Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group 2016

As a new librarian, I appreciate the privilege that my residency at the University of Iowa’s Preservation and Conservation department affords me; aside from the professional expectations of any other position, I’m encouraged to explore gaps in my LIS education and professional interests. However, there is never enough time to learn everything! Professional conferences are invaluable, particularly in this stage of my career, for continuing education and exposure to adjacent areas of focus in librarianship. Imagine my excitement when I learned that that 2016’s PASIG fall meeting would be in NYC. Yes, I WAS overjoyed. PASIG’s conference was envisioned as both a sharing and learning opportunity for preservation and archiving professionals at all levels, as well as those outside of the LIS profession, such as developers.

Founded in 2007, the practice-centered meeting focuses on questions and considerations as well as solutions, but keeps it light on theory. Too often, professional meetings and conferences’ pre-assumption of broad audience understanding and heavy use of LIS-centered jargon can leave one feeling intimidated and behind the pack. Day one at PASIG directly addressed the issue and leveled the plane in preparation for the deep dives to follow – all without an additional cost and additional travel accommodations of a “pre-conference.”  About half of the estimated 300 participants attended boot camp the first day, which serves as both an introduction, overview, and a refresher.

Sessions following the boot camp covered topics along the spectrum of the “3rd age of digital preservation,” as well as preservation and archiving in relation to reference rot, new media, social justice, and the environmental impacts of digital preservation and professional responsibilities, among others. Though vendors were well-represented at the conference, the mix of professionals and scholars were the highlight of the conference. Presenters and lightning round speakers from libraries, archives, museums, universities, and cross-institutional partnerships shared case studies, challenges, successes, and pitfalls to avoid.

As always, librarians and archivists put together a lovely fete for attendants. Our hosts at MoMa arranged an after-hours reception and tours of two works that were recently treated by their Media Conservation department. Media Conservator Kate Lewis gave a tour of Teiji Furuhashi’s 1994 immersive work, Lovers. After we experienced the piece, conserved to maintain the integrity of Furuhashi vision as well as its condition in 1994, we were allowed a peek at the required wiring and networked coordinating components of sound and motion. After discussing the guaranteed obsolesce of hardware currently in use and the knowledge management in place in anticipation of treatment needed in 20 years, we moved on to Nan Goldin’s Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1979-2004). Peter Oleksik spoke of the use and conservation challenges of the work before we viewed MoMa’s iteration of the installation.

By conference close, I felt that I had valuable information and references to bring back to Iowa. By far, PASIG 2016 was the most useful professional conference I’ve attended thus far. Next year’s PASIG meeting will be in Oxford.

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Finals Week at the Sciences Library

You’re getting ready for Finals Week, and so is the Sciences Library! The following special activities will be available all week (Mon., Dec. 12 – Fri., Dec. 16)!:

  1. Missing Mascot Mug Giveaway – Our mascot, Chauncey, is missing! Find him in the Library, bring him to the service desk, and win a free Sciences Library travel mug (while supplies last)!Travel mugChauncey
  2. Legos, K’Nex, and coloring – Take a study break and relax with building games and coloring pages/crayons!toys and games
  3. Free coffee, tea, and treats – We always put out free coffee and tea to help fuel your studies, but Finals Week is special, so we have treats too! Pam is making her famous mini brownies!coffee and treats

We’ll be open from 8:30 a.m. – 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Friday. Join us!

 

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Special Collections News & Updates 12/8/2016

20161207_110017News of Interest: Something Really Cool that You’ve Never Heard Of  http://blog.admissions.uiowa.edu/mina/2016/12/something-really-cool-that-youve-never-heard-of/ Before & After Treatment: Keith’s New Theatre clipping book  http://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/preservation/2016/12/01/before-after-treatment-keiths-new-theatre-clipping-book/ Events: Arthur Bonfield, “The Why, How, What, and […]
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The birth of mankinde , othwise named the woman’s booke | December 2016 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

from The birth of mankinde, 1604

EUCHARIUS RÖSSLIN (d. 1526). The birth of mankinde, otherwise named the woman’s booke. Set foorth in English by Thomas Raynalde. London: Thomas Adams, [1604].

