Health News from the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) Office @Hardin Library | February 2017

The GMR Office is using its Facebook page to help members make connections between health news and available National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources and databases.

Health news is presented to us daily and the GMR Office hopes to increase health literacy by linking these current health issues to a variety of resources to help its members get the most out of their healthcare.

NPR published “Caring For A Loved One At Home Can Have A Steep Learning Curve,” which stated that about 44 million Americans are unpaid family caregivers, such as parents, children, and spouses caring for their elderly, sick, or disabled loved ones. The article mentions that many of these family caregivers don’t receive enough training to properly provide care.

The GMR Office posted the article to its Facebook page and directed readers to NLM 4 Caregivers, a collection of over 16 health databases from the specialized information services branch of the NLM and NIH. These include ClinicalTrials.gov to help caregivers find and research clinical trials; Pillbox, which can help caregivers identity unlabeled or lost medications; and the Drug Information Portal to help caregivers look up side effects, the manufacturer’s drug label, and references to the drug in scientific journals.

Many consumers aren’t aware of the vast variety of free and trusted health resources available through the NLM, but the GMR hopes to remind its members of their existence, one news story at a time.

Posted in Uncategorized

Need help organizing your citations and writing papers? | EndNote Desktop workshops this Spring @Hardin Library

EndNote is a reference management tool that helps you to easily gather together your references in one place, organize them, and then insert them into papers and format them in a style of your choosing. This session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format your citations. The class will be hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our sessions this semester:
Thursday, February 2nd, 10:00-11:00am (East Information Commons, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences)
Thursday, March 9th, 10:00-11:00am (East Information Commons, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences)
Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

EndNote Desktop is available FREE from the UI Libraries to all graduate students, faculty and staff.  Download your own copy.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871

Posted in Uncategorized

New Journal Metric: CiteScore

Scopus, a multi-disciplinary literature database, has recently launched CiteScore metrics for titles that publish on a regular basis, such as journals and other serial publications. The CiteScore was developed as another tool for analyzing the importance of journals, similar to the Journal Impact Factor originally developed by the Institute for Scientific Information and now available in Journal Citation Reports (JCR) through the Web of Science database.

The Cite Score is calculated by dividing number of citations received in a calendar year by all items published in the journal in the preceding three years. This is similar to how the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is calculated, with a few major differences: 1.The JIF is calculated by measuring the preceding 2 years, as compared with 3 years for the CiteScore 2. CiteScore is less selective about how it determines citable items, and will include records with potential for citations (including letters to editor, news pieces) whereas the JIF only includes records that are most likely to draw citations, such as research papers 3. Access to CiteScore is freely available, whereas JCR requires a subscription. See a detailed FAQ page or more information.

In order to try out this new tool, select the Sources tab upon access of Scopus, as pictured below. If there are questions about this or other Hardin Library resources, please contact our reference desk or follow up with the appropriate subject librarian.

Posted in Uncategorized

East India Company – Trial ends 22 February 2017

East India Company offers access to a collection of India Office Records from the British Library, London. Containing royal charters, correspondence, trading diaries, minutes of council meetings and reports of expeditions, among other document types, this resource charts the history of British trade and rule in the Indian subcontinent and beyond from 1600 to 1947.

Please send additional comments to Greg Prickman.

Posted in Uncategorized

January 29th is National Puzzle Day!!

Are you addicted to Sudoku? Rubik’s Cube© ? Logic puzzles?

Well, you are in luck, because —

Sunday, January 29th, 2017 is National Puzzle Day!!

 

  • Nothing is a difficult as it seems
  • Nothing is as easy as it looks
  • Puzzles always have one, several, or no solutions
(Gianni A. Sarcone in the introduction to Impossible Folding Puzzles and Other Mathematical Paradoxes)

SO many puzzles! Where does one even begin!?

How about Tic-Tac-Toe! 

