Love Your Data Week

Love Your Data Week

It’s Love Your Data Week! A five-day international event to help researchers take better care of their data. Did you know there are resources on campus to help you create a management plan to store, organize, document, share, and preserve your research data? Research Data Services can help!

If you have questions about any of the services described above, please contact us for assistance. And make sure to stop by one of the campus libraries this week for candy and a bookmark!

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Janet Weaver wins 2017 ACRL WGSS Significant Achievement Award

Janet Weaver PortraitJanet Weaver Portrait

via Association of College and Research Libraries: http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2017/02/weaver-wins-2017-acrl-wgss-significant-achievement-award

Janet Weaver PortraitCHICAGO – Janet Weaver, assistant curator of the Iowa Women’s Archives at the University of Iowa, is the winner of the 2017 Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) Award for Significant Achievement in Woman’s Studies Librarianship. The WGSS award honors a significant or one-time contribution to women’s studies librarianship.

A plaque will be presented to Weaver at a WGSS event during the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago.

“The Awards Committee was greatly impressed by Weaver’s creation of the Migration is Beautiful website, which is a project constructed from oral histories and other archival material housed at the Iowa Women’s Archives,” said award chair Stacy Russo, librarian and associate professor at Santa Ana College. “Migration is Beautiful was developed from the Iowa Women’s Archives’ Mujeres Latinas project that launched in 2005. The committee especially noted Weaver’s level of collaboration with her colleagues and undergraduate students. The students selected documents for the website and also wrote vignettes. The introduction on the website reads: ‘Migration is Beautiful highlights the contributions Latinas and Latinos have made to Iowa history. Migration is central to understanding and interpreting the past, shaped first by Native Americans, and later by immigrants from around the world.’”

The Migration is Beautiful digital humanities project highlights the contributions of Latinas, their families, and their organizations to Iowa history. Visitors can navigate the site in multiple ways to access hundreds of digitized primary documents and audio clips from oral history interviews through historical topics, life stories, and a migration map.

“Weaver’s work has brought accessibility to primary source documents that were previously only available to visitors at the Iowa Women’s Archives,” continued Russo. “After its launch in 2016, Migration is Beautiful debuted with a travelling exhibit at the national League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) convention in Washington, D.C. In her continued emphasis on outreach, Weaver has made presentations to Latino groups around Iowa regarding the project. Her work has also been featured on Hola Iowa, a news outlet that focuses on Latinos in the Midwest.”

Weaver received her M.A. in Modern History from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.

CONGRATULATIONS JANET!

Migration is Beautiful

 

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Clinical mobile apps | Technology Tour & Meet Up | Wednesday Feb. 15, 2-3pm

Take a tour of some new (and some well-established) apps for your mobile device or smart phone! At this informal brown bag technology meeting, you’ll not only be shown a variety of tools for both academic and clinical use but also invited to share your own examples and experiences. If you don’t have a mobile device, don’t worry: The only necessary smart device is you!

Wednesday, February 15th, 2:00pm-3:00pm (East Information Commons) 

Matt Regan, Clinical Education Librarian

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

No time to meet up?  See what we have available free for you from the library on our guide!  (UpToDate, DynaMed Plus, John Hopkins ABX, FirstConsult and more!)

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871

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DIY Your Valentine’s Day!

Valentine’s Day is already upon us! Have you planned ahead? Do you know what you are going to do? How about creating something that is uniquely yours?

Your Valentine doesn’t have to be a significant other – could be a roommate, parent, child, project partner…. No matter who you choose to be your Valentine – we’ve got the perfect DIY project you can tailor specifically to your special Valentine!

Want to create a romantic setting? How about making your own flickering LED candles? Using a warm white LED for the “flame,” you can create a flameless electronic candle! Nick Dossis, author of Brilliant LED Projects : 20 Electronic designs for Artists, Hobbyists, and Experimenters, provides a parts list, step-by-step instructions, and photos to help you create that mood lighting!

To add to the mood lighting – how about making light dance to music? It is possible! Electronics Projects for Dummies will walk you through making it happen! With complete schematics, parts list, photos, and step-by-step instructions, you’ll be able to create a personalized light board which will have the lights dancing to whatever type of music the mood requires! Brilliant LED Projects has complete instructions for a color-changing disco light, too!

Backpack Illuminator. Brilliant LED Projects. Eng Lib TK9965 .D67 2012

Is your Valentine the outdoorsy type? A backpack illuminator or a bike flasher might be exactly what they want!  Brilliant LED Projects explains how. The project specifications for the backpack illuminator indicate the display comprises 16 tricolor LEDs configured in a 4×4 matrix. Each LED can be controlled independently, colorful flashing images and simple animations can be created, and the supply voltage is 4.5 volts. Parts list, schematics, clear photos, and step-by-step instructions will help light up your Valentine’s backpack – and maybe their heart!

