Don’t you think I am improving most marvelously in my habits?

Joseph Culver Letter, February 28, 1865, Page 1Office Chief of Artillery, District of Tennesee,
Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 28th 1865.
My Dear Mollie:

Your good long letter of the 23rd reached me this morning. Just see how prompt I am to reply. Don’t you think I am improving most marvelously in my habits? I’ve begun well today – rose very early (although I did not retire very early last night) and finished the business of the morning before breakfast. Soon after breakfast the mail boy handed me your letter. And I’ve read it over lots of times – expecially that part about the girls.

Of course, I’ll take your advice kindly, and not only that but I prize it very highly. But I have no notion of making overtures for the hand of Jennie Guthrie, & I think she does not understand it otherwise. I do not think I have been the cause, even indirectly, of a rupture between her and Kelly – if any such thing has occurred. Mollie, don’t you know that I can never marry a woman that can’t sing? With my prospective wife, that is an indispensible acquirement. She must not only be able to sing, but she must sing well. I’m not going to look for a wife till I get out of the army. I’ll have plenty of time then to find one before circumstances will permit me to marry. I had a letter from Tom yesterday containing a photograph of himself, with his beard shaved off his face on the sides of his face. He looks well in the new cut. I have heard from Sammy but once since since coming from home. I had no premonition of mother’s death. Anything of the kind was the farthest possible removed from my mind. I had made application for a leave of absence with good prospect of success and was anticipating so much pleasure from a visit with her and the rest of you at home, when the sad news reached me. My leave came the next day, but I did not then care to go home. Mollie, I’ll write more next time. I received and answered yours with the pictures.

Goodbye, with love – much love
Affectionately,
Johnnie

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Database of the Week: IBISWorld

Each week we will highlight one of the many databases we have here at the Pomerantz Business Library.

The database: IBISWorld IBISWorld

Where to find it: You can find it here, and under I in the databases A-Z list.

Use it to find:

  • US Industry Reports – The “NAICS collection analyzes industries at the 5-digit level offering the latest content on 700 industries. Each report consists of 30 to 40 pages of key statistics and analysis on market characteristics, operating conditions, current and forecast performance, major industry participants and more”.
  • US Industry iExpert Summaries – These summaries” condense[] the integral elements from [the] industry reports into bite-sized paragraphs, graphics and tables, highlighting the key issues with a Q&A section
  • US Specialized Industry Reports – Additional industries not covered in standard NAICS industries.
  • Global Industry Reports – currently around 70 of these
  • US Business Environment Profiles – The “Business Environment Profiles provide insight into [ ] key drivers, which include exchange rates, commodity prices, interest rates, weather conditions, consumer attitudes, demographics and many more”.

IBISWorld2

Tips for searching:

  • Browse by clicking on the report type headings – and then by industry sector
  • If you know your industry’s NAICS code search using the first 5 digits.
  • Feel free to do a keyword search for an industry, company or product
  • Use the magnifying glass icon to search within a report

Check out the IBISWorld tutorial below:

Want help using IBISWorld ? Contact Willow or Kim and set up an appointment.

University of Iowa Libraries to host Shakespeare’s First Folio exhibition in 2016

Traveling exhibit to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death

The University of Iowa Libraries has been selected as the host site for the state of Iowa for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, a national traveling exhibition of the Shakespeare First Folio, one of the world’s most treasured books.

The Folger Shakespeare Library, in partnership with Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association, is touring a First Folio of Shakespeare in 2016 to all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

“We are incredibly excited to have the opportunity to showcase one of the most important books ever printed,” says University Librarian John Culshaw. “How appropriate that the First Folio visit the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, the only UNESCO City of Literature in the United States. First Folio! will be the first travelling exhibit hosted in the UI Main Library exhibition space, which is currently undergoing renovation and slated to open later this year. As the only stop on the tour in the state of Iowa, we welcome all Iowans to visit the Libraries and experience this unique piece of history.”

Many of Shakespeare’s plays were not published during his lifetime. The First Folio is the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It was published in 1623, seven years after Shakespeare’s death. Two of Shakespeare’s fellow actors compiled 36 of his plays, hoping to preserve them for future generations. Without it, we would not have 18 of Shakespeare’s plays, including Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, The Tempest, Antony and Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, and As You Like It. All 18 appear for the first time in print in the First Folio.