Based on the Latin version, De partu hominis was translated and published by Richard Jonas (fl. 1540).  The next English edition to appear was published by Thomas Raynalde. Raynalde borrowed freely from other authors and included several anatomical plates and descriptive text from Vesalius’ Fabrica. There were over ten subsequent editions of Raynalde’s translation.

English midwives and physicians were largely dependent on this book for guidance in the practice of obstetrics until the Eighteenth Century.  In addition to obstetrics, the book covers infant care, nursing, and the diseases of infancy. Illustrations of the birth chair, the lying-in chamber, and various positions of the fetus in utero are seen for the first time and are the earliest obstetrical illustrations printed from wood blocks.  This book was the first printed English book on the subject of midwifery.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

from The birth of mankinde, 1604

from The birth of mankinde, 1604

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PubMed Food Problem: Cranberry & Cranberries – 2016 Update

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Because most plant-based foods are under “plants” instead of “food” in PubMed, articles on cranberries may not be retrieved in a search for Food.

By Eric Rumsey, Janna Lawrence and Xiaomei Gu

Part of the problem in searching for food in PubMed is that it’s often the case that there’s a fuzzy border between between food and medicine.   A food that is enjoyed for its taste and general nutritional benefits may have properties that make it therapeutic for specific health conditions. A good example of this is cranberries, and cranberry juice, which may have benefits for prevention of urinary tract infections.

As with most plant-based foods, in MeSH indexing, cranberry is in the Plants explosion, and it’s not in the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion. Fortunately, most articles on cranberries and cranberry juice are assigned some Diet, Food, and Nutrition indexing terms so that they are retrieved in searches for the explosion. For instance, articles on cranberry juice are often under Beverages, and some articles on cranberries are under Fruit or Dietary supplements. However, there is still a significant number of relevant articles on the subject that are missed.

To show examples of cranberry-related articles that are not retrieved by the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion, we searched for cranberry or cranberries in the article title, limited to human, and retrieved 391 articles. We then combined this with the Diet, Food, and Nutrition explosion. This retrieved 269 articles — 69% of the cranberry/cranberries articles, which is a fairly good retrieval. But still, it’s certainly notable that there are 122 articles that are not retrieved, many of which appear to be very much on target, that don’t contain any Diet, Food, and Nutrition MeSH terms. Here are some examples:

As we mentioned above, plant-based foods are tricky to search in PubMed because the name of the food plant is usually only in Plants, and not in any FDN explosion. The six articles above are all indexed under Vaccinium macrocarpon, the taxonomic name of cranberry, which is in the Plants explosion. So if you were searching for articles on urinary tract infections and plant-based foods, a strategy that would retrieve these articles would be to combine Urinary Tract Infections AND Plants.

The image at the top of the article is original.

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Congratulations to our December 2016 Graduate | Seunggun Lee

Seunggun Lee

Seunggun Lee

Seunggun Lee has worked at the Hardin Library for 2 years and will be graduating this month with a B.S., Psychology with a Minor in Physical Activity and Nutrition Science.

What will you be doing after graduation?
I’ve got a job at Four Oaks in Cedar Rapids. I will be working there as a Youth Counselor from next year. I will help children who are diagnosed with mental issues by being a role in the day-to-day care of the children including the use of Trauma Informed Care. I am ultimately helping them heal their deeper trauma and grow successfully into adulthood.

Also, I will be working at the Psychology Research lab at the University of Iowa to gain more experience about collecting data and statistically analyzing it in the lab, which would help me choose which graduate program i would pursue in the future. (I am still deciding which lab I would like to work next year).
I am planning to go to graduate school in 2018 as well.

My favorite part about working at the Hardin Library
My favorite part about working at Hardin library is to offer service by greeting patrons at the front desk in the morning and help them find resources for them. Also, I have met a lot of good people who are emotionally helping me go through a harsh college life.

