We are very busy preparing for the Review

Joseph Culver Letter, May 23, 1865, Page 1

Hd. Qurs., Co. “A” 129th Ills. Vols.
Near Alexandria, Va., May 23d 1865
My Dear Wife

We are very busy preparing for the Review to-morrow, but I haste to write a few lines.1 I have recd. only three letters from you since our arrival here, but presume you thought we were cut off from communications & therefore did not write.

Sister Hannah did not get here on Sunday [the 21st]. It has been raining ever since our arrival until to-day. It is very warm, & we fear to-morrow will be a hard day. We leave here at an early hour as we have 8 or 10 miles to march before we reach Washington. Our day’s march can be little less than 20 miles, & much of the way in line which at best is very Severe.2 If it is warm as today, many a poor fellow will fall by the way.

We are all in good health. All necessary arrangements are being made for our muster out, yet we will hardly be able to leave here for a couple of weeks yet. I will write when we reach camp after the Review. I hope to hear from you more frequently. We are all well. Remember me in love to all.

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

  1. Those that did not draw new clothes repaired and cleaned their old uniforms. Small arms and accoutrements were cleaned and polished, “and preparations made … to appear in a proper condition” for the review. Grunert, History of the 129th Illinois, p. 258.
  2. Orders issued by General Sherman on the 20th called for soldiers of the Armies of the Tennessee and Georgia to be ready to march at daybreak. The men would fall out without knapsacks, with canteens and one day’s rations in haversacks. Understrength regiments would march in close columns of divisions, and the others in close columns of companies; the artillery in battery front, with close intervals. Regimental and headquarters pack mules would be led in close order in rear of the brigade ambulances. With the Army of the Tennessee in the lead, the columns were to cross Long Bridge and take position on Maryland Avenue at the foot of Capitol Hill and east of the canal. At 9 o’clock a signal gun would be fired, and the head of the column would move out, the units marching by close columns of companies, right in front, guide left. Passing around the Capitol to Pennsylvania Avenue, the column would proceed down the avenue, and past the reviewing stand in front of the White House. All colors would be unfurled from the Capitol to a point beyond the President’s reviewing stand. After passing in review, the units would proceed to their new camps, those of the Army of Georgia to be located northeast of Washington and those of the Army of the Tennessee northwest of the city. O. R., Ser. I., Vol. XLVII, pt. III, pp. 526, 539-40.
Posted in Uncategorized

We are very busy preparing for the Review

Joseph Culver Letter, May 23, 1865, Page 1

Hd. Qurs., Co. “A” 129th Ills. Vols.
Near Alexandria, Va., May 23d 1865
My Dear Wife

We are very busy preparing for the Review to-morrow, but I haste to write a few lines.1 I have recd. only three letters from you since our arrival here, but presume you thought we were cut off from communications & therefore did not write.

Sister Hannah did not get here on Sunday [the 21st]. It has been raining ever since our arrival until to-day. It is very warm, & we fear to-morrow will be a hard day. We leave here at an early hour as we have 8 or 10 miles to march before we reach Washington. Our day’s march can be little less than 20 miles, & much of the way in line which at best is very Severe.2 If it is warm as today, many a poor fellow will fall by the way.

We are all in good health. All necessary arrangements are being made for our muster out, yet we will hardly be able to leave here for a couple of weeks yet. I will write when we reach camp after the Review. I hope to hear from you more frequently. We are all well. Remember me in love to all.

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

  1. Those that did not draw new clothes repaired and cleaned their old uniforms. Small arms and accoutrements were cleaned and polished, “and preparations made … to appear in a proper condition” for the review. Grunert, History of the 129th Illinois, p. 258.
  2. Orders issued by General Sherman on the 20th called for soldiers of the Armies of the Tennessee and Georgia to be ready to march at daybreak. The men would fall out without knapsacks, with canteens and one day’s rations in haversacks. Understrength regiments would march in close columns of divisions, and the others in close columns of companies; the artillery in battery front, with close intervals. Regimental and headquarters pack mules would be led in close order in rear of the brigade ambulances. With the Army of the Tennessee in the lead, the columns were to cross Long Bridge and take position on Maryland Avenue at the foot of Capitol Hill and east of the canal. At 9 o’clock a signal gun would be fired, and the head of the column would move out, the units marching by close columns of companies, right in front, guide left. Passing around the Capitol to Pennsylvania Avenue, the column would proceed down the avenue, and past the reviewing stand in front of the White House. All colors would be unfurled from the Capitol to a point beyond the President’s reviewing stand. After passing in review, the units would proceed to their new camps, those of the Army of Georgia to be located northeast of Washington and those of the Army of the Tennessee northwest of the city. O. R., Ser. I., Vol. XLVII, pt. III, pp. 526, 539-40.
Posted in Uncategorized

Honoring Dr. David Sackett, father of evidence-based-medicine

Dr. Last week Dr. David Sackett, considered by many to be the father of evidenced-based medicine, passed away. He founded the first department of clinical epidemiology and biostatistics in the world at McMaster University, Ontario in 1967 and established the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in the UK in 1994.

