Public access to NASA-funded research

NASA

NASA made an exciting announcement this week. It’s launching a new research portal to provide free public access to the data and publications resulting from NASA-funded research. The portal points to two new services.

The first, called “NASA’s Data Portal” is a catalog of publicly available datasets, APIs, and visualizations. You can use it to explore by category, or search to find a specific dataset.

The second service, called “PubSpace“, will provide free public access to peer-reviewed journal articles and other publications resulting from NASA-funded research. It is an extension of PubMed Central (PMC), which is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and operated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). PubSpace will be fully functional in Fall 2016.

If you have question or would like to learn more about accessing federally-funded research data or publications, please contact the Sciences Library.

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Coming soon: ChemRxiv

The American Chemical Society has announced it plans to launch a preprint server for chemistry, called ChemRxiv. The launch date for the service has yet to be released.

From American Chemical Society News Releases, August 10, 2016:

“The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced its intention to form ChemRxiv, a chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, proposed as a collaborative undertaking that will facilitate the open dissemination of important scientific findings. The Society is presently in the process of inviting interested stakeholders to participate in helping to shape the service ahead of its anticipated launch.”

“”ChemRxiv is expected to follow the established models of arXiv in physics and bioRxiv in the life sciences by enabling researchers working across diverse areas of inquiry to share early results and data with their scientist-colleagues ahead of formal peer review and publication,” says Kevin Davies, Ph.D., who, as Vice President within the ACS Publications Division, will be spearheading the effort as part of a joint undertaking with the Society’s Chemical Abstracts Service.”

And more information from Nature: Chemists to get their own preprint server

This is an exciting announcement with the potential to change scholarly publishing in the chemistry community. The Sciences Library will provide more information about this new resource as it becomes available. Stay tuned!

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Lego Exhibit

It’s the summer of super heroes at the Sciences Library! Come check out our Lego exhibit, featuring Marvel Superheroes, DC Comics Superheroes, and Star Wars sets. Many thanks to the Scheib family for sharing their collection with us.

First floor display case with superhero Legos

third floor display case with Star Wars Legos

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Research Data Seminar

Open Data From NOAA and Its GranteesHead shot 2015-12-16_crop

Thursday, April 21st, 2016
10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Iowa Memorial Union, Illinois Room (348)
Presented by Jeff de La Beaujardière
Sponsored by University of Iowa Libraries

The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) generates many terabytes of data every day. Data comes from hundreds of sensors on satellites, radar, aircraft, ships, buoys, and from numerical models.

With rare exceptions, all of this data should be made publicly accessible in a timely and usable fashion. NOAA has long been both an advocate and a practitioner of Open Data. Recent White House mandates are expanding public access to the results of federally funded research. In addition, NOAA has initiated research and development agreements with several cloud computing providers to explore new methods for data access and use.

Jeff will address these NOAA policies and activities during his presentation.

Jeff de La Beaujardière has been the NOAA Data Management Architect since May 2011 and Chair of the Environmental Data Management Committee since 2012. He also serves on inter-agency and international groups aimed at enhancing data sharing and interoperability, including the international Group on Earth Observations Data Management Principles Task Force, the US Group on Earth Observations Data Management Working Group, and the Open Geospatial Consortium. In these roles he works toward the vision that NOAA’s rich and unique data holdings shall be discoverable, accessible, well-documented, compatible, and preserved for future use.

Previously, Jeff was Senior Systems Architect for the US Integrated Ocean Observing System Program Office at NOAA, where he guided the implementation of interoperability standards by IOOS partners for data access and discovery. Prior to joining NOAA, Jeff spent 13 years at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in such roles as Geospatial One-Stop Portal Manager; web services developer for the Modeling, Analysis and Prediction 2005 project, the GLOBE Program, and the Public Use of Remote Sensing Data Program; and NASA’s representative to OGC and to the Unidata Policy Committee. He participated in the first OGC Web Mapping Testbed in 1998, implemented the first Web Map Server at NASA, and was Editor of the WMS specification for OGC and the International Organization for Standardization.Jeff de La Beaujardière has been the NOAA Data Management Architect since May 2011 and Chair of the Environmental Data Management Committee since 2012. He also serves on inter-agency and international groups aimed at enhancing data sharing and interoperability, including the international Group on Earth Observations Data Management Principles Task Force, the US Group on Earth Observations Data Management Working Group, and the Open Geospatial Consortium. In these roles he works toward the vision that NOAA’s rich and unique data holdings shall be discoverable, accessible, well-documented, compatible, and preserved for future use.

Dr. de La Beaujardière holds a BA in Physics (1985) from the University of California at Berkeley and a PhD in Astrophysics (1990) from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

This presentation is sponsored by the University of Iowa Libraries. The Libraries’ Research Data Services, in collaboration with other campus offices, including the Division Sponsored Programs, Information Technology Services and Iowa Informatics Initiative, support the data management and publishing needs of researchers.

Please RSVP at https://goo.gl/JLYEb4

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. if you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Sara Sheib in advance at 319-335-3024.

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Sciences Library Spring 2016 Workshops

Join us at the Sciences Library for our Spring 2016 workshops!

