Events Category

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Nineteenth Century Davenport as a Hotbed of Controversial Alternative Medicine Schools

The University of Iowa History of Medicine Society & the Iowa Women’s Archives invite you to:

Nineteenth Century Davenport as a Hotbed of Controversial
Alternative Medicine Schools

Featuring Greta Nettleton, University of Iowa author and historian
Thursday June 19, 2014, 5:30-6:30 PM
MERF Room 2117 (Medical Education and Research Facility across from Hardin Library)

Medical HOMS  Nettleton 6-19

Mrs. Dr. Rebecca J. Keck was a controversial, self-taught eclectic physician and the owner of Mrs. Dr. Keck’s Infirmary for All Chronic Diseases in Davenport, Iowa. Although forgotten today, she served up to 15,000 patients in her itinerant circuit. She successfully defended herself in court five times in Illinois for practicing medicine without a license from 1879 to 1900. How does her career illuminate the birth of other alternative medical theories such as Chiropractic?

View the event on Facebook

If you are a person with a disability requiring an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Donna Hirst, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences (donna-hirst@uiowa.edu), 335-9154. The UI Histort of Medicine Society website is located at http://hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/histmed.

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Archives Alive!: Teaching with WWII Correspondence

This post was originally written by Jen Wolfe, Digital Scholarship Librarian, for the UI Libraries Digital Research & Publishing Blog. It is re-posted here with minor modifications.

University of Iowa faculty, students, and staff discussed a curriculum project that combines historic documents with digital tools and methods as part of the Irving B. Weber Days local history celebration. The one-hour presentation “Archives Alive!: Teaching with WWII Correspondence” took place on Wednesday, May 7 at the Iowa City Public Library.

Iowa Women’s Archives Curator Kären Mason provided background on the IWA and its mission to chronicle the history of Iowa women, their families, and their communities by collecting personal papers, organizational records, and oral histories. IWA artifacts on display at the event included a World War II correspondence scrapbook, donated by author and radio personality Evelyn Birkby, upon which the Archives Alive! project was based.

Evelyn Birkby interviewing guests on KMA radio program, Shenandoah, Iowa, March 21, 1951

Evelyn Birkby interviewing guests on KMA radio program, Shenandoah, Iowa, March 21, 1951

Matt Gilchrist and Tom Keegan, Rhetoric faculty and co-directors of the Iowa Digital Engagement and Learning (IDEAL) initiative, spoke about using digital humanities methods to engage undergraduates through hands-on learning and technologically innovative assignments. For Archives Alive!, they developed a four-week curriculum module that required their Rhetoric students to participate in DIY History, the UI Libraries’ transcription crowdsourcing project. After transcribing, researching, and analyzing digitized correspondence from the Birkby scrapbook, students conveyed their findings in a variety of ways; this includes three-minute video screencasts uploaded to YouTube that form a collection of open-access works of original digital scholarship based on primary sources.

Panel of speakers at the "Archives Alive!" event on May 7, 2014

Archives Alive! panelists Zach Stark, Matt Gilchrist, Tom Keegan, Karen Mason, Jessica Graff, and James Burke, Iowa City Public Library, 2014. Photo by Matt Butler.

The event also featured presentations by Rhetoric students James Burke, Jessica Graff, and Zach Stark. For those who couldn’t make it in person, “Archives Alive!: Teaching with WWII Correspondence” will be archived at the Iowa City Public Library web site.

The Archives Alive! spring 2014 student works are available on the IDEAL website, and a letter from Evelyn Birkby to the students is included in the IWA Tumblr post about the project.

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An Evening of Irish Music & Mystery: Featuring Author Erin Hart & Musician Paddy O’Brien

Join us for an Evening of Irish Music and Mystery, featuring author Erin Hart and musician Paddy O’Brien. The evening will begin with traditional Irish music on the square between the Main Library and the Adler Journalism Building, followed by the author presentation and reception, and tours of the Conservation Lab and the Iowa Women’s Archives.