How much time did you spend playing tick-tac-toe when you were a kid?  Did you realize the person who had the first go was at a disadvantage? The first player actually has to draw one connecting line longer than the opponent.  So, if you are the first to go and still win, that’s impressive! If you add more squares – say 18 – there are 153 connecting lines. Which means there are 3153 game situations – roughly equivalent to the number of particles in the universe. Searching for a winning strategy is quite impossible and sometimes referred to as “computational chaos.” I had trouble winning with just 9 squares….

Another popular grid puzzle is Sudoku. The most common version of the puzzle consists of 9 squares by 9 squares – a grid of 81 squares. The grid is divided into 9 blocks, each containing 9 squares. The rules: each of the 9 blocks must contain all the numbers 1 – 9 within the squares. Each number can only appear once in a row, column or box. The tricky part is that each vertical 9-square column or horizontal 9-square line – within the larger square – must also contain each of the numbers 1 – 9, with no repeats… Each puzzle has only one solution…

If that isn’t challenging enough, there are also circular Sudoku puzzles!

Each of the 4 rings and 8 quarter circles have the numbers 1 through 8 (unlike the square version which has 9). Of course, you can always have 3-ring puzzles, or 5 and 6 ring puzzles. Variants and puzzles can be found in Nets, Puzzles, and Postmen.

How many of us have tried to solve the Rubik’s Cube© ?

The classic Rubik’s Cube© consists  of 26 cubelets on 3 levels. Each level of cubelets can be twisted by 90 or 180 degrees. If you twist the layers independently the cube can be brought into approximately 43 million, trillion possible states of the cube (yes, really 43 million trillion!) … The goal? Make each side of nine cubelets the same color. Tomas Rokicki, a Stanford trained mathematician, ran a program on the supercomputer at Sony Pictures Imageworks. The computing time required the equivalent of 50 years of computing – and with solving more than 25 million billion configurations none were recorded that required fewer than 22 moves. Are you able to do it in 22 moves? Are you able to do it in fewer than 22 moves?

 

Ready for the grown-up version of the baby donut stacker?

The Tower of Hanoi is a much more complicated form of the donut stacker. It was invented by the French mathematician, Edouard Lucas, and was first sold as a toy in 1883. The goal is to transfer the tower of 8 disks to one of the 2 vacant pegs in the fewest moves possible…without putting a larger disk on a smaller one…. For 8 disks that will take 255 moves… If you haven’t figured it out for yourself, the complete mathematical formulas are on pages 196-200 in Famous Puzzles of Great Mathematicians.

 

 

Logic puzzles more your style? Try to solve these – good luck!!

  • Wine & Water:
    • A dishonest servant takes 3 pints of wine from a barrel and replaces those pints with the same amount of water. He repeats his theft twice, removing a total of 9 pints, replacing those pints with water. As a result, the diluted wine remaining in the barrel lost half of its former strength. How much wine did the barrel originally hold?
  • Animals in a field:
    • A cow, a goat, and a goose graze on grass in a field. The cow eats the same quantity of grass as the goat and the goose together. the cow and the goat eat all of the grass in the field in 45 days, the cow and the goose in 60 days, and the goat and the goose in 90 days. How many days will it take the cow, the goat, and the goose together to eat all of the grass, assuming that the grass grows at the same daily rate?
  • Compose plane figures/Fibonacci’s numbers:
    • Make a rectangle without any gaps by using small squares whoe sides are the Fibonacci numbers 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, and 21.

(answers to these puzzles can be found in Famous Puzzles of Great Mathematicians.)

Want more logic puzzles? Origami, Eleusis, and the Soma Cube, by Martin Gardner presents (among others) a puzzle called The Monkey and the Coconuts…

Ever heard of the “pea and the sun paradox?” A solid of any size (a small pea for example), can be partitioned into a finite number of pieces and then reassembled to form another solid of any specified shape and volume, (the sun, for example). Is that even possible? Author Leonard Wapner explores this (and many more) puzzles in The Pea & the Sun : A Mathematical Paradox.

Or perhaps you would rather eat the puzzle? Try the chocolate puzzle with real chocolate bars and enjoy them once you have solved the puzzle!