Brilliant LED Projects will also walk you through creating your own LED bike flasher. It explains how to create a “Front LED Flasher,” and a “Rear Red Flasher.” A Valentine’s gift of a bike flasher tells your special someone you want to help keep them safe!

Is your special someone an animal lover?

If you have an aquarium, how about a Raspberry Pi-powered thermometer which will text your cell phone if the aquarium water overheats or becomes too cool! Make: Raspberry Pi and AVR Projects takes you all the way through the project – color photos, parts lists, step-by-step instructions! Want to experiment with a Raspberry Pi before you tackle your project? We have one in our Tool Library! Come in, check it out, and discover all the amazing things you can do!

Love dolphins, but don’t have room in that aquarium? Electronics for Dummies will teach you how to create a wall display of five dolphins, outlined in LEDs, which light up – one after another – making them appear to dance across the wall!.

Lilypad Design Kit. Available in our Tool Library.

Does your Valentine like bling? Make: Wearable Electronics will show you, in detail, how to create wearable tech! Haven’t played with material and circuits before? Don’t worry – we have a Lilypad in our Tool Library! The Lilypad has everything you need to explore adding bling to clothing! It includes the LED lights, conductive fabrics, battery, needles….check it out and get creative! (You can even make the LED flash like a heart beat!)

Flowers? Hearts? We have 3D scanners in our Creative Space! Scan a flower or a special momento! Once it is scanned, it can be printed at either the Engineering Electronics Shop or the Engineering Machine Shop! Need a little more inspiration for the perfect 3D-printable gift? Check out thingiverse for plenty of ideas!

No matter who you have chosen for your Valentine (or Valentines!), they are sure to be ‘in love’ with a DIY gift you crafted just for them!

 

Resources: 

Dossis, Nick. 2012. Brilliant LED projects : 20 electronic designs for artists, hobbyists, and experimenters. New York : McGraw-Hill. Engineering Library TK9965 .D67 2012

Boysen, Earl; Nancy Muir. 2006. Electronics projects for dummies.  Hoboken, NJ : Wiley. Engineering Library TK7819 .M38 2006

Hoile, Cefn. 2015.  Make : Raspberry Pi and AVR projects. Sebastopol, CA : Maker Media.  Engineering Library QA76.8.R15 H65 2015

Hartman, Kate. 2014. Make: wearable electronics. Sebastopol, CA : Maker Media. Engineering Library QA76.592 .H37 2014

Valentine’s Day. thinginverse.com Date accessed: Feb. 10, 2017

Other Resources:

For Star Wars Fans:

An LED light sword: Dossis, Nick. 2012. Brilliant LED projects : 20 electronic designs for artists, hobbyists, and experimenters. New York : McGraw-Hill. Engineering Library TK9965 .D67 2012

Every Star Wars Project Featured on Make: So Far (Over 100). 2017.  makezine.com.

 

 

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Staying Current Workshop

Staying Current Workshop

Wednesday, February 22 at 1-1:50 PM
Sciences Library, room 102

How do you keep up with the news and research in your field? Would you like to learn how to use technology to find new information? Join us for a Staying Current workshop, and learn how to use RSS feeds and other alert options to keep up with blog posts, news, and scholarly articles.

Our workshops are open to everyone and there is no need to register. If you’re interested, but unable to attend this workshop, private appointments and webinars are available. Contact Sara Scheib for more information.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa–sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Sara Scheib in advance at sara-scheib@uiowa.edu.

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Evolution of University of Iowa Urology Department 1915-1949 | History of Medicine Lecture | Thursday, Feb. 23

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invites you to a lecture by Charles Hawtrey, M.D., Professor Emeritus, Department of Urology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine

image Charles Hawtrey

Charles Hawtrey, MD

The Evolution of University Urology as a Reflection of University Priorities  

Thursday, February 23, 2017
5:30pm-6:30pm
2117 MERF (Medical Education and Research Facility)

Dr. Hawtrey will review trends in the Urology Department and the University, focusing on 1915-1949, the Alcock Era.    He will highlight the impact of the Flexner Report, changes in university buildings and the evolution of teaching and research practice.

Please consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871

image old hospital

University Hospital opened in 1899. This building is now called Seashore Hall.

 

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Study hall TODAY!

Faculty, TAs, and instructors are invited to stop by for a Study Hall session today from 11am-3pm in 1140 LIB (Main Library). Staff from the University Libraries, Center for Teaching and Learning Commons will be on hand to answer any teaching technology and research questions as you continue to improve your courses! See you there!

