Learn tips for searching Gene, Nucleotide Sequences & Protein Information @Hardin Library this fall

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Instructor Chris Childs Clinical Education and Outreach Librarian

Overwhelmed by the number of databases that the National Center for Biotechnology Information has to offer on nucleotide sequences, genes and proteins?
Wondering which database you should always start with?
Would you like to learn how to set up an NCBI account to link articles in PubMed to records in other databases?
Do you know about PubMed’s Gene Sensor? Are you familiar with the concept of linear navigation?

Learn all of these tips and more in this session that is designed for anyone who needs to search the NCBI databases for genetic information.

Our sessions this fall:

Thursday, September 18, 10:00 – 11:00 am (Location: East Information Commons, 2nd floor, Hardin Library)

Tuesday, October 7, 2:00 – 3:00 pm (Location: East Information Commons)

Tuesday, November 4, 10:00 – 11:00 am (Location: East Information Commons)

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ .  You can also request a personal session if none of these times work for you!

Video Series Visiting Bauman Rare Books

Over the summer members of the University of Iowa Special Collections team visited Las Vegas for the American Library Association and stopped by Bauman Rare Books to chat with Rebecca Romney, who you also might recognize as the rare book appraiser on the History Channel series “Pawn Stars.”  While there they let the cameras roll as they chatted with Rebecca Romney about the rare book field, collecting rare books, and the types of research that rare book dealers do that ends up being incorporated into catalog records and supporting academic research, all while taking a look at some particularly delightful rare books that they had in the shop.

Here is the result of the trip:  A five video series.  Enjoy!

The first video:  Down the Rabbit Hole.  This one includes an edition of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” illustrated by Salvador Dalí.

The second video: The Game is Afoot.  The team analyzes the lasting power of favorite characters such as Sherlock Holmes and Lizzie Bennet who continue to thrive through fan works and new interpretations.

The third video: It’s a First Edition Pride and Prejudice!

The fourth video: Et Tu Brute?   Taking a close look at a Shakespeare quarto (a single play).

The fifth video: We Go West.  A very rare surviving pamphlet, 1848 Latter-Day Saints’ Emigrants’ Guide.

 

Nominate your favorite librarian for Benton Award

The University Libraries is seeking nominations for the Arthur Benton University Librarian’s Award for Excellence. Funded by a generous endowment, this prestigious award acknowledges a library staff member’s professional contributions in the practice of librarianship, service to the profession, scholarship, or leadership which has had a significant impact or innovation to the operations of the Libraries or the University of Iowa. The library staff member will receive $1,500 to be used for professional development activities.

Criteria for the award and the nomination form are available at:   http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/admin/bentonaward/

Nominations are due by Friday, September 26. Please forward this message to faculty and graduate assistants in your department and encourage them to submit nominations. Thank you for your assistance.

*The University Libraries includes the Main Library, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, and the Art, Sciences, Business, Engineering, and Music libraries. (Professional staff in the Law Library and other campus departmental library staff are not eligible.)

A very light mail was recd. at noon to-day but none for me

Joseph Culver Letter, August 31, 1864, Page 1

Head Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
Chattahoochie River, Georgia
August 31st 1864
My Dear Wife

A very light mail was recd. at noon to-day but none for me. We are being mustered for pay to-day, and rumor says we will receive 8 months pay in a few days. There is a paymaster here, and it is probable that he is making arrangements to pay.

We have as yet learned nothing from the Army though various rumors are afloat.1 A reconnaisance was sent out yesterday from our Division in the direction of Atlanta but found no enemy within a mile and did not advance further.2 If it is Sherman’s intention to draw the enemy out of the city, it would be a bad policy to make any demonstration.

About 40 ladies who claimed they were only riding around the lines were seen yesterday riding about on mules. One or two more bold than the rest ventured so close [to] our lines that they were arrested as spies, which they undoubtedly are. One of the ladies captured is from Vicksburg and was known by reputation to Genl. Slocum.3 She has left the latter place since the General, himself, but he was on a visit home for several days. She was very indignant that a Yankee should interfere with a ladie’s ride, but, when informed that her name was upon the list of those who had taken the oath at Vicksburg & that she was found near our lines, she was much more civil.

Yetter had a severe chill at noon & has now a very high fever. I hope it is not serious. Nate [Hill] & all the boys are well. My health is excellent. May our Father in Heaven bless you. I look for the “good news” every day.4

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

P.S. I have but two more stamps but will try and borrow.

