Learn PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics @Hardin Library Tuesday 9/2

picture of Amy Blevins

Librarian Instructor Amy Blevins

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences.  This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session is:
September 2, 1:00-2:00pm, Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register for this or any of our workshops online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ or by calling 319-335-9151.  You may also request a personal session online.

 

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Yours of date 11 Aug. has just reached me, and it has lifted a load of anxiety from my mind

Joseph Culver Letter, August 22, 1864, Page 1Hd. Quarters Battery “M” Ist Ill. Artillery.
Near Atlanta Ga. 22 Aug. 1864.
Dear Sister Mollie:

Yours of date 11 Aug. has just reached me, and it has lifted a load of anxiety from my mind. Untill today I have not heard a word from Sammy since the 26th of last month. He may have written to me. Our mail of late, has been troubled considerably by the rebel cavalry, and I hope all the letters that have been mailed to me have not reached me – or more plainly speaking, I hope that more letters have been mailed me, than I have yet received. I had a letter today from William S. Murphy. It is quite an affectionate and patriotic missive. He did not say anything about his father’s family. I know but little of them. How are they doing? Your letter is full of news and gratifies me more than it would to “go home and get married.” I do not write to the “girls” any more. You see I am out of note paper, have nothing but this large foolscap – and do not expect to have anything better for one or two years to come – and of course I would not shock their propriety by sending them a letter written on this vulgar sort of paper.

I think it is no pleasure to Jennie Guthrie to have you speak of me to her, therefore I would recommend that you avoid it in future. We used to correspond, but we don’t now. I don’t think I ever saw Robert Kelly, and yet the name sounds wonderfully familiar. Success to him in all his matrimonial enterprises. I guess I had better say something like that and let it go, hadn’t I? or shall I get a leave of absence and go home and call him out. There would be a taste of romance in this latter course! and I think it would please the girls beyond measure, to have us poor deluded swains shootings one an other’s heads off for their sakes. Yes, it wood please them too well – guess I shant do it. And it would detract from the dignity of us ‘Lords of Creation to fight about women. How does Jennie look now? What sort of a girl is she? I do not know her. As much as I have seen her and as much as I have been in her company, I am not well acquainted with her. I was not aware that Thomas did not take a share that boat, as he contemplated doing. I have not heard from him in some time – in a long time. I will write to him and see how he is getting along. I have not seen Frank for three weeks, but heard from him a few days ago. He was well.

With love, Mollie, Goodbye. Write me often.

Affectionately Johnie.
Lieut Battery “M” 1st Ill. Artillery
4 Army Corps Dept. Cumberland

Online Videos of Engineering Failures Now Available!

The Lichtenberger Engineering Library has a new database for steaming videos!

Engineering case study online - Kari's Edits

 

This database is called Engineering Case Studies Online (http://purl.lib.uiowa.edu/EnginCaseStud)

Engineering Case Studies Online is a multi-media database chronicling the field’s most noteworthy failures, such as the Chernobyl Disaster, Ford Pinto Controversy, Apollo 13 and more. Designed to meet classroom and research needs across a range of engineering disciplines—such as aerospace, mechanical, nuclear, and civil—the collection brings together nuanced information about complex case studies into one database. It aims to incorporate diverse perspectives and materials, presented in a balanced way, to enable through analysis. Pulling together 250 hours of video and 50,000 pages of full-text material upon completion, the collected materials include video documentaries and primary footage, audio transcripts and witness testimony; images, maps, accident reports, blueprints, and other key archival content, monographs and articles, as well as timelines and simulations.

Emma’s founding mothers visit the Archives

This post was written by Jessica Lawson, Graduate Research Assistant in the Iowa Women’s Archives.

 

(Clockwise from left) Sondra Smith, Barb Yates, Dale McCormick, Gayle Sand, and Francie Hornstein.

(Clockwise from left) Sondra Smith, Barb Yates, Dale McCormick, Gayle Sand, and Francie Hornstein.