In honor of Dr. Sackett’s tremendous impact on evidence-based practice, we are sharing a small sample of citations to articles and books from the Hardin Library collection below.

Articles

Sackett DL, Rosenberg WM, Gray JA, Haynes RB, Richardson WS. Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t. BMJ (Clinical research ed). 1996;312(7023):71-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2349778/pdf/bmj00524-0009.pdf

Sackett DL, Cook RJ. Understanding clinical trials. BMJ (Clinical research ed). 1994;309(6957):755-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2541011/pdf/bmj00458-0009.pdf

Jaeschke R, Guyatt GH, Sackett DL. User’s guides to the medical literature: III. How to use an article about a diagnostic test: B. What are the results and will they help me in caring for my patients? J Am Med Assoc. 1994;271(9):703-7. http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.1994.03510330081039

Laupacis A, Sackett DL, Roberts RS. An assessment of clinically useful measures of the consequences of treatment. New England Journal of Medicine. 1988;318(26):1728-33. http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198806303182605

Sackett DL. Bias in analytic research. J Chronic Dis. 1979;32(1-2):51-63. http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0021-9681(79)90012-2

 Guides by Hardin Librarians

Evidence Based Practice

Systematic Reviews

 clinical epi  how to practice and teach EBM

Books

Sackett DL. Evidence-based medicine : how to practice and teach EBM. Edinburgh ; New York :Churchill Livingstone; 2000. Print book, call #: RC48.E85 2000

Sackett DL, Sackett DL. Clinical epidemiology : a basic science for clinical medicine. Boston :: Little, Brown; 1991. Print book, call #: RA652.C45 1991

Additional Information

Obituary from BMJ

Wikepedia on David Sackett

Vox Science and Health

 

 

 

5 million downloads

We are very excited to have had 5 million downloads in Iowa Research Online! We had 4 million downloads in November, so this last million happened in only about 6 months. Some of this growth is attributable to the fantastic content added recently (such as the State Historical Society journal Annals of Iowa, back to 1863).

IRO map showing 5 million downloads

While we don’t know exactly what download made us cross the 5 million mark, these items all received higher use around the time we made it to 5 million.

Kerber Fund Recipient Uncovers Women’s History

Hannah

Say hello to Hannah Dudley-Shotwell, a scholar who is visiting the Archives this week, thanks to assistance from the Linda and Richard Kerber Fund for Research in the Iowa Women’s Archives.  Hannah is one of the first recipients of the grant, which was inaugurated last spring. She’s a doctoral candidate in History at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, and is conducting research on self-help in the women’s health movement from 1970 to the start of the 21st century.

Hannah describes her research as revisiting an area of women’s activism that many assumed ended after Roe v. Wade. She argues that, while the early focus of self-help in the women’s health movement was on gynecology, after Roe v. Wade many self-help activists transformed their work, incorporating fertility consciousness, donor insemination, and holistic medicine.

Hannah’s had a great time here at IWA! Records like those of the Emma Goldman Clinic will provide important primary material for several chapters of her dissertation, and she was delighted to find material on yet another clinic in the Carol Hodne papers. Hannah describes the many newsletters and publications on women’s health that have been collected and even produced by some of the clinics she’s researched here, which played an important role in educating women about their own health.

None of this would have been possible without the help of the Linda and Richard Kerber Fund. It was this fund that first drew Hannah’s attention to our archives; little did she know how much material she would find here! We’ve been enjoying getting to know Hannah this week, and look forward to seeing where her project goes.

Posted in Uncategorized

Yours of May 2d came to hand this afternoon

Joseph Culver Letter, May 21, 1865, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Ills. Vols.
Near Alexandria, Va., May 21st 1865
My Dear Wife

Yours of May 2d came to hand this afternoon. I am happy to hear that your health & Howard’s is as good as it is & hope God may bless you with good health. I intended to write you a long letter to-day, but it rained hard until noon & threatens to rain again. For three days it has been raining almost constantly, & it has become very muddy & unpleasant.1 To-morrow we will move a few miles nearer Washington & get ready for our Review on Wednesday.

Sister Hannah & Bro. Wes & family were to be here to-day, but the rain has prevented them. Sister Hannah expects to return home soon after the Review. Bro. Charlie [Culver] is expected here to-morrow.