  1. On August 31 Union columns as they thrust toward Jonesboro and the Macon & Western Railroad encountered two Confederate corps. The battle that was to seal the fate of Atlanta commenced. Cox, Atlanta, pp. 199-200.
  2. Sherman, not knowing what General Hood’s reaction to his latest movements would be, had ordered the commander of the XX Corps to make a reconnaissance toward Atlanta on the 30th. This force found the Rebels strongly entrenched on Proctor’s Creek and returned. O.R., Ser. I, Vol. XXXVIII, pt. II, p. 330; pt. V, p. 203.
  3. Maj. Gen. Henry L. Slocum had assumed command of the XX Corps, which had been led since General Hooker’s departure on July 28 by Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, the senior division commander. Slocum had commanded the District of Vicksburg until August 14. G.R., Ser. I, Vol. XXXVIII, pt. II, pp. 17, 21. General Hood had been deceived by Sherman’s movements. He deluded himself into believing that Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler’s cavalry raid on the Western & Atlantic Railroad had wrecked the Union supply line causing Sherman to retreat across the Chattahoochie. It was the 28th before Hood learned that he had blundered, and by then it was too late to keep the foe from securing a stranglehold on the Atlanta & West Point Railroad. Cox, Atlanta, pp. 197-98.
  4. This is a reference to the birth of the anxiously awaited baby.

University of Iowa Libraries names Carmelita Pickett Associate University Librarian

PICKETT-CARMELITA-34Carmelita Pickett, collection development officer at Texas A&M University Libraries, has been named associate university librarian for the University of Iowa, effective October 13.

Pickett joined the university libraries at TAMU in 2003 as an Africana studies librarian. In 2009, she became the director of collection development operations and acquisitions services, where she provides leadership to the collection management team with a budget of over $15 million. Responsible for all aspects of the libraries’ collection development strategy, she was instrumental for developing a value statement that is used as an advocacy tool when negotiating with publishers.

Her national service includes elected positions in the Association of College and Research Libraries African American Studies Librarians Section and the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services as well as her appointment to the ACRL Dr. E.J. Josey Spectrum Scholar Mentor Committee and as an ALA Spectrum Scholarship Juror.

“The University of Iowa Libraries is a great library and I’m humbled to be a part of such a dynamic group of professionals,” said Pickett. “It’s an exciting time for research libraries as we position ourselves to better understand and engage the people we serve. The focus of 21st century collections, spaces and services should be to meet the needs and wants of users rather than maintaining old systems and structures that inhibit the academic enterprise in its core mission: research, teaching, and learning.”

“Building a research library for the 21st century requires an innovative approach to building a highly relevant and useful collection that both students and scholars need,” said John Culshaw, University Librarian. “Carmelita has spearheaded projects that have balanced research demands as well as budget priorities. We are excited to have her as part of the Libraries’ senior leadership team as we move forward.”

Pickett will succeed Edward Shreeves who had served as associate university librarian for nearly 25 years until his retirement in 2012. Michael Wright has served as interim associate university librarian since Shreeves’ retirement.

As associate university librarian, Pickett will be an integral part of the Libraries’ administrative team and provide leadership to a group of subject specialist librarians who represent every discipline at the University of Iowa.

Learn PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics @Hardin Library Tuesday 9/2

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Librarian Instructor Amy Blevins

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences.  This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session is:
September 2, 1:00-2:00pm, Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register for this or any of our workshops online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ or by calling 319-335-9151.  You may also request a personal session online.

 

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Yours of date 11 Aug. has just reached me, and it has lifted a load of anxiety from my mind

Joseph Culver Letter, August 22, 1864, Page 1Hd. Quarters Battery “M” Ist Ill. Artillery.
Near Atlanta Ga. 22 Aug. 1864.
Dear Sister Mollie:

Yours of date 11 Aug. has just reached me, and it has lifted a load of anxiety from my mind. Untill today I have not heard a word from Sammy since the 26th of last month. He may have written to me. Our mail of late, has been troubled considerably by the rebel cavalry, and I hope all the letters that have been mailed to me have not reached me – or more plainly speaking, I hope that more letters have been mailed me, than I have yet received. I had a letter today from William S. Murphy. It is quite an affectionate and patriotic missive. He did not say anything about his father’s family. I know but little of them. How are they doing? Your letter is full of news and gratifies me more than it would to “go home and get married.” I do not write to the “girls” any more. You see I am out of note paper, have nothing but this large foolscap – and do not expect to have anything better for one or two years to come – and of course I would not shock their propriety by sending them a letter written on this vulgar sort of paper.

