New Liaison Librarians Join Hardin Staff

Heather Healy and Matt Regan
Heather Healy and Matt Regan

Heather Healy and Matt Regan

Hardin Library recently welcomed two new Clinical Education Librarians, Heather Healy and Matt Regan.

Heather is the primary liaison to Carver College of Medicine and to a number of UIHC departments, including Internal Medicine. Before arriving at Hardin on July 1, Heather was a health sciences librarian at KU Medical Center in Kansas City, and previously worked at Kansas State University libraries. Before receiving her Master of Library Science degree from Emporia State University, Heather worked as an editor for Human Kinetics, a health sciences publisher. You can contact Heather at heather-healy@uiowa.edu.

Matt Regan joined the Hardin staff on July 18 and will be the liaison to Family Medicine and several other departments. He will also support Hardin’s website and other technologies. An Iowa native, Matt received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Iowa. After receiving his Master of Library and Information Science Degree from Dominican University, he was a reference and instruction librarian at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas, where he served as liaison to Nursing and other health sciences programs. You can contact Matt at matthew-regan@uiowa.edu.

Welcome to Hardin, Heather and Matt!

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Pictures of Nursing: Zwerdling Postcard Collection | Exhibit open @Hardin Library

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Rural visiting nurse Elizabeth McPhee

Rural visiting nurse Elizabeth McPhee

Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection is now on exhibit at Hardin Library.  The exhibit explores a 2,588 postcard archive spanning over 100 years.  Images of nursing and the nursing profession around the world have been frequent subjects of postcards.

Postcards are influenced by popular ideas and social and culture life, as well as fashion. These images of nurses and nursing are informed by cultural values; ideas about women, men, and work; and attitudes toward class, race, and national differences. By documenting the relationship of nursing to significant forces in 20th-century life, such as war and disease, these postcards reveal how nursing was seen during those times.

500 additional postcards may be viewed online.nurses60s

This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

 

Data Research Services: UM Experience | Webinar, Thursday July 21, 2-3pm

Jake-Carlson

The Greater Midwest Region (GMR) @Hardin Library and South Central Region (SCR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine present a jointly sponsored webinar :

Data Research Services: University of Michigan Experience

Thursday, July 21, 2-3pm CDT

This webinar session is focused on interviewing Jake Carlson and Marisa Conte, both who are involved in research data services at the University of Michigan. Join us to learn how data services support interactions between scientists and librarians, and how these interactions create new opportunities for health sciences libraries.

Topics covered in this webinar include:

  • needs assessments to inform a research data service
  • the importance of teaching data literacy
  • data management requirement from funding agencies
  • value of health science libraries as partners in data management

Jake Carlson

Marisa Conte

Jake Carlson is the Research Data Services Manager for the UM Library. He oversees the development and implementation of a data services program designed to apply the practices, principles and perspectives of library science to address researchers’ needs in managing, organizing, sharing and preserving their research data. More information about Jake and the work that he has done is available on his website.

As the Translational Research and Data Informationist, Marisa Conte [Profile] provides research support to clinical and basic scientists with an emphasis on translational research. Her areas of expertise include data management, biomedical informatics, collaborative technologies, and expert literature searching. 

To join the meeting:

  1. Go to: https://webmeeting.nih.gov/jointwebinar/
  2. At the log in screen, choose “Enter as a Guest” and type in your name.
  3. Once the room is open, the system will provide you with a phone number to dial-in and a participant code to connect to the audio.
  4. Please use *6 to mute or unmute your phone.

Problems? Contact the SCR Regional Medical Library (RML) office at 817-735-2223.

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Bernardino Genga |July 2016 Notes from The John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

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BERNARDINO GENGA (1620-1690). Anatomia per uso et intelligenza del disegno; ricercata non solo su gl’ossi, e muscoli del corpo humano… Rome: Domenico de Rossi, 1691.

An authoritative anatomist and surgeon in Rome, Genga stressed the importance of solid anatomical knowledge for the surgeon. Genga wrote the first book devoted entirely to surgical anatomy which remained a widely used manual for fifty years.

Genga was one of the first Italians to accept Harvey’s theory on the circulation of the blood, but Genga also maintained that the discovery was made by Colombo and Cesalpino before Harvey. The parts played by those two Italian investigators and anatomists in the unfolding of the facts of circulatory physiology have been a point of study and argument among medical historians.

This large atlas contains 40 magnificent full-page engraved plates depicting the human figure in various poses, with and without dissection. Some of the full-figure plates are engraved renditions of celebrated antique statues in Rome. The plates, probably engraved by François Andriot, were intended primarily for the use of painters and sculptors, and they are still considered to be one of the best collections for the use of student artists. The text is by Giovanni Maria Lancisi.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.  Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

 

4th of July Holiday hours

Library

The library will be closed on Monday, July 4 for the national holiday.

The library will be open reduced hours on Sunday, July 3:
12pm-4pm

The 24-hour study is available with an access card.

Library

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New library catalog coming | InfoHawk catalog retired

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After 16 years, the UI Libraries is moving to a new library catalog and system. Changes have begun and will continue through July.

InfoHawk, the traditional online catalog, has been taken out of service. Links to InfoHawk will now take you to Smart Search  which has been an alternative way to search for UI Libraries’ resources for some time.

The next change will come in a few weeks, when Smart Search will be replaced by InfoHawk+.