 

 

 

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Before & After Treatment: Keith’s New Theatre clipping book

Before treatment: Crumbling edges, misshapen spine, detached pages, overfilled pages, board detachment front and back.

Misshapen text block Overfilled scrapbook scrapbook049_04 Board detachment

After treatment: Foldered and housed detached pages in a 4-flap wrapper, sewed new endsheets front and back, lined spine and created new flange with extended liner and new endsheet, reattached text-block to case using new flange, mended edges and substrate tears with Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste, humidified and flattened creased clippings.

new endsheets humidified and flattened creased clippings Foldered and housed detached pages in a 4-flap wrapper

At a future date, this clipping book will be photographed and uploaded to the Keith/Albee Digital Collection. This project has been funded in major part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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PubMed Food Problem: Cruciferous Vegetables

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To do a PubMed search for cruciferous vegetables that includes such species as Radish, Arugula and Wasabi, each species must be done separately.

By Eric Rumsey, Janna Lawrence and Xiaomei Gu

In order to do successful searches for cruciferous vegetables in PubMed, it helps to know exactly what “cruciferous” means, which makes it easier to understand what vegetables are considered “cruciferous” and the botanical relationships among them. We have discussed these topics in a companion article.

In general, cruciferous vegetables are considered to be any plants in the family Brassicaceae that are edible. Most of these, especially the more popular ones (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts) are in the genus Brassica. A few others are in other genera in the family, the most notable being Radish (Raphanus), Daikon (Raphanus), Arugula (Eruca), Horseradish (Armoracia), White mustard (Sinapis), Garden cress (Lepidium) and Wasabi (Wasabia). With most edible members of the family Brassicaceae being in the genus Brassica, then, searching for that genus works well for most cruciferous vegetables. But without including the MeSH terms for all of the other edible genera in the family, there is no easy way to do a comprehensive search for them as a group.

With edible species in several genera in the Brassicaceae family, it might seem like a way to include all of them would be to search for the family name, since it’s an explosion that contains all of the genera in the family. We have seen this done by MeSH indexers in some cases, but it has problems. For one thing, the family is very large, containing 372 genera, so searching for the family name can retrieve many inappropriate citations. This is especially a problem because one of the genera in the family is Arabidopsis, a very commonly used research subject in plant genetics, having nothing at all to do with nutrition. Arabidopsis is something like the Drosophila of the plant world. So of course searching for the exploded MeSH term Brassicaceae gets a flood of articles on Arabidopsis; approximately 80% of all articles retrieved from this search are indexed to the narrower term Arabidopsis.

We found another problem in how cruciferous vegetables are treated in PubMed indexing when we looked at sample of 30 articles with “cruciferous” in the title.  Twenty-eight of the 30 articles actually had the phrase “cruciferous vegetables” in the title, but  in about ⅓ of the 30 articles, there was no indexing term at all correlated with the word “cruciferous,” and the indexing term used was just “vegetables,” ignoring the word “cruciferous.” Another problem we found in this sample is that, of the articles that had an indexing term correlated with “cruciferous,” the term that was usually used was the family name, Brassicaceae, which retrieves many non-food-related citations, as discussed above.

Suggestions for improving indexing of cruciferous foods

Because there is currently no way to search for cruciferous foods as a group, we would suggest that NLM should add a new MeSH term <cruciferous foods>. This would not only put all of these foods under one term, it would also provide a term to use for articles that use the term itself in the title or abstract.

Image at top of article is from Wikipedia.

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Special Collections News & Updates 11/30/2016

collections  News of Interest: UI earns No. 1 ranking in university website accessibility: https://now.uiowa.edu/2016/11/ui-tops-in-university-website-accessibility A Snapshot of Cook’s Point (with a shout out to Migration is Beautiful): http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/13/a-snapshot-of-cooks-point/ Staff Publications: Instruction Librarian […]