“The First Folio is the book that gave us Shakespeare. Between its covers we discover his most famous characters—Hamlet, Desdemona, Cordelia, Macbeth, Romeo, Juliet, and hundreds of others—speaking words that continue to move and inspire us,” says Michael Witmore, director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. “Shakespeare tells the human story like no one else. We are delighted that we can share this precious resource with people everywhere.”

When the First Folio arrives in Iowa City, its pages will be opened to the most quoted line from Shakespeare and one of the most quoted lines in the world, “to be or not to be” from Hamlet. Accompanying the book will be a multi-panel exhibition exploring the significance of Shakespeare, then and now, with additional digital content and interactive activities.

“In addition to showcasing the First Folio, the Libraries will be highlighting other examples of English early printed materials in an expansive exhibition,” says Greg Prickman, head of Special Collections. “We are also excited to be working with many campus and community partners to host a range of programs for the public.”

Final touring dates for First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare will be announced in April.

The Folger Shakespeare Library holds 82 copies of the First Folio, by far the largest collection in the world and more than a third of the 233 known copies in the world today. It is believed that 750 copies were originally printed.

The Shakespeare First Folio is one of the most valuable printed books in the world; a First Folio sold for $6.2 million in 2001 at Christie’s and another one for $5.2 million in 2006 in London. It originally sold for one British pound (20 shillings)—about $200 today.

First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, and by the generous support of Google.org and Vinton and Sigrid Cerf. Sponsorship opportunities of this major exhibition and the Folger’s other Wonder of Will programs commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death are available; learn more at www.folger.edu.

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About University of Iowa Libraries

The University of Iowa Libraries provides leadership in the creation, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to advance intellectual discovery and encourage lifelong learning. With print and digital collections that are richly diverse and deeply comprehensive, the Libraries also offers state-of-the-art resources that enhance teaching and learning on campus and beyond. In partnership with the teaching faculty, the Libraries offers a variety of information literacy and course-related instructional programs designed to develop these critical skills in students in all disciplines. The Libraries is the largest library system in Iowa and ranks 14th among materials expenditures among U.S. public research libraries. University Libraries is proud of its role as the foundation on which the University of Iowa’s academic and research programs rest.


About Folger Shakespeare Library
Folger Shakespeare Library is a world-renowned center for scholarship, learning, culture, and the arts. It is home to the world’s largest Shakespeare collection and a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500-1750). The Folger is an internationally recognized research library offering advanced scholarly programs in the humanities; an innovator in the preservation of rare materials; a national leader in how Shakespeare is taught in grades K–12; and an award-winning producer of cultural and arts programs—theatre, music, poetry, exhibits, lectures and family programs. Learn more at www.folger.edu.

About Cincinnati Museum Center
Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) at Union Terminal is a nationally recognized institution and national historic landmark. Dedicated to sparking community dialogue, insight and inspiration, CMC was awarded the 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and received accreditation from the American Alliance of Museums in 2012. CMC is one of only 16 museums in the nation with both of these honors, making it a unique asset and a vital community resource. Union Terminal has been voted the nation’s 45th most important building by the American Institute of Architects. Organizations within CMC include the Cincinnati History Museum, Duke Energy Children’s Museum, Museum of Natural History & Science, Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater and Cincinnati History Library & Archives. Recognized by Forbes Traveler Magazine as the 17th most visited museum in the country, CMC welcomes more than one million visitors annually. For more information, visit www.cincymuseum.org.

About the American Library Association
The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

ALA’s Public Programs Office provides leadership, resources, training and networking opportunities that help thousands of librarians nationwide develop and host cultural programs for adult, young adult and family audiences. The mission of the ALA Public Programs Office is to promote cultural programming as an essential part of library service in all types of libraries. Projects include book and film discussion series, literary and cultural programs featuring authors and artists, professional development opportunities and traveling exhibitions. School, public, academic and special libraries nationwide benefit from the office’s programming initiatives. Additional information can be found at www.ala.org/programming.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

Standards Xpress Class Today, Feb. 26!!

Standards: Guides and Regulations for Building and Evaluating Resources

This class is an introduction to standards and specifications. Learn how to access a wide variety of standards including ASTM, ISO, ADA, NFPA (Fluid), and the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Featuring a new database, TechStreet, to gain electronic access to these standards and more.

