30th Anniversary Benefit Auction: Bill Voss

Bill VossAbout the Binding:

Red leather onlays with gold foil tooling on full green goatskin, with leather hinges and endbands tooled in red and gold.  The design is modeled on a pattern used by Bill Anthony on Hollinshed’s Irish Cronicle.

Estimated Value: $1,000

Bill Voss

About the Artist:

Bill Voss is a Conservation Techncian at the University of Iowa Libraries, where he has worked since 1999.  He has an BA in Russian from Lawrence University, a MA in Slavic Linguistics from The University of Washington and a Certificate in Book Studies from the University of Iowa’s Center for the Book.

To bid on any of the bindings, please email us at lib-prescons@uiowa.edu. Bids will be accepted until the end of the silent auction, 7 pm CST on Thursday November 13th.

30th Anniversary Benefit Auction: Shanna Leino

Shanna LeinoAbout the Tools:

While working on books, I found myself needing simple but special tools to carry out the work on leather, wood, and bone. That set me on the road to making folders, awls, punches, and hooks. It is satisfying to me to see others making skillful use of the tools I have made.

Tool making itself satisfies a need I have to keep my hands moving. I like the focus it provides.

Make beautiful work with good tools!

Hand-Built Tools by Shanna Leino
- Leather tool roll
- 2 leather polka dot paper weights
- Elk bone awl –for blind tooling leather
- Double ended steel awl – for marking, scribing, hole punching
- Elk bone folder – for general folding and burnishing
- Old stock Japanese snips – etched and dipped by Shanna
- Fine elk bone folder – for tighter, delicate work
- Steel micro-chisel – for punching and chiseling wood, board, and paper
- Elk bone and steel pin awl – for piercing paper
- Kelm stainless steel folder – for heavy duty scoring

Steel Tools: The steel tools are made from high carbon steel and have been heat treated for strength and durability. The steel tools are patterned by hammer blows or embellished with hand-cut steel stamps.

Carved Elk Bone Tools: The shape, size, and feel of the bone tools are in part determined by the bone it comes from. Each is unique. All of the folders I make are from elk bone, an exceptionally dense, white bone that carves wonderfully and polishes well. I receive clean, whole leg bones (an otherwise unused by-product of hunting) and spend a lot of time working it to shape with a band saw, sander and numerous hand tools. The shaped bone is then ornamented with hand carving, either a pattern made up with lines and dots, or carved flower. Hand sanding and buffing polish and complete the tools.

Estimated Value: $425

Shanna Leino

About the Artist:

Shanna grew up in Harrisville, New Hampshire. She returned after completing her BFA at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and spending a number of invaluable years of learning with the good book people in Iowa City, Iowa.

She continues to travel in search of conferences, seminars, and teaching opportunities to continue/enrich her own learning.

To bid on any of the bindings, please email us at lib-prescons@uiowa.edu. Bids will be accepted until the end of the silent auction, 7 pm CST on Thursday November 13th.

Database of the Week: Web of Science

Each week we will highlight one of the many databases we have here at the Pomerantz Business Library.

The database: Web of Science

Where to find it: You can find it here, and under W in the databases A-Z list. WebOfScience

Use it to find:

  • Articles from over 12,000 different journals in the fields of: science, technology, social sciences, arts and humanities
  • Citation tracking information
  • Coverage from 1900 – present
  • Full-text using the InfoLink button

Article

Tips for searching:

  • Use the quick search bar or do an Advanced Search
  • Use drop down menu to search by: Topic, Title, Author, Editor, Publication, Year, Document type, etc.
  • Use the left-hand bar to refine your searchWebOfScience2

Demos: Check out the following demo:

Want help using Web of Science? Contact Willow or Kim and set up an appointment.

Appeals Court Rules on Georgia State’s E-Reserves Case: Back to Lower Court

Last week a federal appeals court reversed the a judge’s decision from May 2012 that ruled in favor of Georgia State University, whose library wanted to be able to make freely available as much copyrighted material as possible via electronic reserves. This is actually not bad news for libraries, as attested to by several copyright experts.  Kevin Smith, scholarly communications officer at Duke, points out in a recent blog post:

  • The court agreed that potential copyright violations should be addressed on an “item by item” basis, which allows universities to make individualized fair use decisions.
  • The court agreed that when evaluating whether e-reserve copying counts as fair use, it should be relevant that university libraries are nonprofit, educational institutions and are not making money off of course reserves.
  • The court rejected the lower court’s 10% or one chapter rule.  The appellate judges instead advocated for “a more flexible approach that takes into account the amount appropriate for the pedagogical purpose.”
  • The court agreed that if a publisher had not made it possible for libraries to license excerpts of a copyrighted work, then libraries do not harm the market for the publisher’s products by copying the desired excerpts and making them freely available.