Hart will share how the discovery of the ninth century Fadden More Psalter inspired her latest novel. Hart worked with preservationists, conservationists, and scholars to include the book’s actual history in her story.

This event is sponsored by the University of Iowa Libraries, the UI Libraries Conservation Lab, and the Iowa Women’s Archives.

irishmusic

An Evening of Irish Music & Mystery
Featuring Author Erin Hart & Musician Paddy O’Brien
Thursday, May 1, 2014, 7:00 PM
University of Iowa Main Library
Shambaugh Auditorium

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Women in Politics 2014: Historic & Current Perspectives

women in politics

Women in Politics 2014: Historic & Current Perspectives
Friday, April 18th, 2014, 8:15 AM to 5:00 PM
Old Capitol Museum Senate Chambers

The Louise Noun – Mary Louise Smith Iowa Women’s Archives was founded by two women who understood the critical importance of women participating in politics at all levels.

Join us for a day-long symposium that will examine why women do or do not run for political office, how they govern once elected, and documentation of the history of women in politics. The symposium will wrap up with a policy discussion and action steps.

The symposium is free and open to the public, but please register here, as space is limited.

The Women in Politics symposium is presented by the Public Policy Center in partnership with the Iowa Women’s Archives.

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Tamales and Juneteenth Cakes: Race, Recipes and Citizenship

Friday, March 28th, 2014 at 4:00p.m.
Iowa Women’s Archives
3rd Floor, Main Library
University of Iowa

Speakers:
Katherine Massoth, Ph.D. candidate
Susan Stanfield, Ph.D.

Tamales and Juneteenth Cakes

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Black Hawkeyes: The History of Black Students at the University of Iowa

Drawing on collections in the Iowa Women’s Archives, curator Kären Mason will discuss the history of African American women students at the University of Iowa on Tuesday, February 25th at the Iowa Memorial Union.

If you can’t make it to the talk, check out this wonderful resource: African American Women Students at the University of Iowa, 1910-1960.

black hawkeyes

Black Hawkeyes: The History of Black Students at the University of Iowa
Featuring Dr. Kären M. Mason, Curator of Iowa Women’s Archives
Tuesday, February 25, 12:30-2 PM
Penn State Room, Iowa Memorial Union
Presented by the Society of Black Graduate and Professional Students

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Living Learning Community in IWA

newintown1

newintown2

On Tuesday of this week, the Iowa Women’s Archives held an event for the “New in Town” Living Learning Community. We asked the question, “What was it like to be a student at Iowa 100 years ago?” Each table represented a decade from the 1910’s all the way to the 2000’s, so the group of first year students got the chance to explore the history of student life at the University of Iowa. Scrapbooks and yearbooks were a big hit!

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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eras of emma: the emma goldman clinic through four decades

eras of emma:  the emma goldman clinic through four decades

Join us for a panel discussion featuring women who have been active in Iowa City’s feminist health clinic founded in 1973. The clinic had its origins in an abortion referral service started by Iowa City’s Women’s Liberation Front in 1971. The Emma Goldman Clinic for Women opened September 1, 1973 in a house at 715 North Dodge Street, just months after Roe v. Wade was decided by the United States Supreme Court. Initially focused on woman-centered health care, the Emma Goldman Clinic later expanded its mission to provide reproductive health care for men as well as women.
 
The panel will be moderated by Karen Kubby, former director of the clinic, and will include clinic founder Deborah Nye, first director Marilyn Cohen, current director Jennifer Price, and board member Jorie Slodki.
 
 
Friday, October 18, 2013
 
1:00-2:30 p.m.
 
Iowa Women’s Archives,
3rd floor, Main Library
The University of Iowa
 
  egc newsletter w Our Bodies  EGC n dodge house in snow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Left: The first home of the Clinic, at 715 N. Dodge, Iowa City.
 
Right: The cover of a 1979 newsletter put out by the Clinic. Note the speculum in the back pocket and the copy of Our Bodies Ourselves on the chest of drawers. The newsletter was later renamed Emma’s Periodical Rag.
 
Both items are from the Emma Goldman Clinic records in the Iowa Women’s Archives.
 
