DIY History celebrates 50,000th transcription!

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As DIY History, the University of Iowa’s transcription crowdsourcing site, has inched toward its 50,000th submission, we’ve been looking forward to reaching such an amazing milestone — hence the queued-up cake gif.

But as it turned out, we weren’t quite prepared for how it went down today. On the heels of some high-profile attention from BuzzFeed and NBC News in October, DIY History just hit the big time with a Tumblr post from Kate Beaton of Hark! A Vagrant fame, which was rebloggged by John Green, of The Fault in Our Stars and many other things. Once a portion of their millions of devoted followers visited our site, the 50K achievement was immediately unlocked — along with a fair amount of panic among library staff about insufficient server bandwith and a dearth of untranscribed pages (plus Colleen wept with joy) (although low threshold)(we love you Colleen!).

We are humbled and gratified by the dedication of all our volunteer transcribers — those of you who have just joined us, and those who have been with us from the beginning. Since the Libraries put its first batch of Civil War diaries up in the spring of 2011, you have fought a brave battle against inaccessibility and illegibility, rescuing the first-hand accounts of soldiers, cooks, students, railroad barons, farmers, artists, suffragists, and so many others. In lieu of the celebratory cake we wish we could give you, here is a comprehensive list of the Libraries’ thousands of historic manuscript cake recipes — an unthinkingly time-consuming task pre-crowdsourcing, the compilation of such a list now happens almost instantly, thanks to the magic of fully-searchable transcribed text. Happy baking, and don’t forget to stock up on lard.

While you’re busy with that, we’ll be powering up our scanners to get new content on the site as quickly as possible, so please stop back soon and often. The next 50,000 manuscript pages starts now!

30th Anniversary Benefit Auction: The Anthony Fund

Proceeds from the Conservation Lab’s 30th Anniversary Auction will benefit the William Anthony Conservation Fund. To find out more about the auction, click here.

Biography of William Anthony

William (Bill) Anthony was born November 9, 1926, in Waterford, Ireland, and began his apprenticeship in bookbinding at the age of 16, later working as a journeyman in Ireland and England. In 1965 Bill came to Chicago to work as a fine binder at the Cuneo Press, where he rose to the position of art director.  In 1973, he formed a partnership with Elizabeth Kner and, on her retirement in 1982, continued the business as Anthony & Associates, Bookbinders. While conservation was the mainstay of his business, Bill also worked on edition and fine bindings, and taught apprentices and private students.

In 1984, Bill came to The University of Iowa as the first University Conservator.  He established the Conservation Department in the University’s Main Library, where he and his apprentices worked on rare books from the University collections, including the Nuremburg Chronicle (1493) and Vesalius’ De humani corporis fabrica (1555).  He also executed fine bindings, most of which are in Special Collections at the UI Main Library.

In the Conservation Department at Iowa, Bill continued to train apprentices and interns, and offered classes to the University community.  A former apprentice from the Chicago days, David Brock, said of Bill that he “molded me gently into a craftsman.”  All those who studied with him – apprentices, interns, students, and casual visitors – could say something similar.  Bill did not like to criticize but he had an idea of excellence and he wanted to move others in that direction.  The esteem in which he was held by his professional colleagues led to his chairing the Standards Committee of the Guild of Bookworkers from 1984 to 1988. Bill’s notable achievements at Iowa include starting the University of Iowa Bookbinding Models Collection and conserving the original constitution of the state of Iowa, which he completed shortly before his death in February 1989.

William Anthony Conservation Fund

The  William Anthony Conservation Fund was established through the generous support of Julie Scott and Jim Fluck, to honor the legacy of Bill Anthony. Since its inception, the Fund has supported a variety of departmental activities, including conservation treatment, equipment purchases, and bringing visiting lecturers to Iowa City.  Some highlights are listed below.

Conservation Rebinding of 18th Century Pamphlets

Paper Case Pamphlets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
The  task of rebinding over seventy 18th century pamphlets included two challenges: separating groups of 18th century pamphlets bound in 20th century library bindings and developing a functional, graceful and sympathetic conservation treatment that would facilitate scanning and exhibition.

The treatment included a collation check, surface cleaning, disassembly of gatherings, optional water washing, mending, endpaper production and re-sewing. The covers for the pamphlets used hand made cover paper stock produced here at the University of Iowa. This distinctive paper was especially created to simulate the stocks used for historical paper case work as it provides the type of excellent handling, toughness and color qualities which are so complimentary to such 18th century text papers.

Lecture by Pamela Spitzmueller

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Pamela Spitzmueller was the University of Iowa Libraries’ Conservator from 1989 – 1999. Spitzmueller’s lecture, “Books as Physical Objects or How Conserving Damaged Rare Books and Manuscripts Inspired Me to Create New Book Objects” will cover her 35 year career in library conservation and book arts, from Chicago (Newberry Library), Washington, DC (Library of Congress), Iowa City (University of Iowa Library) and Cambridge, MA (Harvard University Library).

She has presented many lectures on historical book structures and created workshops on long and link stitch sewing; girdle books; a multi-quire, wooden-boarded codex from Egypt and most recently a model of a 17th c. printed Almanac for tradesmen with erasable pages.  Pamela is also a retired Paper and Book Intensive Co-director where she has taught many classes.

To give to the William Anthony Conservation Fund, please visit www.givetoiowa.org/libraries

Posted in Uncategorized

Four Million Downloads!

