Change EndNote Desktop Settings to Find Full-text

The UI Libraries migrated to a new library catalog in July.  This change means you need to change your EndNote settings in order to find full-text articles. Below are instructions on how to make the changes on a PC. For more instructions on using EndNote, visit the website (EndNote Desktop tip sheet for PCs | EndNote Desktop tip sheet for Macs) or contact your librarian. Full text availability is limited to journals the UI Libraries subscribe to electronically which have full text available.

Set up EndNote to Find Full-Text

  1. From the Edit menu, select Preferences
  2. Click on Find Full Text.
  3. In the Open URL Path box, enter http://uilink.lib.uiowa.edu/view/uresolver/01IOWA_INST/openurl
  4. If you are using EndNote from off-campus, you will need to enter https://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login beside the box labeled Authentication URL.
find full text EndNote
Enable UILink (formerly InfoLink)
  1. From the Edit menu, select Preferences
  2. Click on URLS and Links
  3. Paste http://uilink.lib.uiowa.edu/view/uresolver/01IOWA_INST/openurl into the box labeled ISI Base URL.  You can now click OK.screenshot from EndNote

 

Change EndNote Desktop settings to find full-text

endnote-nieuw

The UI Libraries migrated to a new library catalog in July.  This change means you need to change your EndNote settings in order to find full-text articles.  Full text availability is limited to journals the UI Libraries subscribe to electronically which have full text available.

Set up EndNote to Find Full-Text:

1.    From the EndNote X7 menu, select Preferences.
2.    Click on Find Full Text in the left frame.
4.    If you are using EndNote from off-campus, you will need to enter https://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login beside the box labeled Authentication URL.

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Finding a Hidden Gem

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

20160726_131745Finding a hidden gem makes Book Repair Supervisor Susan’s day fun. While repairing a book spine, Susan discovered this stiffener (liner) inside the spine; spine liners often were cut from scraps of paper, sometimes unused pages from books already produced by the bindery. The book she was repairing was published in 1926, so the paper liner is older.
20160726_13250720160802_144109

Posted in Uncategorized

Andrés de Laguna de Laguna | August 2016 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library

Andrés Laguna

ANDRES DE LAGUNA (1499-1560). Anatomica methodus, seu De sectione humani corporis contemplatio. Paris: Apud Ludovicum Cyaneum, 1535. 

Andrés Laguna

Andrés Laguna

Laguna, a native of Segovia, Spain, began his education in medicine at Paris in 1532. While in Paris he published his first three books and became acquainted with Vesalius.

By 1539,  Laguna published over 30 books, many on medical botany–one of his great interests. This work is one of his earliest and was simultaneously published in Paris by Jacob Kerver.  Laguna notes in the dedication that he spent only three months preparing the work and comments that, in his view, the medical profession of his day had fallen to a very low state.

picture from anatomy book

from Anatomica methodus, seu De sectione humani corporis contemplatio by Laguna

Written in a forthright manner, the book has a strong personal tone and cites few authorities but generally supports the views of Aristotle and Galen. Laguna begins his anatomy with the mouth because that is where the nutritive process is initiated and finishes with the brain where the spirits receive their complete transmutation. He cites few personal observations or autopsies and adds little to the progress of anatomy.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.  Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

View a digital version of this book from Complutense University of Madrid.

Bindings, UI Libraries Magazine, features story on Regional Medical Library @Hardin

Hardin Library in 1974, just after opening

The Spring issue of Bindings has a story on Hardin Library’s $6.5 million dollar grant and designation as a Regional Medical Library.  Bindings also contains other information about the University of Iowa Libraries services, programs, and exhibits.

Hardin Library in 1974, just after opening

Hardin Library in 1974, just after opening

Read the complete issue online.

Request printed copies.

 

 

 

Van Allen Explorer Tapes in DPN

Van Allen Explorer Tapes Prior to Recovery (MacLean Hall 3/25/2010)

Van Allen Explorer Tapes Prior to Recovery (MacLean Hall 3/25/2010)

In May of this year, the University of Iowa Libraries became the first institution to deposit material into the Digital Preservation Network. You can read more about this on the DPN website or listen to an interview with about the process of adding this collection to DPN. As a member of DPN, the Libraries can deposit 5TB of data per year, and DPN guarantees that this data will be preserved for 20 years. The Libraries chose the Explorer I audio tapes from the James Van Allen Collection as its initial deposit for a variety of reasons:

  1. The expense of reformatting these items – If any of the digital files were lost, it would be too costly to reformat them again.
  2. The inability to reformat them with equipment in the library
  3. The poor condition of some of the originals
  4. The location of the original audio reels – they are no longer located on site making it harder to reformat them again
  5. The rarity of the items
  6. The research value of the collection

So far 500GB (300 audio reels) of Explorer I have been uploaded into DPN. Another 400 reels will be added in the near future. The deposit of this material marks the end of a long process of discovering and digitizing the original reel to reel audio tapes. Read more about the Van Allen Collection here:

http://explorer.lib.uiowa.edu/about

The Digital Preservation Network (DPN) is the only large-scale digital preservation service that is built to last beyond the life spans of individuals, technological systems, and organizations. DPN provides members of the academy and their successors with assurance that future access to their scholarly resources will be available in the event of disruptive change in administrative or physical institutional environments. By establishing a redundant and varied technical and legal infrastructure the survival, ownership and management of preserved digital content in the future is assured for DPN members.

Posted in Uncategorized

Special Collections News & Updates 7/29/2016

Doom Patrol comic book coverNewsfeed: Documenting and Treating Scrolls: Part 3 Final from the “Preservation Beat” blog. http://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/preservation/2016/07/27/documenting-and-treating-scrolls-part-3-final/ A Visit to Himie Voxman’s Hometown from Iowa Now.  http://now.uiowa.edu/2016/07/visit-himie-voxmans-hometown James Alan McPherson, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Writer, […]

Meet IWA’s Graduate Assistants

Image of Katie and RachelImage of Katie and Rachel

Image of Katie and Rachel

While these two fabulous ladies aren’t brand new to IWA, they both recently accepted positions as graduate assistants for the up-coming semesters.

Rachel Black grew up in the southwestern corner of Iowa in a tiny town that had more ponies than people. Now living in the Iowa City area, she hopes to graduate with a MLIS this December.

Her archives journey began last summer as a volunteer working on the Myrtle Hinkhouse papers. She is excited to tackle more collections this fall.

Outside of the archives, Rachel can be found knitting poorly constructed hand towels, messing up her kitchen while baking, losing arrows on the archery range, and just generally enjoying her life.

Katie Gandhi still doesn’t know what she wants to be when she grows up, but she does know she loves libraries, history, people, and archives. Other past-times include hiking, painting, weaving, and playing cello.

Since being hired in January, her primary focus has been helping Janet prepare content for the IWA’s “Migration is Beautiful” project Omeka site, which went live on July 5th.

Katie just finished an M.S. in Urban and Regional Planning and will be working to complete her M.A. in Library and Information Science this year.

Posted in Uncategorized

Find James Alan McPherson’s work at the UI Libraries

James-Alan-McPhersonWEB

James-Alan-McPhersonWEBWriter James Alan McPherson, professor in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and winner of the Pulitzer, MacArthur, and Guggenheim, died July 27, 2016. He was 72.

Find these two McPherson works at the UI Libraries:

Crabcakes  —  Main Library PS3563.A45544 Z476 1998

A region not home: reflections from exile — Main Library PS3563.A45544 .R4 2000

 

Posted in Uncategorized