Smith concludes that the publishers in the case have lost big for what were fighting for, that is to “radically change the landscape.”

Read more:

Ga. State’s Loss in ‘E-Reserves’ Case Might Actually Be a Win for Librarians, Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 20, 2014

Nancy Sims, of University of Minnesota, has an astute analysis of the case.

There is a thorough and smart analysis of the ruling from Nancy Sims of the University of Minnesota found here. – See more at: http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/#sthash.IEno3aYH.dpuf
There is a thorough and smart analysis of the ruling from Nancy Sims of the University of Minnesota found here. – See more at: http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/#sthash.IEno3aYH.dpuf
There is a thorough and smart analysis of the ruling from Nancy Sims of the University of Minnesota found here. – See more at: http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/#sthash.IEno3aYH.dpuf

Ghosts in the Stacks (and free popcorn)!

Looking for a spooky way to start off your Halloween weekend?  Craving some free, freshly popped popcorn?  Stop by the Main Library Learning Commons for a look at some of the scariest items housed in the Special Collections and University Archives department.

With items ranging from truly disturbing illustrations, to stories of local hauntings, there’s something to startle everyone.  Special Collections and University Archives will have a selection of items available for browsing to help you get your Halloween weekend off to a historic start.

Thursday, October 30, 12pm-4pm
Main Library Learning Commons, Group Area D (across from Food for Thought)

For a preview of some of our spooky items, check out our tumblr page!

Database of the Week: World Bank eLibrary

Each week we will highlight one of the many databases we have here at the Pomerantz Business Library.

The database: World Bank eLibrary   WorldBank

Where to find it: You can find it here, and under W in the databases A-Z list.

Use it to find:

  • Information on global issues including development policy, finance, health, education, climate change, aid effectiveness, and poverty
  • World Bank flagship and annual publications
  • Data publications
  • Regional and thematic series
  • Training manuals and handbooks
  • Working papers
  • Journal articles

Chapter

Tips for searching:

  • Use the quick search bar or do an Advanced Search
  • Filter using the right-hand options
  • Filter by: content type, topic, region, country, keyword, author, publication date, journal

Demos: Check out the following demo:

eLibrary_Video

Want help using World Bank eLibrary? Contact Willow or Kim and set up an appointment.

Louise Liers, World War I nurse

This post, by Christina Jensen, appeared on the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr this summer, and has since been featured on NBC news.

On June 28th, 1914, Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo by Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip. One month later, war broke out across Europe between two alliance systems. Britain, France, Russia, and Italy comprised the Allied powers. Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire constituted the Central powers. As war raged abroad, the U.S. wrestled with the politics of neutrality and intervention. In April of 1917, President Wilson was granted a declaration of war by Congress. The United States thus officially entered the conflict alongside Allied forces. 

To mark the occasion of the World War I centennial, we’re remembering Iowa women whose lives were shaped by the war.

One such woman was Clayton-native Louise Marie Liers (1887-1983), an obstetrics nurse who enrolled in the Red Cross and served in France as an Army nurse.

Before her deployment, however, Liers was required by the American Red Cross to submit three letters “vouching for her loyalty as an American citizen.” All nurses, regardless of nationality, were similarly required to provide three non-familial references testifying to this effect. While questions of loyalty and subversion are exacerbated in any war, America’s domestic front was rife with tension driven by geography, class, and ethnicity that raised fears and stoked national debate in the years leading up to America’s engagement in the Great War.

Louise Liers's war identification. Louise Liers Papers, Iowa Women's Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

Louise Liers’s war identification. Louise Liers Papers, Iowa Women’s Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

Arriving in 1918, Liers was stationed in the French town of Nevers where she treated wounded soldiers.  During this time Liers wrote numerous letters home to her parents and brother describing her duties and conditions of life during the war.

In a letter to her brother, featured below, Liers described her journey to France from New York City, with stops in Liverpool and Southampton.

Louise Liers’s letter to her brother, describing her journey from Iowa to Base Hospital No. 14 in France. Louise Liers papers, Iowa Women's Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

Louise Liers’s letter to her brother, describing her journey from Iowa to Base Hospital No. 14 in France. Louise Liers papers, Iowa Women’s Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

When Liers arrived in 1918, Nevers was only a few hours away from the Allied offensive line of the Western Front.  She was assigned to a camp that served patients with serious injuries and those who required long-term care.  Liers noted in a 1970 interview that, by the end of the war, as fewer patients with battle wounds arrived, her camp began to see patients with the “Asian flu,” also known as the 1918 influenza outbreak that infected 500 million people across the world by the end of the war.

