ENDNOTE WORKSHOP

Are you starting a new research paper or project and looking for a way to manage your references? Then join us for this useful and informative workshop about EndNote! EndNote is a citation management program supported by the UI Libraries. The web version is available for free to the entire UI community and the desktop client is available for free to UI faculty, staff, graduate and professional students.

ENDNOTE WORKSHop

Wed, Dec 3 12:30-1:20

3rd floor Sciences Library

In this workshop, you will learn how to:

  • Sign up for (or download) EndNote for free!
  • Transfer existing references from other services to EndNote;
  • Export references from popular databases for importing into EndNote;
  • Use EndNote to organize and share references;
  • Use EndNote to format a bibliography in one of thousands of different styles;
  • Use the Cite While You Write plugin for Microsoft Word;
  • Get help when you need it!

 

This workshop is free and open to all UI students, faculty and staff. There is no need to register. If you have any questions, please contact Sara Scheib at sara-scheib@uiowa.edu or (319) 335-3024.

Aluka Collections – Trial ends 15 December 2014

 World Heritage Sites: Africa is made up of 20 sub-collections and more than 57,000 objects, linking visual, contextual, and spatial documentation of African heritage sites. The collection includes photographs, 3D models, GIS data, site plans, aerial and satellite photography, images of rock art, excavation reports, manuscripts, traveler’s accounts, historical and antiquarian maps, books, articles, and other scholarly research.

Struggles for Freedom: Southern Africa focuses on the complex and varied liberation struggles in the region, with an emphasis on Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The collection consists of more than 190,000 pages of documents and images, including periodicals, nationalist publications, records of colonial government commissions, local newspaper reports, personal papers, correspondence, UN documents, out-of-print and other particularly relevant books, oral histories, and speeches.

Please send additional comments to Edward Miner.

Database of the Week: Academic Search Elite

Each week we will highlight one of the many databases we have here at the Pomerantz Business Library.

The database: Academic Search Elite

Where to find it: You can find it here, and under W in the databases A-Z list. Academic_Search_Elite

Use it to find:

  • Academic articles from all disciplines, including: marketing, economics, management, banking, finance, and investing, etc.
  • Full-text journals, magazines, and other resources (reviews, newspapers, trade publications)
  • This is a great place to start your research, especially if it is an interdisciplinary topic

Tips for searching:

  • Use the quick search bars at the top
  • Use drop down menu to select a specif field to search: Author, Title, Subject Terms, Company entity, NAICS code, etc.
  • Use the left-hand bar to refine your search by: Source type, Publication, Company, Geography, NAICS/Industry, etc.

Demos: Check out the following demo:

Want help using Academic Search Elite? Contact Willow or Kim and set up an appointment.

Vesalius Turns the Page on Ancient Medicine Lecture @Hardin Library Thursday, November 20

portrait of VesaliusThe University of Iowa History of Medicine Society, The Classics Department, and the Center for the Book invite you to a lecture by Daniel Garrison, Emeritus Professor, Department of Classics, Northwestern University on “Vesalius Turns the Page on Ancient Medicine.”  The lecture is free and open to the public.  The lecture will be held on Thursday,  November 20 from 5:30pm-6:30pm at The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.

This talk concentrates on the procedural contributions Vesalius made in his 1543 De humani corporis fabrica. Vesalius began his medical studies at the University of Paris, which was still a conservative institution that relied heavily on readings from Galen and later Medieval summaries and required little or no dissection, even of animals. Vesalius introduced a new regimen at the University of Padua that called for  dissection by the students  and visual testing of anatomy rather than dependence upon books.

from De humani corporis fabrica

Skeleton from De Humani Corporis Fabrica

De humani corporis fabrica is one of the most important anatomy books ever published, and the John Martin Rare Book Room owns a first edition.  You may view this book or others from our collection by visiting the John Martin Rare Book Room.  Some images are also available in the Iowa Digital Library.