 

 

 

 

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John Fry: What I Learned from Publishing an Edited Manuscript, Fri, Sept 20, 10-11am

Laura and Earle Smith

Laura & Earle Smith were barely out of college in 1913 when they left Moravia, Iowa, to try their hand at homesteading near Chugwater, Wyoming.   Laura recounted their adventures years later in her memoir Almost Pioneers.

Historian John Fry (UI PhD, 2002) came across Almost Pioneers while doing dissertation research in the Iowa Women’s Archives and later edited it for publication.  The trail to getting the book published was almost as bumpy as the Wyoming roads of 1913–but not quite.  John Fry will be in town on September 19-20, 2013, to speak about the book.

A PIONEER EVENING WITH JOHN FRY

Thursday, September 19, 7:00 p.m.

Coralville Public Library

WHAT I LEARNED FROM PUBLISHING AN EDITED MANUSCRIPT

Friday, September 20, 10:00 a.m.

Iowa Women’s Archives

(3rd floor, Main Library, The University of Iowa)

Please join us!

For information, call 335-5068.

iwa_fry

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Leading the Field: Women and Sport at Iowa, Thu, Mar 28 at 4pm

Celebrate Women’s History Month with the Iowa Women’s Archives

In collaboration with the UI Council on the Status of Women, IWA will welcom Susan Birrell for a talk and Janet Schlapkohl for a dramatic reading on Thursday, March 28 starting at 4pm in the Iowa Women’s Archives (3rd floor south of the Main Library).

University of Iowa is a recognized leader in women in sport and physical education. Four years ago, the University of Iowa Libraries celebrated that legacy by digitizing a collection of the UI Department of Physical Education for Women. Below is more information about this remarkable digital collection.

Almost 1000 historic photographs of University women’s physical education classes – from archery and synchronized swimming to basketball and dance – are now publicly available online. In celebration of Women’s History Month, the University of Iowa Libraries has released the UI Department of Physical Education for Women digital collection: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/wpe .

The photographs, spanning almost 100 years (1906-2004), are part of a larger manuscript collection that documents the rise of women’s athletics at Iowa from the one-member Department of Physical Culture and Athletics to the dawn of women’s intercollegiate sports. The Department of Physical Education for Women at the University of Iowa was a pioneer in the development of graduate study and professional training as well as athletic opportunities for women.

“These photographs offer a fabulous window into women’s sport—and campus life—over the past century.  They’re very appealing, from the expected team portraits and sports action shots to the more surprising images of laboratory experiments, rifle enthusiasts, and slumber parties,” says Kären Mason, Curator of the Iowa Women’s Archives. “The digital collection provides easy access to these photos, and I hope it will inspire people to explore the equally fascinating records of the Department of PE for Women that are available in the archives.”

Intercollegiate athletics for women at The University of Iowa originated in the Department of Physical Education for Women in the late 1960s and early 1970s and maintained that association until 2000.  This relationship stemmed from the philosophy of the women physical educators and the value they placed on education and women-centered and -controlled sport.

“Those two key, related notions are still at the heart of the current Department of Health and Sport Studies: that sport and physical activity should be part of a liberal arts education and that they can contribute greatly to both individual well-being and the social good,” says Catriona Parratt, Associate Professor in the Department of Health & Sport Studies. “We are delighted that the Iowa Women’s Archives digital photographic collection will make it easier for many more people to appreciate this aspect of the University’s mission.”

This historic image collection is the latest edition to the Iowa Digital Library — http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu — which contains more than 225,000 digital objects, including photographs, maps, sound recordings and documents from libraries and archives at the UI and their partnering institutions as well as faculty research collections.

To explore the vast digital holdings from the Iowa Women’s Archives, a portal that allows users to browse by subject, time period or artifact type is available online at http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa . It will be continually updated with new items drawn from the IWA’s 1100 manuscript collections, which have provided valuable primary source materials for books, articles, theses and class projects on women’s history.

For more information about the collection, contact Kären Mason, Curator of the Iowa Women’s Archives, at 335-5068.