I think it is no pleasure to Jennie Guthrie to have you speak of me to her, therefore I would recommend that you avoid it in future. We used to correspond, but we don’t now. I don’t think I ever saw Robert Kelly, and yet the name sounds wonderfully familiar. Success to him in all his matrimonial enterprises. I guess I had better say something like that and let it go, hadn’t I? or shall I get a leave of absence and go home and call him out. There would be a taste of romance in this latter course! and I think it would please the girls beyond measure, to have us poor deluded swains shootings one an other’s heads off for their sakes. Yes, it wood please them too well – guess I shant do it. And it would detract from the dignity of us ‘Lords of Creation to fight about women. How does Jennie look now? What sort of a girl is she? I do not know her. As much as I have seen her and as much as I have been in her company, I am not well acquainted with her. I was not aware that Thomas did not take a share that boat, as he contemplated doing. I have not heard from him in some time – in a long time. I will write to him and see how he is getting along. I have not seen Frank for three weeks, but heard from him a few days ago. He was well.

With love, Mollie, Goodbye. Write me often.

Affectionately Johnie.
Lieut Battery “M” 1st Ill. Artillery
4 Army Corps Dept. Cumberland

Online Videos of Engineering Failures Now Available!

The Lichtenberger Engineering Library has a new database for steaming videos!

Engineering case study online - Kari's Edits

 

This database is called Engineering Case Studies Online (http://purl.lib.uiowa.edu/EnginCaseStud)

Engineering Case Studies Online is a multi-media database chronicling the field’s most noteworthy failures, such as the Chernobyl Disaster, Ford Pinto Controversy, Apollo 13 and more. Designed to meet classroom and research needs across a range of engineering disciplines—such as aerospace, mechanical, nuclear, and civil—the collection brings together nuanced information about complex case studies into one database. It aims to incorporate diverse perspectives and materials, presented in a balanced way, to enable through analysis. Pulling together 250 hours of video and 50,000 pages of full-text material upon completion, the collected materials include video documentaries and primary footage, audio transcripts and witness testimony; images, maps, accident reports, blueprints, and other key archival content, monographs and articles, as well as timelines and simulations.

Emma’s founding mothers visit the Archives

This post was written by Jessica Lawson, Graduate Research Assistant in the Iowa Women’s Archives.

 

(Clockwise from left) Sondra Smith, Barb Yates, Dale McCormick, Gayle Sand, and Francie Hornstein.

(Clockwise from left) Sondra Smith, Barb Yates, Dale McCormick, Gayle Sand, and Francie Hornstein.

 

The Iowa Women’s Archives had an exciting visit at the end of July! Five founding members of Iowa City’s Emma Goldman Clinic—Dale McCormick, Sondra Smith, Gayle Sand, Barb Yates, and Francie Hornstein—reunited to look through this feminist health clinic’s records and share memories of its early days. The Emma Goldman Clinic (fondly known as “Emma”) is a not-for-profit healthcare and family planning provider whose records are housed at the Archives.

 

Barb Yates, Francie Hornstein, and Dale McCormick looking at Ain't I a Woman, published by the Women's Liberation Front in Iowa City in the early 1970s.

Barb Yates, Francie Hornstein, and Dale McCormick looking at Ain’t I a Woman, published by the Women’s Liberation Front in Iowa City in the early 1970s.

 

The collections we brought out for the founders’ visit, as well as the stories they shared, reflect the rich interconnections among women’s organizations and social justice movements in Iowa City in the 1970s. In addition to the material in the Emma Goldman Clinic Records themselves, the history of the clinic is woven through the personal papers of two of the visitors (Dale McCormick and Sondra Smith), as well as other local activists like Jill Jack and Linda Yanney and organizations such as the Women’s Resource and Action Center (WRAC). The women laughed as they told stories about staging a feminist revision of Taming of the Shrew, proudly compared their work on Ain’t I a Woman (the newsletter of the Iowa City Women’s Liberation Front) to the work of women’s groups in New York City in the 1970s, and paused to celebrate the memory of Iowa Women’s Archives co-founder Louise Noun. They even found time to help us identify some of the faces in the old photographs.