 

 

 

 

 

Contributing in code

University of Iowa Libraries at GitHub.com

University of Iowa Libraries at GitHub.com

For librarians, particularly those in academic settings, an important part of the job is contributing to the development of the profession; traditionally, this has included tasks such as giving presentations at conferences and publishing articles in scholarly journals. But thanks to the evolving nature of our work and to innovations on the part of our developers, the University of Iowa Libraries has become active in a new area of professional development: sharing code for re-use and adaptation by other institutions.

When George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media launched Scripto, an NEH-funded open-source tool for transcription crowdsourcing projects, we were eager to adopt it for DIY History to replace our existing makeshift and labor-intensive system. Once it was installed, we became even more eager to make extensive changes to Scripto. While the tool was designed to treat transcription as an add-in activity for digital exhibits, we needed it front and center for DIY History.

DRP’s developers, Shawn Averkamp (now at New York Public Library) and Matthew Butler, solved this problem by adding new features to Scripto and creating a simple-to-use theme that focuses exclusively on the act of transcription. Other enhancements included a progress system for tracking completion status, as well as various scripts for migrating mass quantities of objects and metadata from our digital library to DIY History and back again. As it turned out, we weren’t the only ones looking for these functionalities. In the open source spirit of sharing work for the good of the community, Shawn and Matthew made their enhancements and related code available online, where it’s been reused by a number of other institutions [see below].

As we prepare to launch a redesigned and streamlined DIY History soon, we’re grateful for the open source tools that have allowed us to make progress on our own project, and thrilled to have contributed to the development of crowdsourcing sites at other libraries and museums.

“DIY History and similar projects are about community” says Matthew Butler, the Libraries’ Multimedia Consultant. “They succeed because of the collaborative efforts of transcribers, developers, librarians, and curators to make the content and tools as accessible as possible.”

DIY History | University of Iowa Libraries

DIY History | University of Iowa Libraries

The Civil War in Letters | The Newberry Library

The Civil War in Letters | The Newberry Library

Making History | Library of Virginia

Making History | Library of Virginia

Jones' Icones Online | University of Oxford

Jones’ Icones Online | University of Oxford

Virtual Volunteering | Carnamah Historical Society & Museum

Virtual Volunteering | Carnamah Historical Society & Museum

DIY History celebrates 50,000th transcription!

cake5

As DIY History, the University of Iowa’s transcription crowdsourcing site, has inched toward its 50,000th submission, we’ve been looking forward to reaching such an amazing milestone — hence the queued-up cake gif.

But as it turned out, we weren’t quite prepared for how it went down today. On the heels of some high-profile attention from BuzzFeed and NBC News in October, DIY History just hit the big time with a Tumblr post from Kate Beaton of Hark! A Vagrant fame, which was rebloggged by John Green, of The Fault in Our Stars and many other things. Once a portion of their millions of devoted followers visited our site, the 50K achievement was immediately unlocked — along with a fair amount of panic among library staff about insufficient server bandwith and a dearth of untranscribed pages (plus Colleen wept with joy) (although low threshold)(we love you Colleen!).

We are humbled and gratified by the dedication of all our volunteer transcribers — those of you who have just joined us, and those who have been with us from the beginning. Since the Libraries put its first batch of Civil War diaries up in the spring of 2011, you have fought a brave battle against inaccessibility and illegibility, rescuing the first-hand accounts of soldiers, cooks, students, railroad barons, farmers, artists, suffragists, and so many others. In lieu of the celebratory cake we wish we could give you, here is a comprehensive list of the Libraries’ thousands of historic manuscript cake recipes — an unthinkingly time-consuming task pre-crowdsourcing, the compilation of such a list now happens almost instantly, thanks to the magic of fully-searchable transcribed text. Happy baking, and don’t forget to stock up on lard.

While you’re busy with that, we’ll be powering up our scanners to get new content on the site as quickly as possible, so please stop back soon and often. The next 50,000 manuscript pages starts now!

Four Million Downloads!