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Melt That Ice!

We haven’t had a lot of ice and snow here in Eastern Iowa,
but winter isn’t over yet!

150409_y50lz_rci-m-salt-truck-back_sn635

 

When we think of those big trucks with the plows, clearing and de-icing our roads, we often call them “sand trucks.” But there is much more than simply sand in those trucks. You know the white stains you get on your shoes and the hem of your pants? Those stains are the result of the salt which is also used for de-icing roads and walkways.

Road salt lowers the freezing point of water, which thaws the ice and allows vehicle tires to reach the pavement for traction. Salt does make winter driving safer, but also leads to corrosion on vehicles – both cars and the road maintenance trucks. The rust and corrosion occurs on the underside of the vehicles making it hard to detect. It is recommended that consumers use car washes – with an under carriage spray – on a regular basis.

A road maintenance truck is made of many different components – not just steel, but many softer metals that can be found in the wiring and other places on the truck. More and more liquid de-icers are being used and they more easily penetrate the nooks and crannies of the truck’s underside, causing more corrosion. There are several methods which are used to minimize the corrosion – coatings, additives, and cleansing techniques. Another option is to do nothing, and accept the lessened equipment lifetime.

The chemicals that are used in the sand and salt mixture are formulated for different temperatures and types of snow.

The effectiveness of a de-icer is measured by the range of temperature in which it provides de-icing in a reasonable length of time. So, after the truck goes by, how long do you need to wait before the roads are safer to travel? Generally that time-frame is about 15-20 minutes.

Different chemicals have differing temperatures at which they are most effective. Calcium Chloride is effective at the lowest temperature, as seen below.

  1. Calcium Chloride (-25o F)
  2. Magnesium Chloride (5o F)
  3. Sodium Acetate (5o F)
  4. Calcium Magnesium Acetate (5oF)
  5. Potassium Chloride (12o F)
  6. Urea (15o F)
  7. Sodium Chloride (20-22o F)
  8. Various Blends (usually 20-22o F)

Here’s an interesting fact: in the United States and Canada, more salt is used on snow and ice than with cooking! Every year, nearly 140 pounds of salt per person are applied to roadways in the US alone. That amounts to over 20 million tons of salt. And that doesn’t include the use of salt on sidewalks, walkways or parking lots!

We sometimes hear the words “snow and ice control.” How is it possible to “control” snow and ice? Interestingly enough, there is a “heat island” effect around major metropolitan areas. The heat that is emitted by those major cities can modify the climate enough that the amount of snowfall is reduced or rain (or freezing rain) falls instead of snow. You’ve heard of covered bridges? They were – and are – built to protect bridges from snow and ice. Ever wonder why bridges are more slippery than the roadways? Both the roadway and the underside of bridges are exposed to the cold, making them more susceptible to ice – those covered bridges protect the top, making the bridges that much safer!

Sand, salt and chemicals are the common ways to de-ice roadways. However, there are some new methods that are gaining traction (see what I did there?). You may have heard that beet juice and brine – cheese brine – are being used to de-ice roadways. A company in Indiana is distributing a sugar beet molasses-based product that is mixed with rock salt. The mixture helps rock salt melt ice below the 15o limit. We know from our pancake and waffle experiences that syrup and molasses are very sticky. That is actually an advantage – that stickiness helps prevent the rock salt from bouncing off roadways as cars drive past.

And, cheese brine? Wisconsin (the “cheese state”) is turning to cheese brine to help with icy roads – it helps keep roads from freezing. Cheese brine is a farm waste product so the Wisconsin DOT often gets the brine for free. The downside is there are environmental concerns about effects on rivers and lakes if significant amounts were to enter the waterways. Another downside is, well, there’s an odor…

Airplane de-icer in action – taken through a snowy plane window.

Of course roads aren’t the only things that need to be de-iced. A patent for “Method and device for de-icing trains” was granted in 2013. A patent for “deicer composition” created for “melting ice on and defrosting a surface such as a windshield of a car” was granted in 1963. And a patent for “De-icing of aircraft” was granted in 2008.

Want a little help clearing your sidewalks and driveways, check out the Autonomous Snowplow Competition!

In case an autonomous snow plow isn’t in your future, there are now a number of different types of snow shovels, snow blowers, and ecological- and pet-friendly de-icers for your driveways and walkways.

Keep a safe distance from road maintenance vehicles, watch for ice and snow on uncleared roadways and be sure to clear your driveway and walkways – in other words – be safe this winter!

