Learn to save and use your citations and make bibliographies | EndNote Basic workshop @Hardin Library | Wed., March 29, 1-2pm

picture of instructor

Instructor Chris Childs, Outreach Librarian

EndNote Basic is a web-based citation management software that is freely available to all UI faculty, students and staff. EndNote Basic allows you to search, save and use your reference sources.  EndNote Basic integrates with Microsoft Word to help you cite and format your paper.  You can store and organize up to 50,000 references.

Get an EndNote Basic account

Workshop Wednesday, March 29, 1-2pm, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

Register for workshop

No time for class?  See our helpful guide!

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

Posted in Uncategorized

News & Updates 3/22/2017

Iowa Bibliophiles browsing new acquisitions  March News & Updates: Old Gold: 1962 campus concert featured both Al Jarreau and Simon Estes https://now.uiowa.edu/2017/03/old-gold-1962-campus-concert-featured-both-al-jarreau-and-simon-estes Johnson County Historical Society event puts focus on historic and rare films […]
Posted in Uncategorized

Underserved Health Communities Project | Greater Midwest Region | National Libraries of Medicine

The Greater Midwest Region National Network of Libraries of Medicine at Hardin Library has launched the Underserved Health Communities Project which is an interactive map showing data and stories related to twenty medically underserved counties within the ten state Greater Midwest Region which includes Iowa.

The project includes an interactive map that highlights these twenty counties with the highest risk for health factors and behaviors according to the 2016 County Health Rankings and Roadmaps.

sample of interactive map

Posted in Uncategorized

Every Girl Has a Voice: 8-14 Year Old Girls Explore IWA

Quilt squares about Iowa women, by Iowa girls.Quilt squares about Iowa women, by Iowa girls.

Every girl has a voice. Every woman has a story!

This month the IWA held an event for area girls from ages 8 – 14. The girls learned about Iowa girls and women from decades past like Dora Martin Berry, the first black student to be named Miss State University of Iowa; Dorothy Fox Wurster, who joined the local boys 4-H club in order to competitively show cattle; and Phyliss Henry, Des Moines’ first police woman.
Using photocopies of what they found, the kids made their own mini-exhibits and decorated a quilt square about a girl or woman of their choice.

All who participated had a blast, and we hope to have a similar event in the future.

 

The girls examine our current exhibit "History as it Happens: Women's March 2017

The girls examine our current exhibit “History as it Happens: Women’s March 2017

Curator Kären Mason shows the girls some artifacts from IWA collections.

Curator Kären Mason shows the girls some artifacts from IWA collections.

Assistant curator Janet Weaver helps a girl write her exhibit caption, "And the women powered through it!"

Assistant curator Janet Weaver helps a girl write her exhibit caption, “And the women powered through it!”

Quilt squares about Iowa women, by Iowa girls.

Quilt squares about Iowa women, by Iowa girls.

Posted in Uncategorized

American Civil War Research Database – Trial ends 21 May 2017

The American Civil War Research Database is a definitive online resource for researching individuals, regiments, and battles of the American Civil War. It delivers indexed, searchable information on 4.3 million soldiers and thousands of battles in the form of photographs, regimental rosters, regimental chronicles, officer profiles, and more.

Please send additional comments to Janalyn Moss.

Posted in Uncategorized

Always losing your computer files? File naming workshop | Thurs. March 23, 1-2pm

Chris Childs, Education and Outreach Librarian

Have you ever accidently lost or deleted your old files? Have you ever had trouble locating the current version among multiple versions of your paper?

Come and learn best practices on file naming conventions. File naming conventions are a set of rules that help you name your files in a consistent, logical, predictable way, allowing you to distinguish similar files from one another at a glance. With good file naming conventions, you will be able to access files without rethinking the process each time.

Thursday, March 23rd, 1:00pm-2:00pm (East Information Commons, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library)

Sign up for these workshops or request personal appointments online.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

Posted in Uncategorized

Need to find and use health science images? Free workshop Wed. March 22, 11-12am

Heather Healy, Clinical Education Librarian

Using images can add interest to your assignments and presentations, but do you know where to find good images and how to ensure that you use those images ethically?

This workshop will help you understand copyright, creative common licenses, and public domain. You will also learn where to search for stock and health sciences images and how to cite your images appropriately.

Our next session:
Wednesday, March 22nd 11:00am-12:00pm (East Information Commons)

Sign up for these workshops or request personal appointments online.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

Head of Henry Patton by Thomas Addison from book On the constitutional and local effects of disease of the supra-renal capsules

Posted in Uncategorized

Flood Recovery: Linn County Recorder’s Office

As Project Conservator at the UI Libraries, I am tasked with several workflows that are slightly outside of the regular Libraries Lab flow. One being conservation of the Keith Albee Vaudeville Theater Scrapbooks (see more here and here), another being treatment of Linn County Recorder’s Office record books.

Nearly 430 Linn County record books have been surveyed for treatment, and after just over a year, we have worked through approximately 115 of them, getting the books back into use at the County Recorder’s Office. As you will see in the photos below, their office faced a catastrophic disaster in the floods of 2008. Eight years later, recovery work is ongoing.

In the UI Libraries’ conservation lab, we remove books from damaged covers, dry clean textblocks, separate adhered pages, humidify and flatten warped pages, and even wash pages of the record books in preparation for rebinding at a commercial bindery. Each book in this large collection is unique and requires different types of treatment. We evaluate each book prior to starting treatment to determine the needs of each item.

 


June 11, 2008: Vault Room at the Linn County Recorder’s Office 1 hr before closing time (photo: Joan McCalmant)

 


June 14, 2008 taken from same perspective as above, after flooding, prior to clean-up (photo: Joan McCalmant)

 


Instilling some order… (photo: Joan McCalmant)

 


Moldy books, already dry, were hosed down and wiped off (photo: Joan McCalmant)

 


FAST FORWARD 8 Years: Joan McCalmant, Linn County Recorder, stands with record books, many of which have undergone conservation treatment at the University of Iowa Libraries, currently in use at the Linn County Recorder’s Office, on the 2nd Floor.

 


Graduate student, Lindsey Blair, dry cleans, and works on page separation.

 


Before treatment image of a sewn volume. Notice the warped spine and pages and caked mud on pages.

 


A mud-caked page during stages of washing (Do not try this at home!)

 


Loose pages in a humidification chamber where paper fibers soften and relax. Pages are dried flat, under weight, before being rebound. (Do not try this at home!)

 


The warped, mud-caked textblock from above, split into two volumes, rebound at the commercial bindery after cleaning and flattening in the UI Libraries’ conservation lab.

Posted in Uncategorized