 

The Iowa Women’s Archives had an exciting visit at the end of July! Five founding members of Iowa City’s Emma Goldman Clinic—Dale McCormick, Sondra Smith, Gayle Sand, Barb Yates, and Francie Hornstein—reunited to look through this feminist health clinic’s records and share memories of its early days. The Emma Goldman Clinic (fondly known as “Emma”) is a not-for-profit healthcare and family planning provider whose records are housed at the Archives.

 

Barb Yates, Francie Hornstein, and Dale McCormick looking at Ain't I a Woman, published by the Women's Liberation Front in Iowa City in the early 1970s.

Barb Yates, Francie Hornstein, and Dale McCormick looking at Ain’t I a Woman, published by the Women’s Liberation Front in Iowa City in the early 1970s.

 

The collections we brought out for the founders’ visit, as well as the stories they shared, reflect the rich interconnections among women’s organizations and social justice movements in Iowa City in the 1970s. In addition to the material in the Emma Goldman Clinic Records themselves, the history of the clinic is woven through the personal papers of two of the visitors (Dale McCormick and Sondra Smith), as well as other local activists like Jill Jack and Linda Yanney and organizations such as the Women’s Resource and Action Center (WRAC). The women laughed as they told stories about staging a feminist revision of Taming of the Shrew, proudly compared their work on Ain’t I a Woman (the newsletter of the Iowa City Women’s Liberation Front) to the work of women’s groups in New York City in the 1970s, and paused to celebrate the memory of Iowa Women’s Archives co-founder Louise Noun. They even found time to help us identify some of the faces in the old photographs.

Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room – Jean Pecquet

picture of dissection

from JEAN PECQUET (1622-1674). Experimenta nova anatomica, quibus incognitum hactenus chyli receptaculum, & ab eo per thoracem in ramos usque subclavios vasa lactea deteguntur. Paris: Apud Sebastianum Cramoisy et Gabrielem Cramoisy, 1651.

At the beginning of the 17th century, it was widely believed that food was converted into blood as it passed through the digestive system. The blood was then carried to the liver where it was imbued with natural spirits and passed on to the heart for distribution through the body. Since only the blood vessels were known to the anatomists of that day, it was thought that chyle, the product of digestion, was transported to the liver by the venous system of the intestines.

This notion was corrected by Gaspare Aselli in 1627 when, by accident, he discovered the lacteal vessels in the mesentery of a dog. He incorrectly surmised that the lacteal vessels empty their contents into the liver. It was not until 1651 that Pecquet reported his discovery of the receptaculum chyli and thoracic duct. He accurately described the lacteal veins of Aselli and showed that they terminate in the receptaculum chyli and that the thoracic duct joins the venous systems at the junction of the jugular and subclavian veins.

Joannes van Horne made the same discovery quite independently and corroborated Pecquet’s findings. Later Pecquet’s work was confirmed and extended to cover the entire lymphatic system by Olof Rudbeck (1630-1702) and Thomas Bartholin. The copperplate engraving clearly depicts the main lymphatic system both in a separate figure and in the dissected abdomen and thorax of a dog.

 

 

 

Searching Nutrition in PubMed is Difficult – Hardin Class will teach you HOW – Thursday, July 24

Nutrition is a trending subject that’s important in many areas of the health sciences. Nutrition is one of the most difficult subjects to search in PubMed, because relevant aspects of the subject are scattered among multiple  subject terms.

We’re offering a class to help you optimize your searches for nutrition, diet and food in PubMed. The class is appropriate for all health sciences specialties.  It will be taught by Janna Lawrence and Eric Rumsey, both of whom are experienced in searching nutrition and other subjects in PubMed.

Time: Thursday, July 24, 10:30-11:30 AM

Location: Hardin Library  EAST Information Commons Classroom, 2nd floor

Register online:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/workshop/ 

Questions? Contact us by calling (319) 335-9151 or email us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu.

