About Author: Sara Scheib

Posts by Sara Scheib

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Public access to NASA-funded research

NASA made an exciting announcement this week. It’s launching a new research portal to provide free public access to the data and publications resulting from NASA-funded research. The portal points to two new services.

The first, called “NASA’s Data Portal” is a catalog of publicly available datasets, APIs, and visualizations. You can use it to explore by category, or search to find a specific dataset.

The second service, called “PubSpace“, will provide free public access to peer-reviewed journal articles and other publications resulting from NASA-funded research. It is an extension of PubMed Central (PMC), which is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and operated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). PubSpace will be fully functional in Fall 2016.

If you have question or would like to learn more about accessing federally-funded research data or publications, please contact the Sciences Library.

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Coming soon: ChemRxiv

The American Chemical Society has announced it plans to launch a preprint server for chemistry, called ChemRxiv. The launch date for the service has yet to be released.

From American Chemical Society News Releases, August 10, 2016:

“The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced its intention to form ChemRxiv, a chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, proposed as a collaborative undertaking that will facilitate the open dissemination of important scientific findings. The Society is presently in the process of inviting interested stakeholders to participate in helping to shape the service ahead of its anticipated launch.”

“”ChemRxiv is expected to follow the established models of arXiv in physics and bioRxiv in the life sciences by enabling researchers working across diverse areas of inquiry to share early results and data with their scientist-colleagues ahead of formal peer review and publication,” says Kevin Davies, Ph.D., who, as Vice President within the ACS Publications Division, will be spearheading the effort as part of a joint undertaking with the Society’s Chemical Abstracts Service.”

And more information from Nature: Chemists to get their own preprint server

This is an exciting announcement with the potential to change scholarly publishing in the chemistry community. The Sciences Library will provide more information about this new resource as it becomes available. Stay tuned!

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Lego Exhibit

It’s the summer of super heroes at the Sciences Library! Come check out our Lego exhibit, featuring Marvel Superheroes, DC Comics Superheroes, and Star Wars sets. Many thanks to the Scheib family for sharing their collection with us.

First floor display case with superhero Legos

third floor display case with Star Wars Legos

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Exhibit: 350th Anniversary of Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation

Newton ExhibitThe new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Isaac Newton and the 350th anniversary of his Universal Law of Gravitation, presented for the first time in 1666.

We’ve all heard the story about Newton and the apple, but how did Newton really come to understand gravity? Our exhibit describes Newton’s life and work, with an emphasis on the Universal Law of Gravitation and its evolution over time. Many thanks to the Department of Physics & Astronomy for loaning us several items for the exhibit, including an antique refracting telescope and a prism like the one used in Newton’s famous light refraction experiments.

To learn more about Newton and his Universal Law of Gravitation, ask a librarian or check out these excellent resources:

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Exhibit: Einstein and the General Theory of Relativity

Pic for blogOur new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Albert Einstein and the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity, presented for the first time in 1915.

The exhibit explains the general theory of relativity and its significance to modern physics. It also provides some interesting background information about his life and family.

To learn more about the general theory of relativity, ask a librarian or check out these cool websites:

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Finals Week at the Sciences Library

10 Reasons to Spend Finals Week at the Sciences Library:

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Holiday hours at the Sciences Library

The Sciences Library will deviate from its normal schedule during the holiday season:

Thanksgiving Recess:

  • Sat., Nov. 21 – Sun., Nov. 22: CLOSED
  • Mon., Nov. 23 – Wed., Nov. 25: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thu., Nov. 26 – Sun., Nov. 29: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Mon., Nov. 30th.

Winter Break:

  • Sat., Dec. 19 – Sun., Dec. 27: CLOSED
  • Mon., Dec. 28 – Thu., Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri., Jan. 1 – Sun., Jan. 3: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 4 – Fri., Jan. 8: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 9 – Sun., Jan. 10: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 11 – Fri., Jan. 15: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 16 – Mon., Jan. 18: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Tues. Jan. 19th.

View all our hours and upcoming events on our calendar. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.

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Exhibit: The Science of Frankenstein

We’ve installed a new exhibit at the Sciences Library, just in time for Halloween!

The Science of Frankenstein explores the scientific practices that inspired Mary Shelley’s famous novel, Frankenstein.

body snatchingVictor Frankenstein collected body parts for his monster through body snatching, a common, though gruesome, practice of the time. Historically, a shortage of cadavers available for medical students created an industry of enterprising thieves who would prowl graveyards for recently buried corpses to sell for medical research. The corpses allowed medical students to learn more about the internal organs of the body and how they work as well as giving doctors the opportunity to improve amputation techniques.

Dr. Frankenstein used electricity to reanimate an assembly of body parts to create hisreanimation monster. This was based on the 18th century work with electricity by surgeon Luigi Galvani, physicist Alessandro Volta, and Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini.

While dissecting a frog near a dissection machine, Galvani’s assistant touched a scalpel to a nerve in the frog’s leg, and the leg jumped! Galvani believed this was evidence of “animal electricity” which came from the frog itself.

Volta replicated Galvani’s experiments, but arrived at different conclusions. He believed the jumping leg was caused by a bimetallic arc, rather than animal electricity.

Aldini built on the work of his uncle and Volta and toured the capitals of Europe to demonstrate the medical benefits of electricity by electrifying the corpses of executed criminals, making them twitch and in some cases, sit up.

It would not be hard for a creative woman, like Mary Shelley, to extend this research and imagine a day when science might succeed in reanimating the dead. To learn more, come check out the exhibit now on display at the Sciences Library!