.

Tuesday, February 28th, 3:00-4:00pm
Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, East Information Commons

Sign up for this class online: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/regform.html or by calling 319-335-9151.

Get more information about Zotero or download it for free online: http://www.zotero.org.