Today, 2:30 p.m., 2001C Seamans Center Library Computer Classroom, 30 minute class.

Taught by Kari Kozak, Head, Lichtenberger Engineering Library.

LIB_Feb_26_Standards

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Make your own book, and eat them, too.… Edible Book Festival, April 1

The University of Iowa Libraries invites faculty, staff, students, and the Iowa City community to celebrate the annual International Edible Book Festival April 1 by crafting a delicious book to share and, of course, eat.

To participate, follow two simple rules: entries must be edible, and they must have something to do with books as shapes and/or content. Edible books will be displayed on April 1 in the Main Library Learning Commons, Group Study Rooms 1103 and 1105 in the South Lobby from 3:00-3:45 p.m., followed by a book tasting.

Prizes will be awarded in multiple categories including Best Book Structure, Best Literary Allusion, Judge’s Favorite, Audience Favorite, and Best Tasting. Judges will include Executive Chef of the Iowa Memorial Union Barry Greenberg, and University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections Librarian Colleen Theisen.

Photos and updates will be added to the Twitter hashtag #ediblebookiowa.

The International Edible Book Festival is an annual event held on April 1 around the world. The event unites bibliophiles, book artists, and food lovers to celebrate the ingestion of culture and its fulfilling nourishment. Participants create edible books that are exhibited, photographed, and then consumed. Information and inspiration can be found at www.Books2Eat.com.

For more information or to submit an entry, please contact Brett Cloyd via email at brett-cloyd@uiowa.edu or by telephone at (319) 335-5743, and bring your entry to Room 1103 between 2:00-2:45 p.m. on April 1.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Brett Cloyd in advance.

Happy Pi Day (Eve) 3.13, 10:30!

IMG_20150223_142857590We gather and celebrate Pi Day (Eve) on Friday, March 13 at 10:30 AM-12:30 PM in front of the Lichtenberger Engineering Library in the Student Commons. There will be free apple pie bites, lemonade, and coffee as well as trivia competitions!

Pi, Greek letter, is defined as a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter – which is approximately 3.141592653. The first Pi Day was “invented” in 1988 by Larry Shaw, who worked in the electronics group at San Francisco Exploratorium. In 2009, the House of Representatives designated March 14 as National Pi Day. This year, we are excited to observe the special Pi Day on 3/14/15 at 9:26:53 AM and PM, with the sequential time representing the first ten digits of pi!

To celebrate this special Pi Day, check out the Pi Day exhibit and join us on March 13!

References

How American celebrate Pi Day. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/14/tech/innovation/pi-day-math-celebrations/

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Save time and learn how to set up alerts for new articles and journal table of contents with our free workshop Wed. Feb 25, 10-11am

Want to know as soon as an exciting new article is published? Tired of skimming the websites or paper copies of multiple journals to see what is in the new issue?

This hands-on session will show you how to create a single destination for information from your favorite journals, databases, websites and blogs using RSS feeds and auto-alerts.

Our workshop is Wednesday, February 25, from 10am-11am.  Register online  or request a personal session.

 

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North China Herald-Trial ends March 24th

The North China Herald is the prime printed source for the history of the foreign presence in China from around 1850 to 1940s. No other newspaper existed over such an extended period, and covers it in such incredible depth and variety. The fully text-searchable North China Herald Online will be one of the primary resources on a period which continues to shape much of China’s world and worldview.

Please send comments to min-tian@uiowa.edu

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Lecture: From the Iowa Cow Wars of the Depression Era to Raw Milk Battles at MERF February 26

Russell Currier

Russell Currier

Mary Gilchrist

Mary Gilchrist

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invites you to hear Mary Gilchrist, retired Director and Professor of the University of Iowa Hygienic Lab and Russell Currier, Past President, American Veterinary Medical History Society.

Gilchrist and Currier will give a talk titled From the Iowa Cow Wars of the Depression to the Raw Milk Battles of the 21st Century–Protecting Iowan’s Health One Tussle at a Time” on Thursday, February 26, 2015 from 5:30pm-6:30pm in the Medical Education Research Facility (map)  room 2117.

Pasteur in his lab

Pasteur in his lab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on the History of Medicine Society, or to donate, please see:  http://hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/histmed/index.html .