Resources:

Nixon, Wilfrid A. 2009. Investigation of materials for the reduction and prevention of corrosion on highway maintenance equipment. Iowa City, IA : IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, University of Iowa. Engineering Library TE233 .N59 2009

Novotny, Vladimir. 1999. Urban and highway snowmelt : minimizing the impact on receiving water. Alexandria, VA : Water Environment Research Foundation. Engineering Library TD427 .S24 U73 1999

Conger, Steven M. 2005. Winter highway operations : a synthesis of highway practice. Washington, D.C. : Transportation Research Board National Research Council. Engineering Library TE220.5 .C6544 2005

Trulove. Rex. 9 Astonishing Facts You Don’t know about Snow and Winter. Dec. 15, 2016. Niume

Minsk, L. David. 1998. Snow and ice control manual for transportation facilities. New York : McGraw-Hill. Engineering Library TE220.5 .M56 1998

Rodman, Kristen, AccuWeather.com Staff Writer. Hidden hazards of road salt: car corrosion can take a toll.  Dec. 15, 2016. accuweather.com 

How Beet Juice Is Helping Keep Roads Safe This Winter. Rhodan, Maya, Sanburn, Josh. February 10, 2014. Time

The Ion Autonomous Snowplow Competition : Saint Paul, MN – Winter Carnival, January 28-31, 2016.

De-icing of aircraftPatent

Method and device for de-icing of trains. Patent

Other Resources:

Wilfrid A. Nixon. Emeritus Faculty, Civil and Environmental Engineering. The University of Iowa College of Engineering.

Nick, Jean. Remove Winter Salt Stains From Pretty Much Anything. Deb. 11, 2016. Rodale’s Organic Life, Rodale Inc. 

Snowplow with deicer spray attachment. Patent

Deicer composition. Patent

Work  Zone Safety. 2017MN Department of Transportation.

Ice & Snow: Take It Slow. Winter travel information. 2016Iowa Department of Transportation.. 2016.

Qiu, Lin and Nixon, Wilfrid A.  Performance measurement for highway winter maintenance operations. 2009. Iowa City, IA : IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, University of Iowa. Engineering Library TE220.5 .Q228 2009

Dore, Guy. Cold regions pavement engineering. 2009. Reston, VA : ASCE Press. Engineering Library TE251 .D67 2009

Breaking the ice. 2006 (accessed Dec. 2016). Peters Chemical Company.

Mergen, Zhaia. Day in the life of snowplow operator. Feb. 8, 2016. Iowa DOT blog

 

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Pietro D’Abano | February 2017 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

Pietro D’Abano painting by Justus van Gent

PIETRO d’ABANO (1250-1315?). Conciliator differentiarum philosophorum et medicorum. Venice: Gabriele di Pietro, for Thomas de Tarvisio, 1476.
Pietro d’Abano was an influential man of his time. A Paduan physician, philospher and astrologer, he was in demand for lectures and teaching.  Dante was among his pupils. For his heretical views he ran afoul of the Inquisition, but died before he could be executed.

The Conciliator is his greatest work. d’Abano presents the scattered medical knowledge, particularly from the Arabic and Grecian schools, in a series of questions with answers from both schools of thought.  d’Abano wanted truth to emerge and contradictions be resolved.  Among his important views presented in this book : air has weight, the heart is the source of veins and arteries, and that the brain is the source of nerves which convey sensation. The Library’s copy is decorated with two fine gilt and colored initials.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

PIETRO d’ABANO (1250-1315?). Conciliator differentiarum philosophorum et medicorum. Venice: Gabriele di Pietro, for Thomas de Tarvisio, 1476.

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Pietro D’Abano | February 2017 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

Pietro D’Abano painting by Justus van Gent

PIETRO d’ABANO (1250-1315?). Conciliator differentiarum philosophorum et medicorum. Venice: Gabriele di Pietro, for Thomas de Tarvisio, 1476.
Pietro d’Abano was an influential man of his time. A Paduan physician, philospher and astrologer, he was in demand for lectures and teaching.  Dante was among his pupils. For his heretical views he ran afoul of the Inquisition, but died before he could be executed.

The Conciliator is his greatest work. d’Abano presents the scattered medical knowledge, particularly from the Arabic and Grecian schools, in a series of questions with answers from both schools of thought.  d’Abano wanted truth to emerge and contradictions be resolved.  Among his important views presented in this book : air has weight, the heart is the source of veins and arteries, and that the brain is the source of nerves which convey sensation. The Library’s copy is decorated with two fine gilt and colored initials.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences. Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

PIETRO d’ABANO (1250-1315?). Conciliator differentiarum philosophorum et medicorum. Venice: Gabriele di Pietro, for Thomas de Tarvisio, 1476.

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