 

 

 

The solution may found on page 67 of Impossible Folding Puzzles and Other Mathematical Paradoxes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources:

Smullyan, Raymond M. 2009. Satan, Cantor and infinity : mind-boggling puzzles. Mineola, NY : Dover Publications. Engineering Library QA 95 .S5 2009 

Szpior, George. 2010. A mathematical medley : fifty easy pieces on mathematics. Providence, R.I. : American Mathematical Society. Engineering Library QA93 .S973 2010

Gardner, Martin. Hexaflexagons, probability paradoxes, and the tower of Hanoi. 2008. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press. Engineering Library QA95 .G247 2008

Higgins, Peter M. Nets, puzzles, and postmen. 2007. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. Engineering Library QA95 .H54 2007

Clarke, Barry R. 2013. Mathematical puzzles & curiosities. Mineola, N.Y. : Dover Publications. Engineering Library QA95 .C53 2013

Petkovic, Miodrag S. Famous puzzles of great mathematicians.Providence, R.I. : American Mathematical Society. Engineering Library QA95 .P4358 2009 2009

Sarcone, Gianni A. 2013.  Impossible folding puzzles and other mathematical paradoxes. Mineola, New York : Dover Publications. Engineering Library QA95 .S315 2013

Gardner, Martin. 2008. Origami, Eleusis, and the Soma cube: Martin Garnder’s mathematical diversions. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press. Engineering Library AQ95 .G2975 2008

Wapner, Leonard M. 2005. The pea & the sun : a mathematical paradox.  Wellesley, MA : A.K. Peters. Engineering Library QA248 .W29 2005

Count on Sudoku. 2005. counton.org

Posted in Uncategorized

Graduate Students, Faculty & Staff: Be more efficient with PubMed | Free workshops!

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 26 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.
Our sessions this semester:
Tuesday, January 24th, 2:00pm-3:00pm (East Information Commons)
Thursday, February 9th, 10:00am-11:00am (East Information Commons)
Wednesday, March 1st, 2:00pm-3:00pm (East Information Commons)
Monday, April 3rd, 1:00pm-2:00pm (East Information Commons)

Register online for any of our open workshops!

Posted in Uncategorized

Early American Newspapers – Trial ends 25 February 2017

Early American Newspapers documents the daily life of hundreds of diverse American communities, supported different political parties and recorded both majority and minority views. This growing digital collection of early American newspapers is the most extensive resource of its kind.

NB: This trial includes University-subscribed content (Series 1, 2, 3, 6, 7) as well as trial-only content (Series 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13).

Please send additional comments to Matthew Braun.

Posted in Uncategorized

Dr. Richard Shope, Flu Research Pioneer | History of Medicine Lecture | Thursday, Jan. 26

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society invites you to a lecture by Russell Currier, Past President, American Veterinary Medical History Society.

Iowa’s Richard Edwin Shope MD: His Contributions to Influenza Research and One Medicine/Health

Thursday, January 26, 2017
5:30pm-6:30pm
2117 MERF (Medical Education and Research Facility)

Richard E. Shope, MD

Richard E. Shope MD (1901-1966) was a pioneer microbiologist who investigated a variety of human and animal diseases. Dr. Shope joined the laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute at Princeton to work with Dr. Paul Lewis, the discoverer of polio virus.

In 1928, he left tuberculosis research to investigate hog cholera where he observed his first outbreak of swine influenza. Later he isolated the virus from pigs and its co-pathogen “Haemophilus influenzae suis”, and postulated that the swine virus was related to the human 1918 pandemic virus.

Please consider donating online to the University of Iowa History of Medicine Society to sponsor events. 

 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871

Posted in Uncategorized

Library closed Monday, January 16 for Martin Luther King Jr. Day | Regular hours resume Tuesday, January 17

Poster designed by Tabitha Wiggins and IMU Marketing & Design

The Hardin Library will be closed on Monday, January 16 for the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday.

The University of Iowa celebrates with the MLK Day of service event on Monday, January 16, and celebrates human rights week with a variety of events across campus.

Poster designed by Tabitha Wiggins and IMU Marketing & Design

Poster designed by Tabitha Wiggins and IMU Marketing & Design

Posted in Uncategorized