  • EndNote
    Monday, March 7, 1:00 PM
    102 Sciences Library
    Are you starting a new research paper or project and looking for a way to manage your references? Then join us for this useful and informative workshop about EndNote, a citation management tool available for free to UI students, faculty, and staff. In this workshop you will learn to use EndNote to import references from popular databases, organize and share your references, use tools to automatically format in-text citations and bibliographies, and use Microsoft Word add-ons to include pre-formatted citations in your paper.
  • Data Management for Researchers
    Monday, March 21, 1:00 PM
    102 Sciences Library
    Are you confused about funding agencies’ new data management and sharing policies? Or do you need some help managing your research data? You’re not alone and we can help! The purpose of this workshop is to explain research data management and its importance, help identify some common data management issues, and learn about best practices and resources that are available.
  • EndNote
    Monday, March 28, 1:00 PM
    102 Sciences Library
    Are you starting a new research paper or project and looking for a way to manage your references? Then join us for this useful and informative workshop about EndNote, a citation management tool available for free to UI students, faculty, and staff. In this workshop you will learn to use EndNote to import references from popular databases, organize and share your references, use tools to automatically format in-text citations and bibliographies, and use Microsoft Word add-ons to include pre-formatted citations in your paper.
  • Writing Data Management Plans
    Monday, April 4, 1:00 PM
    102 Sciences Library
    Many funding agencies now require a data management plan as part of the proposal. Even when it’s not required, a data management plan can be a useful tool for any research project. In this workshop, you will learn how to write a data management plan in compliance with funding agency requirements and about the tools and resources available to help you along the way.
  • Mendeley
    Monday, April 11, 1:00 PM
    102 Sciences Library
    Mendeley Reference Manager is a popular tool used to save, organize, and cite references from journals, books, and other sources. In this workshop, you will learn how to use Mendeley for your research and writing.

These workshops are open to all UI students, faculty, and staff. There is no need to register. If you have any questions, or if you’d like to request a session for your class or group, please contact Sara Scheib.

Exhibit: 350th Anniversary of Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation

Newton ExhibitThe new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Isaac Newton and the 350th anniversary of his Universal Law of Gravitation, presented for the first time in 1666.

We’ve all heard the story about Newton and the apple, but how did Newton really come to understand gravity? Our exhibit describes Newton’s life and work, with an emphasis on the Universal Law of Gravitation and its evolution over time. Many thanks to the Department of Physics & Astronomy for loaning us several items for the exhibit, including a Newtonian telescope and a prism like the one used in Newton’s famous light refraction experiments.

To learn more about Newton and his Universal Law of Gravitation, ask a librarian or check out these excellent resources:

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Exhibit: Einstein and the General Theory of Relativity

Pic for blogOur new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Albert Einstein and the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity, presented for the first time in 1915.

The exhibit explains the general theory of relativity and it’s significance to modern physics. It also provides some interesting background information about his life and family.

To learn more about the general theory of relativity, ask a librarian or check out these cool websites:

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Holiday hours at the Sciences Library

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The Sciences Library will deviate from its normal schedule during the holiday season:

Thanksgiving Recess:

  • Sat., Nov. 21 – Sun., Nov. 22: CLOSED
  • Mon., Nov. 23 – Wed., Nov. 25: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thu., Nov. 26 – Sun., Nov. 29: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Mon., Nov. 30th.

Winter Break:

  • Sat., Dec. 19 – Sun., Dec. 27: CLOSED
  • Mon., Dec. 28 – Thu., Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri., Jan. 1 – Sun., Jan. 3: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 4 – Fri., Jan. 8: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 9 – Sun., Jan. 10: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 11 – Fri., Jan. 15: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 16 – Mon., Jan. 18: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Tues. Jan. 19th.

View all our hours and upcoming events on our calendar. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.

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Exhibit: The Science of Frankenstein

body snatching

We’ve installed a new exhibit at the Sciences Library, just in time for Halloween!

The Science of Frankenstein explores the scientific practices that inspired Mary Shelley’s famous novel, Frankenstein.

body snatchingVictor Frankenstein collected body parts for his monster through body snatching, a common, though gruesome, practice of the time. Historically, a shortage of cadavers available for medical students created an industry of enterprising thieves who would prowl graveyards for recently buried corpses to sell for medical research. The corpses allowed medical students to learn more about the internal organs of the body and how they work as well as giving doctors the opportunity to improve amputation techniques.

Dr. Frankenstein used electricity to reanimate an assembly of body parts to create hisreanimation monster. This was based on the 18th century work with electricity by surgeon Luigi Galvani, physicist Alessandro Volta, and Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini.

While dissecting a frog near a dissection machine, Galvani’s assistant touched a scalpel to a nerve in the frog’s leg, and the leg jumped! Galvani believed this was evidence of “animal electricity” which came from the frog itself.

Volta replicated Galvani’s experiments, but arrived at different conclusions. He believed the jumping leg was caused by a bimetallic arc, rather than animal electricity.

Aldini built on the work of his uncle and Volta and toured the capitals of Europe to demonstrate the medical benefits of electricity by electrifying the corpses of executed criminals, making them twitch and in some cases, sit up.

It would not be hard for a creative woman, like Mary Shelley, to extend this research and imagine a day when science might succeed in reanimating the dead. To learn more, come check out the exhibit now on display at the Sciences Library!

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