Items in Iowa Research Online have been downloaded more than four million times! This means that scholarship created by University of Iowa faculty, researchers and students is being read around the world. We crossed the three million mark in late January 2014; it is so very exciting to have had such an increase in just over nine months that we are dancing in our cubicles.

ancers at a party at Esther Walls' apartment, New York, N.Y., 1960s

Our theses and dissertation make up over half the use, which is great evidence of the fantastic scholarship done by our graduates. The journals Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and Medieval Feminist Forum each have had two-three hundred thousand downloads. Congratulations to the editors of these journals for producing such quality publications.

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

If you would like your scholarship in Iowa Research Online, please contact your subject specialist for more information.

Historically mustachioed

In celebration of Movember and of Digital Research & Publishing’s sometimes very hirsute new department head, we’re reprising a few of last year’s Great Mustaches of the Iowa Digital Library:

UI President Charles A. Schaeffer, 1893 | University of Iowa Yearbooks

UI President Charles A. Schaeffer, 1893 | University of Iowa Yearbooks

J.L. Small, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

J.L. Small, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

L.K. Fullerton, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

L.K. Fullerton, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

Find your own favorites! Probably here: digital.lib.uiowa.edu/dentistry

Learn how to use Scopus & Web of Science @Hardin Library Friday, November 7

 

Scopus is a multidisciplinary database with substantial international coverage. All citations that are in EMBASE are also in Scopus. Scopus also allows you to track an article’s cited and citing references. Come to this hands-on session and learn how to search Scopus systematic reviews.

Web of Science is a citation database which covers over 10,000 journals. Web of Science specializes in citation tracking so this hands-on session will concentrate on how to do cited reference searches to find articles that cite your work. The session also demonstrates how to use the Journal Citation Index and find impact factors for journals in your discipline.

This workshop is free and available to all. Register online for this or any of our other workshops: http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ .

This workshop will be at Hardin Library, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor from 10am-11am.

Tom Keegan Named Head of Digital Research & Publishing

The University of Iowa Libraries has hired Tom Keegan as Head of Digital Research & Publishing. A Rhetoric faculty member and co-director of the IDEAL (Iowa Digital Engagement & Learning) initiative, Keegan has a partial appointment with the Libraries until January, when he will assume full-time duties leading DRP.

In this position Keegan will build on the Libraries’ work leveraging digital collections, resources, and expertise to support faculty and student Tom Keeganscholars. Founded in 2006, Digital Research & Publishing coordinates and maintains the Iowa Digital Library, a million-object database of digitized special collections and archival materials, plus digital content from campus and community partners such as the UI Museum of Art, the Office of the State Archaeologist, and the Writing University. DRP also offers hosting and management of the University’s scholarly output via its institutional repository, Iowa Research Online, and journal publishing services for the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and other titles. Additional projects include DIY History, a participatory archives initiative, and University of Iowa Press Digital Editions, a collaboration between the Libraries and the Press to provide free online access to select UIP books.

Before joining the Libraries, Keegan taught at the University beginning in 2003, most recently as a lecturer for the Department of Rhetoric. His teaching and research address the use of digital humanities and publicly engaged pedagogies across a variety of curriculums. With Matt Gilchrist, he co-directs IDEAL, which encourages assignment innovation and fosters expanded access to TILE learning spaces. One such assignment, Archives Alive!, incorporates DIY History to engage undergraduate students with digital scholarship practices in learning research, writing, and presentation skills. Keegan received his Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Iowa, and his undergraduate degrees in English Literature and Bioethics from the University of Virginia.

The new position in the Libraries allows Keegan to remain connected to the innovative teaching and curriculum projects he’s developed in partnership with the Rhetoric Department, Tippie College of Business, the UI Honors Program, the College of Education, the UI Graduate School, ITS and SITA, the Studio, the Center for Teaching, the English Department, Hancher, the Iowa City Downtown District, Public Space One, and a variety of other people and units within the UI and Iowa City communities. He is also continuing his humanities scholarship by collaborating with Libraries’ staff to develop a digital project based on spatial rhetoric in the works of James Joyce.

“I’m thrilled to be working with such innovative and talented people,” says Keegan. “Digital Research & Publishing plays a crucial role in bringing together a variety of audiences for research and learning in the 21st century.”