Welcome Back Students – Spring semester hours

image by wokandapix @pixabay
image by wokandapix @pixabay

image by wokandapix @pixabay

The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences is now open until Midnight Sunday-Thursday.
A 24-hour study is available when the library is closed.  If you would like access to the 24-hour study, please apply for access at the 3rd floor service desk.

Complete hours available online.

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Use libraries One Button Studio to record what social justice means to you | Just Living Theme Semester

Just Living, the University of Iowa’s Spring 2016 Theme Semester on social justice, will explore values, beliefs, and positioning by examining our past and looking to our future.  Main and Hardin Libraries are partnering with the Just Living theme semester committee on a video project using the library One Button Studios.   Throughout the spring semester students, faculty, staff and community members can use the One Button Studio to record themselves speaking about what social justice means to them.

Prompts for your video:

  • What does social justice mean to you?
  • How are you Just Living?
  • Why do you need social justice?

At the end of each month, videos created will be combined and displayed on the Just Living website. 

Hardin Library will have a table staffed with someone from the Writing Center and someone from the Speech Center, someone to assist using the studio, and free popcorn on Friday, January 22, from 11am-1pm.

Future  events include:

  • ​Tuesday, February 22nd from 4-6pm at the Main Library
  • Thursday, March 10th from 11am-1pm at the Main Library
  • Wednesday, April 20th from 4-6pm at Hardin Library

Hardin Library’s One Button Studio is open whenever the Hardin Library is open.  You can reserve studio time online.

January 2016 Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @ Hardin Library | Charles Estienne (1504-1564)

Charles Estienne (1504-1564). De dissectione partium corporis humani libri tres. : Apud Simonem Colinaeum, 1545.

Charles Estienne

Charles Estienne

Estienne was a member of the famous Estienne family of printers. He received his medical degree from the University of Paris in 1542, but had been at work on this anatomical magnum opus for many years, as some of the plates are dated 1530 and 1531.

This magnificent folio (oversized) volume is one of the finest of all anatomical treatises. Certainly it was the finest printed in France in the 16th Century. The 62 full-page woodcuts, artistically present the anatomical subjects in special poses before unusual background settings. The anatomy itself is pre-Vesalian in conception and far from being as accurate as Vesalius. Some of the plates show diseased as well as normal anatomy.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.  Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.

Some additional images from this work available online from the National Library of Medicine.

Artist: Étienne de La Rivière,  Engraver:  Jean Jollat,"Mercure," fl.

Artist: Étienne de La Rivière, Engraver: Jean Jollat,”Mercure,” fl.

 

Hardin Library closed Monday, January 18 for MLK Holiday | Longer hours begin Tuesday, January 19

The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences Library will be closed Monday, January 18 for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.  The library will re-open at 7:30 on Tuesday, January 19.  Spring semester hours begin January 19.

Schedule of University of Iowa events for Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Week 2016

Iowa City Community events for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

image of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Hardin Library open until Midnight Friday, Dec. 11 and Saturday, Dec. 12

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences can help you with your finals problems.

Are you worried you need more time to study before finals actually begin? We are open late Friday and Saturday to help you get ready.

Do you like unlimited free coffee?  We are giving away free coffee for 117 hours this year, starting at 8am Friday

Do you want to study in a quiet environment with other serious students?  

Need to reserve a group study room?  

Need expert research help? Hardin Library reference desk is staffed with , Librarians, and fully-trained permanent staff, and  Library and Information Science every hour the library is open.

Got a question you think is dumb?  We are always happy to help, and you can chat with us  anonymously if you wish.

Need to take a stress break?  Therapy dogs will be in Room 401 HLHS on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 2-4pm.  Coloring pages will be available on 3rd floor.  Puzzles will be available to work on.

How can I get there?  Take a Pentacrest Cambus to the VA Loop stop.  We are just up the hill.

 

 

 

 

 

Get ready for finals @Hardin Library

The Hardin Library will be open until Midnight on Friday, December 11 and Saturday, December 12.  Get ready for finals or take a break.

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How do I get there? Take Pentacrest Cambus to the VA Loop–the library is just up the hill.

December Notes from the John Martin Rare Book Room @Hardin Library | Jacopo Berengario Da Carpi

Jacopo Berengario Da Carpi

Jacopo Berengario Da Carpi

JACOPO BERENGARIO DA CARPI (1470-1530). Isagoge breves, perlucide ac uberime, in anatomia humani corporis. [Bologna: Impressum per Benedictum Hectoris, 1522].

Berengario was a serious student of Mondino and followed him in all matters pertaining to anatomy.  He wrote Commentaria on Mondino’s Anothomia in 1521, and corrected many of Mondino’s shortcomings and added in his own observations.  He wrote his own anatomical compendium in 1522.

Berengario’s illustrations lack detail, but his woodcuts are believed to be the first to be taken directly from human dissections.  The full-length figures are shown in action poses.  His muscle figures and skeletons are drawn against landscape backgrounds in the same fashion used later by Estienne and Vesalius.

Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings received limited circulation, but the influence of da Vinci’s artistic techniques is evident in a number of Berengario’s woodcuts.  This rare book is an important example of anatomical illustration in the pre-Vesalian period.

You may view this book in the John Martin Rare Book Room, Hardin Library for the Health Sciences.  Illustrations from 1523 edition available online from the National Library of Medicine.  Make a gift to the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences by donating online or setting up a recurring gift with The University of Iowa Foundation.