In letters home, and in interviews given later, Liers described pleasant memories from her time in service, including pooling sugar rations with fellow nurses to make fudge for patients.  Nurses could apply for passes to leave camp and Liers was thus able to visit both Paris and Cannes.  In an interview Liers recalled that, serendipitously, she had requested in advance a leave-pass to travel into town for the 11th of November, 1918. To her surprise, that date turned out to be Armistice Day, and she was able to celebrate the end of the war with the citizens of Nevers.

“…devised such tortures and called it warfare…”

Along with her cheerier memories, however, Liers’s papers also describe the difficulties of caregiving during war.  She described Nevers as a town “stripped of younger people” due to the great number of deaths accrued in the four years of war.  In later interviews Liers offered many accounts of the grim surroundings medical staff worked under, from cramped and poorly equipped conditions, to unhygienic supplies, such as bandages washed by locals in nearby rivers, which she remembered as “utterly ridiculous from a sanitary standpoint…they were these awful dressings. They weren’t even sterilized, there wasn’t time.”  Due to the harsh conditions and limited resources, nurses and doctors gained practical knowledge in the field. Liers recalled frustrating battles to treat maggot-infected wounds before the nurses realized that the maggots, in fact, were sometimes the best option to keep wounds clean from infection in a field hospital.

On a grimmer note, Liers wrote to her parents the following:

“As I have told you before, the boys are wonderful- very helpful. When I see their horrible wounds or worse still their mustard gas burns or the gassed patients who will never again be able to do a whole days work- I lose every spark of sympathy for the beast who devised such tortures and called it warfare- last we were in Moulins when a train of children from the devastated districts came down-burned and gassed- and that was the most pitiful sight of all.”

By the time the “final drive” was in motion, Base Hospital No. 14 was filled with patients to nearly double capacity, and doctors and nurses had to work by candlelight or single light bulb. Liers’ wartime service and reflections suggest a range of emotions and experiences had by women thrust into a brutal war, remembered for its different methods of warfare, inventive machinery, and attacks on civilian populations.

Army nurses on parade, c. 1918. Louise Liers papers, Iowa Women's Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

Army nurses on parade, c. 1918. Louise Liers papers, Iowa Women’s Archives, The University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City.

Liers worked in France until 1920, and her correspondence with friends and family marks the change in routine brought on by the end of the war.  With more freedom to travel, Liers and friends toured throughout France, and like countless visitors before and after, Liers describes how enchanted she became with the country, from the excitement of Paris to the rural beauty of Provence.

Following the war, Liers returned to private practice in Chicago, and later Elkader, where she was regarded as a local institution unto herself, attending over 7,000 births by 1949.  She was beloved by her local community, which gifted her a new car in 1950 as a sign of gratitude upon her retirement.

 

Want more? Visit the Iowa Women’s Archives! We’re open weekly Tuesday-Friday, 10:00am to noon and 1:00pm to 5:00pm.

A list of collections related to Iowa women and war can be found here.

Make the jump from RefWorks to EndNote with Hardin Library open workshops

As the University of Iowa moves to EndNote as its official citation management solution, we at Hardin are here to help with the transition from RefWorks (or any other tool). At this quick workshop, you will learn how to collect your citations and bibliographic data and then import it into EndNote.

Our sessions this semester:

Tuesday, October 21, 12:00-12:30pm

Tuesday, November 4, 9-9:30am

Wednesday, November 12, 2:30-3pm

Thursday, November 20, 10:30-11am

Tuesday, December 9, 9:30-10am

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/.

Just need a little help?  See our EndNote guide:  http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/citingsources/HardinEndNoteDesktop .

Database of the Week: Business Monitor Online

Each week we will highlight one of the many databases we have here at the Pomerantz Business Library.

The database: Business Monitor  BusinessMonitor

Where to find it: You can find it here, and under B in the databases A-Z list.

Use it to find Country and Region specific:

  • Economic, Political Risk, &  Industry Trend Analyses
  • Industry News
  • Company Briefs
  • Industry Reports
  • Risk Ratings
  • Political Outlooks
  • SWOTs
  • Economic Outlooks & Forecasts
  • Business Environment Outlooks
  • Data & Forecasting Tools

BMI

Tips for searching:

  • Select a “Geography” or “Service” at the top
  • Use the tabs: “Daily Views”, “Reports & Strategic Content” and “Data & forecasting” to navigate
  • Use the left hand bar to further refine your search

Demos: The following demos can be viewed on YouTube:

 

Want help using Business Monitor? Contact Willow or Kim and set up an appointment.

Curriculum-Based Library Instruction Book edited by Amy Blevins published

picture of book cover Amy Blevins, Clinical Education Library at Hardin Library for the Health Sciences and adjunct faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine edited  Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment.  The book is part of the Medical Librarian Association Book Series published by Rowman and Littlefield.

Chapters were also written by University of Iowa Libraries librarians Dan Gall, Jennifer DeBerg, and Kim Bloedel.