Items in Iowa Research Online have been downloaded more than four million times! This means that scholarship created by University of Iowa faculty, researchers and students is being read around the world. We crossed the three million mark in late January 2014; it is so very exciting to have had such an increase in just over nine months that we are dancing in our cubicles.

ancers at a party at Esther Walls' apartment, New York, N.Y., 1960s

Our theses and dissertation make up over half the use, which is great evidence of the fantastic scholarship done by our graduates. The journals Walt Whitman Quarterly Review and Medieval Feminist Forum each have had two-three hundred thousand downloads. Congratulations to the editors of these journals for producing such quality publications.

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

If you would like your scholarship in Iowa Research Online, please contact your subject specialist for more information.

Open Access in Geography

Earlier this year, , Liaison/Scholarly Communication Librarian at Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada, lead a presentation called “Shifting Ground: Scholarly Communication in Geography.” It was at the Canadian Association of Geographers meeting in May.  Among the highlights include a discussion on Open Access issues, guidelines for picking journals to publish your work, the problems with metrics to measure scholarly impact, and negotiating your copyright. She her Slides and transcript

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Making the transition from RefWorks to EndNote? Learn how @Hardin Library this fall

As the University of Iowa moves to EndNote as its official citation management solution, we at Hardin are here to help with the transition from RefWorks (or any other tool).  At this quick workshop, you will learn how to collect your citations and bibliographic data and then import it into EndNote.

Our upcoming sessions at Hardin Library, Information Commons East, 2nd floor:
Wednesday, November 12, 2:30-3pm

Thursday, November 20, 10:30-11am

Tuesday, December 9, 9:30-10am

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/

No time for class? Just need a little help?  See our guide:  http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/citingsources/HardinEndNoteDesktop

endnote graphic

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PTSD Exhibit at Hardin through December

image of veterans

Image from VA.gov

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences has an exhibit on post traumatic stress disorder up through December.  The exhibit includes a time-line of the history of PTSD from 2000 BC-present, and resources for patients or clinicians. AboutFace from the Veteran’s Administration has videos available with personal stories from veterans with PTSD.

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North American Indian Drama - Trial ends 14 December 2014

This edition of North American Indian Drama contains 244 plays by 48 playwrights. More than half of the works are previously unpublished, and hard to find, representing groups such as Cherokee, Métis, Creek, Choctaw, Pembina Chippewa, Ojibway, Lenape, Comanche, Cree, Navajo, Rappahannock, Hawaiian/Samoan, and others.

Please send additional comments to Stephen Sturgeon.

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Blowing in the Wind

U.S. Patent 5,638,574 Convertible leaf blower and vacuum

Haupt, David J. & Houge, Michael S. Convertible leaf blower and vacuum. U.S. Patent 5,638,574, filed July 21, 1995 and issued June 17, 1997

Autumn is a beautiful season: waning days of warmth, cool nights, and dramatic color. All is blissful until the leaves fall from the trees covering the ground with a thick mass of debris. So begins the raking…or blowing.

The Invention

Although not confirmed, it widely is believed that the leaf blower was invented by Dom Quinto in the late 1950s. It originally was introduced in the United States as an agricultural sprayer, but soon manufacturers saw an opportunity to use the blower as a lawn and garden maintenance tool.

Environmental Impact

Emissions from gasoline-powered leaf blowers, noise, carbon monoxide as well as airborne particulates are common complaints of the leaf blower. To minimize some of these side-effects, the leaf blower is governed by the U.S. E.P.A. emission standards for small engines, and to counteract the noise, several American cities have ordinances restricting lawn blower usage or mandating decibel levels. In fact, Caremel-by-the-Sea and Beverly Hills banned the implement in the 1970s citing it a noise nuisance.

So don’t throw out the rake just yet.

European Patent Application Backpack Leaf Blower

Thackery, Clinton C. and Long, Charles Keith. Backpack leaf blower. EP268444, filed May 20, 2013 and issued January 15, 2014.

References

Determination Particulate Emission Rates from Leaf Blowers. Report written by Dennis Fitz, David Pankratz, Sally Pederson, and James Bristow, College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, CA and Gary Arcemont, San Joaquin Unified Air Pollution Control District, Fresno, CA.

Glasner, Joanna. “The Silence of the Leaf Blowers.” September 23, 2005.

Haupt, David J. & Houge, Michael S. Convertible leaf blower and vacuum. U.S. Patent 5,638,574, filed July 21, 1995 and issued June 17, 1997

Lawn and Garden (Small Gasoline) Equipment, United States Environmental Protection Agency web page

“Leaf-blower regulations nationwide,” ConsumerReports.org, September 2010

Leaf Blower Report by the California Environmental Protection Agency Air Resources Board

Outdoor Power Equipment Internal Combustion Engine-Powered Handheld and Backpack Blowers and Blower-Vacuums Safety Requirements and Performance Testing Procedures ANSI/OPEI B175.2-2012 (with A1-2013) (Source: TechStreet)

Thackery, Clinton C. and Long, Charles Keith. Backpack leaf blower. EP268444, filed May 20, 2013 and issued January 15, 2014

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Historically mustachioed

In celebration of Movember and of Digital Research & Publishing’s sometimes very hirsute new department head, we’re reprising a few of last year’s Great Mustaches of the Iowa Digital Library:

UI President Charles A. Schaeffer, 1893 | University of Iowa Yearbooks

UI President Charles A. Schaeffer, 1893 | University of Iowa Yearbooks

J.L. Small, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

J.L. Small, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

L.K. Fullerton, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

L.K. Fullerton, 1885 | Dentistry College Class Photographs

Find your own favorites! Probably here: digital.lib.uiowa.edu/dentistry