We have a miserable camp here with no facilities for fixing up. We are all impatient for the time to arrive when we shall start homeward. We have learned nothing since our arrival here. I will try & go to Washington on Tuesday [the 23d] & get what blanks & papers I need to settle up my accounts. I think it very probable we will be mustered out at Springfield or Pontiac though it may possibly be done here.

Our Review on Wednesday will be very tedious & wearisome, but we hope ‘twil be the last. We recd. notice that all troops whose time expires by Octr. 1st next will be sent off as soon after the Review as possible, though we may be delayed for want of sufficient transportation. I have but little idea of the route we will take, but think it probable we will go on the Baltimore & Ohio rail road.

This has been a dull Sabbath: The rain has kept us confined in our little tents all day; I hope it will clear up soon so we can get around. I have not been in Alexandria yet; we are about 4 or 5 miles distant. I saw the dome of the Capitol at Washington from the summit of a neighboring hill day before yesterday evening.

I saw Allen Fellows to-day, he is quite well, also Crist [Yetter], Nate [Hill], & all the boys. The mail is making up, & I must close. As I cannot tell when we will leave here, I hope to hear from you often. The letter recd. today is the only one recd. since we left Raleigh. Letters should not be more than 5 days coming through. I wrote to you from Richmond & also from Burke’s Station where Bro. Wes is on duty. Remember me kindly to all our friends. Kiss Howard for me. Hoping to see you safe & well, I remain,

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

P.S. Your letter recd. to-day contained 6 postage stamps. Please accept my thanks. I have now a large supply on hand.

J. F. C.

  1. The regimental historian reported that on the 21st, “the rain continued to pour down in torrents. . . . We had the greatest trouble in preparing our meals, got wet to the skin, and had to remain in the tents until more favorable weather commenced.” Grunert, History of the 129th Illinois, pp. 257-59.
Posted in Uncategorized

China Data Online – Trial ends 17 June 2015

China Data Online includes China Statistical Databases, China Census Databases, and China Spatial Data Service (China Geo-Explorer). It provides easy access to the various statistical yearbooks published by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, comprehensive statistics, and Census data of economy and population at national, provincial, city, county, and even township levels.

Please send additional comments to Brett Cloyd.

Posted in Uncategorized

I was most agreeably surprised to meet Bro. Wes. coming after me with a horse

Joseph Culver Letter, May 19, 1865, Page 1

Burke’s Station, Va.
May 19th 1865
My Dear Wife

As I was trudging along yesterday evening longing for camp, I was most agreeably surprised to meet Bro. Wes. [Culver] coming after me with a horse & permission for me to leave the column.1 I mounted & we came to this place, where I found Sister Hannah, Mary, Willie & the baby.2 All very glad to see me. We have but 7 miles more to camp.

The column left at 5 o’clock this morning, & I presume are at the place by this time. I will start in a few minutes. I hope to hear from you this evening or to-morrow. We are all very weary but will be recruited up in a few days.

I wish you could be here at the Review next week.3 I will write as soon as we get into camp. Bro. Wes & family are all well, so are all at Mother’s. It rained very hard last night & is cold this morning. I must close for the present with love to all. May God bless you.

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

  1. Wesley Culver was one of J.F.C.’s younger brothers, and he was currently stationed near Fairfax Station. Wesley had been mustered into service on Nov. 22, 1862, as assistant surgeon of the 56th Pennsylvania. On Feb. 26, 1863, he was medically discharged, because of a “dropsical leg” occasioned by an 18-foot fall from a tree at the family home which fractured several small ankle bones. By Oct. 27, 1864, his injury having healed, Wesley reentered service as assistant surgeon of the 202d Pennsylvania Infantry. March 1865 found him on detached duty, near Burke’s Station, with Companies D and I of his regiment. Compiled Service Records of Union Soldiers, NA.
  2. Wesley was felled by “consumption” in March, and his wife Mary had come down from Carlisle to help nurse him, bringing with her their two sons, five-year-old Willie and Charlie who had been born in December 1864.
  3. It had been announced on May 18 by Army headquarters that there would be “a review with marching salute, of the Army of the Potomac, the Army of the Tennessee, the Army of Georgia, and General Sheridan’s cavalry” on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 23d and 24th. On the 23d would be reviewed the Army of the Potomac and Sheridan’s cavalry and on the following day, General Sherman’s two armies. O. R., Ser. I, Vol. XLVII, pt. Ill, p. 526.
Posted in Uncategorized

Open Book Publishers – Trial ends 22 May 2015

Open Book Publishers books are published in hardback, paperback, pdf and ebook editions, but they also include a free online edition that can be read via their website, downloaded, reused or embedded anywhere. Founded in 2008 by a small group of academics at the University of Cambridge, they have grown into an international network of scholars who believe that it is time for academic publishing to become fairer, faster and more accessible.

Please send additional comments to Carmelita Pickett.