As background for the class, or if you’re not able to attend, we have written several blog articles on nutrition searching in PubMed. This one will get you started, and lead to our other articles:

Searching for Food, Diet & Nutrition in PubMed

 

The Treasure in the Old Will: Iowa Women’s Archives Inherits Valuable Nancy Drew Collection

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There were no missing documents, phony relatives, or suspicious fires — just a straightforward bequest from Peggy Wirt, whose mother, the late Mildred Wirt Benson, was the original ghostwriter of the Nancy Drew series. But the collection that was recently left to the Iowa Women’s Archives calls to mind another mystery trope – the hidden treasure: the gift of 150 books, written and signed by Benson, was appraised at $115,000. According to IWA Curator Kären Mason, however, the true value of the donation lies in further documenting an important figure in American popular culture.

The first student to earn a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Iowa, Mildred Wirt Benson wrote the original Nancy Drew novel, The Secret of the Old Clock, in 1930 under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. She completed nearly two dozen more titles in what has become one of the most successful children’s book series ever. Benson published numerous other children’s novels, both as a ghostwriter and under her own name, before turning to a career in journalism. The Peggy Wirt bequest will be added to the IWA’s Mildred Wirt Benson collection, used frequently by scholars and fans alike, that was donated by the author in 1992 and subsequent years until her death in 2002.

Two additional sets of new acquisitions complement the book donation. Purchased at auction from the estate of Peggy Wirt are a vintage typewriter of Benson’s, along with several photo albums. The latter include the original snapshot of an image that has become iconic to fans of the author: a college-age Benson, circa 1925, making a daring swan dive into the Iowa River near the current site of the UI’s student union.

The other recent donation comes from UI Journalism Professor Emerita Carolyn Stewart Dyer, who gave the IWA her collection of foreign-language Nancy Drew novels. The covers of these French, Japanese, and Swedish translations depict a Nancy both familiar and strange – renamed Kitty or Alice, holding a gun, her trademark titian hair changed to brown or blonde.

In any language, the character continues to serve as a feminist icon who inspires women “to persevere, to achieve, to ask questions and find answers,” according to Dyer. While coordinating the UI’s 1993 symposium on Nancy Drew, she heard from many women who grew up on the series:

Most compelling of the many elements of the stories women told us about reading Nancy Drew were the accounts of how, as girls, they saw in Nancy an alternative to conventional notions of what a woman could be. Women in many occupations told of learning from Nancy to see adventure in solving problems and the joy of self-reliance. These qualities, they said, led them to the futures they chose as lawyers, researchers, librarians, and detectives, among other roles. (1)

The Mildred Wirt Benson materials may be viewed at the Iowa Women’s Archives. Selections from the collection have been digitized and made available at the Iowa Digital Library: digital.lib.uiowa.edu/mwb

  1. “The Nancy Drew Phenomenon: Rediscovering Nancy Drew in Iowa” by Carolyn Stewart Dyer, in Rediscovering Nancy Drew, edited by Carolyn Stewart Dyer and Nancy Tillman Romalov (University of Iowa Press, 1995)

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From top: the bequest of novels from Peggy Wirt, waiting to be processed; a vintage typewriter used by Benson; Benson’s photo albums; foreign-language versions of Nancy Drew novels, donated by Carolyn Stewart Dyer. Photographs by Hannah Scates Kettler

Art Library materials usage during flood.

As a result of the closing of Art Building West (ABW), the staff of the Art Library have made arrangements to provide resources for art faculty and students.

  • Art Library books checked out by UI graduate students and faculty will be automatically renewed.
  • Materials on Reserve will be placed at Main Library Reserve.
  • Materials currently on hold at the Art Library will be at the Service Desk in the Main Library.
  • Materials may be returned to the Main Library.

 

Please use Interlibrary Loan for all needed materials (library staff will not have access to ABW).

Please contact the Art Library staff (lib-art@uiowa.edu) or Main Library Circulation staff (lib-maincirc@uiowa.edu) with any questions.

Art Library CLOSED

With the closure of Art Building West (ABW) due to possible flooding, the Art Library will be closing at 3:00 p.m. on July 2 until further notice.

  • Materials on Reserve will be placed at Main Library Reserve.
  • Materials currently on hold at the Art Library will be at the Service Desk in the Main Library.
  • Materials may be returned to the Main Library.
  • Please use Interlibrary Loan for all needed materials (library staff will not have access to ABW).