InfoHawk+, which resembles Smart Search, will allow you to search for electronic and print journals and books, as well as other resources from the UI Libraries collections.

The staff side of the library system is also changing, so some services like receiving books from other UI Libraries may be slightly delayed until later in July.

If you need any help at all, please contact us.

 

 

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Molly Olmstead | Administrative Services Coordinator | National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Greater Midwest Region

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Meet Molly Olmstead, Administrative Coordinator for the GMR office @Hardin Library.  Molly will begin working July 1, 2016.

Olmstead Molly-20160624-NF-03In her new role with the GMR office, Molly will be processing travel transactions, registering for and maintaining a schedule of exhibiting, serving as a first point of contact for the GMR office phone number and email address, processing subawards and updating awardees on funding progress, handling NLM brochure mailings to members, assisting with communications, and assisting with maintaining entries in the NN/LM exhibit database.

Molly has been employed as the Administration & Human Resources Secretary for the University Libraries’ since August 2015. During her time in that role, Molly processed human resources transactions, time records, maintained employee information, tracked expenses, and coordinated the student employment program.

Prior to this, Molly was employed as a Project Coordinator at Pearson, supporting ongoing operational assessment.

Molly holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and Journalism and is a passionate fan of Faulkner.

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Interested in writing a systematic review? | Free workshops this summer to get started

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Are you interested in conducting a systematic review?  We have two workshops to help you get started.

Step one-
Systematic Reviews: Nuts and Bolts of a Systematic Review

This class provides a framework for developing a literature search for a systematic review, including:

    •  standards and criteria to consider
    • establishing a plan
    • registering a protocol,
    • developing a research question,
    • determining where to search
    • identifying search terms
    • reporting search strategies, and managing references.

 Wednesday, June 29, 1-2pm, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library

Step two-

Systematic Reviews: Literature Searching for the Health Sciences

This class focuses on tips and techniques for carrying out a successful literature search in support of a health sciences systematic review. Topics include

    •  techniques for developing search strategies
    • deciding which databases to search
    • how to seek out grey literature for a given topic
    • selecting journals for hand searching, documenting search strategies
    • saving and organizing references.

 Wednesday, July 6, 1-2pm, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library

Sign up for these workshops or request personal appointments online or by calling 319-335-9151.

By Centre for Health Communication and Participation La Trobe University, Australasian Cochrane Centre [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Centre for Health Communication and Participation La Trobe University, Australasian Cochrane Centre [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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Citation management making you crazy? | Learn to manage with EndNote Deskop | Workshop 6/28 10am @HLHS

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EndNote is a reference management tool that helps you to easily gather together your references in one place, organize them, and then insert them into papers and format them in a style of your choosing. This session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format your citations. The class will be hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

EndNote Desktop is available at no cost to graduate students, faculty and staff.  endnote graphic

Our sessions this summer:
Tuesday, June 28, 10:00 – 11:00 am (Information Commons East, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences)
Thursday, August 11, 10:00 – 11:00 am

Sign up online or by calling 319-335-9151.

NIH new policy | Single IRB for multi-site studies

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Accelerating clinical research studies benefits researchers, research participants, and all who stand to gain from research results. Today, the time it takes to go from a sound research idea to the launch of a new, multi-site clinical research study is too long. A major contributor to the delay is that too many institutional review boards (IRBs) are reviewing the protocol and consent documents for the same study, often with no added benefit in terms of the protections for research participants. To address this bottleneck, NIH has issued a new policy to streamline the review process for NIH-funded, multi-site clinical research studies in the United States. The NIH Policy on the Use of a Single Institutional Review Board (IRB) for Multi-Site Research sets the expectation that multi-site studies conducting the same protocol use a single IRB to carry out the ethical review of the proposed research. 

This policy applies to all competing grant applications (new, renewal, revision, or resubmission) with receipt dates on or after May 25, 2017. Ongoing, non-competing awards will not be expected to comply with this policy until the grantee submits a competing renewal application. For contracts, the policy applies to all solicitations issued on or after May 25, 2017. For the intramural program, the policy applies to intramural multi-site studies submitted for initial review after May 25, 2017.

image courtesy of skeeze @pixabay.com

image courtesy of skeeze @pixabay.com

IRBs play a critical role in reviewing and approving studies involving human research participants. IRBs evaluate the potential benefits of research and risks to participants. In the past, most clinical research studies were carried out at single institutions. Now studies are increasingly conducted at multiple sites to help increase the number and diversity of the participants, improve operational efficiencies, and accelerate the generation of research results. However, for the majority of multi-site studies, the IRB at each participating site continues to conduct an independent review. This review adds time, but generally does not meaningfully enhance protections for the participants.  This new NIH policy seeks to end duplicative reviews that slow down the start of the research.

NIH will support applicant and awardee institutions as they implement the new policy with guidance and resources, such as a model authorization agreement that lays out the roles and responsibilities of each signatory, and a model communication plan that identifies which documents are to be completed, and when.

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.
Director, National Institutes of Health

Resources:

NCATS SMART IRB Reliance Platform

Scenarios for indirect and direct costs

Frequently asked questions

Federal Register notice on the final sIRB policy

NIH guide notice on the final sIRB policy

Final NIH Policy on single IRB for multi-site research

Public comments

Email questions to: SingleIRBPolicy@mail.nih.gov