About Author: Sara Scheib

Posts by Sara Scheib

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Lego Exhibit

It’s the summer of super heroes at the Sciences Library! Come check out our Lego exhibit, featuring Marvel Superheroes, DC Comics Superheroes, and Star Wars sets. Many thanks to the Scheib family for sharing their collection with us.

First floor display case with superhero Legos

third floor display case with Star Wars Legos

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Exhibit: 350th Anniversary of Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation

Newton ExhibitThe new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Isaac Newton and the 350th anniversary of his Universal Law of Gravitation, presented for the first time in 1666.

We’ve all heard the story about Newton and the apple, but how did Newton really come to understand gravity? Our exhibit describes Newton’s life and work, with an emphasis on the Universal Law of Gravitation and its evolution over time. Many thanks to the Department of Physics & Astronomy for loaning us several items for the exhibit, including an antique refracting telescope and a prism like the one used in Newton’s famous light refraction experiments.

To learn more about Newton and his Universal Law of Gravitation, ask a librarian or check out these excellent resources:

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Exhibit: Einstein and the General Theory of Relativity

Pic for blogOur new exhibit at the Sciences Library celebrates the life of Albert Einstein and the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity, presented for the first time in 1915.

The exhibit explains the general theory of relativity and its significance to modern physics. It also provides some interesting background information about his life and family.

To learn more about the general theory of relativity, ask a librarian or check out these cool websites:

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Finals Week at the Sciences Library

10 Reasons to Spend Finals Week at the Sciences Library:

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Holiday hours at the Sciences Library

The Sciences Library will deviate from its normal schedule during the holiday season:

Thanksgiving Recess:

  • Sat., Nov. 21 – Sun., Nov. 22: CLOSED
  • Mon., Nov. 23 – Wed., Nov. 25: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thu., Nov. 26 – Sun., Nov. 29: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Mon., Nov. 30th.

Winter Break:

  • Sat., Dec. 19 – Sun., Dec. 27: CLOSED
  • Mon., Dec. 28 – Thu., Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri., Jan. 1 – Sun., Jan. 3: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 4 – Fri., Jan. 8: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 9 – Sun., Jan. 10: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 11 – Fri., Jan. 15: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 16 – Mon., Jan. 18: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Tues. Jan. 19th.

View all our hours and upcoming events on our calendar. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.

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Exhibit: The Science of Frankenstein

We’ve installed a new exhibit at the Sciences Library, just in time for Halloween!

The Science of Frankenstein explores the scientific practices that inspired Mary Shelley’s famous novel, Frankenstein.

body snatchingVictor Frankenstein collected body parts for his monster through body snatching, a common, though gruesome, practice of the time. Historically, a shortage of cadavers available for medical students created an industry of enterprising thieves who would prowl graveyards for recently buried corpses to sell for medical research. The corpses allowed medical students to learn more about the internal organs of the body and how they work as well as giving doctors the opportunity to improve amputation techniques.

Dr. Frankenstein used electricity to reanimate an assembly of body parts to create hisreanimation monster. This was based on the 18th century work with electricity by surgeon Luigi Galvani, physicist Alessandro Volta, and Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini.

While dissecting a frog near a dissection machine, Galvani’s assistant touched a scalpel to a nerve in the frog’s leg, and the leg jumped! Galvani believed this was evidence of “animal electricity” which came from the frog itself.

Volta replicated Galvani’s experiments, but arrived at different conclusions. He believed the jumping leg was caused by a bimetallic arc, rather than animal electricity.

Aldini built on the work of his uncle and Volta and toured the capitals of Europe to demonstrate the medical benefits of electricity by electrifying the corpses of executed criminals, making them twitch and in some cases, sit up.

It would not be hard for a creative woman, like Mary Shelley, to extend this research and imagine a day when science might succeed in reanimating the dead. To learn more, come check out the exhibit now on display at the Sciences Library!

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Public Seminar on Research Data

On Wednesday, November 11 at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., the University of Iowa Libraries will host guest speaker Heidi Imker, director of the Research Data Service (RDS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Imker’s seminar, “Capitalizing on Research Data: Management, Dissemination, and Archiving,” will explain how researchers can meet new funder requirements for research data management and leverage public access requirements to increase the visibility and impact of their research. Discussion will follow her seminar.

The seminar will be held in the Illinois Room (348) IMU. An informal meet and greet with refreshments will follow. RSVP is requested.

New data sharing requirements

Recently, many federal funding agencies have expanded their requirements for public access to research results. Researchers in all disciplines must now “better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally-funded research.”

Imker urges researchers to view this requirement as an opportunity to regard research data as an important product of scholarly work. Sharing data widely can enhance visibility for researchers, as well as create a collaborative environment of research process verification and results validation.

Such activities will be key to increasing the pace of discovery and demonstrating the importance of research.

In addition, Imker says higher demand for efficient data management tools means researchers may have better options to choose from when it comes to gathering, analyzing, and depositing data in public access repositories.

About the speaker

Imker_sqAs director of RDS, Imker oversees a campus-wide service headquartered in the University of Illinois Library. RDS provides the Illinois research community with the expertise, tools, and infrastructure necessary to manage and steward research data.

Prior to joining the Library, Imker was the Executive Director of the Enzyme Function Initiative, a large-scale collaborative center involving nine universities, funded by the National Institutes of Health and located in the Institute for Genomic Biology.

Imker holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois and completed her postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School.

For more information, please visit http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/data. To RSVP, please visit: http://tiny.cc/Data11-11-15. Please contact us at lib-data@uiowa.edu if you have any questions.

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Pharmaceutical Substances Structure Query

There is a known problem with the Thieme Pharmaceutical Substances Structure Query function. The error messages differ based on your browser. In Internet Explorer: Application Blocked by Java Security. In Chrome: This plugin is not supported. Thieme is aware of the problem and it will be fixed with the next version, scheduled for release early next year.

In the meantime, there is a workaround for Internet Explorer, but you must manually add it to the Java Security Exception Site list:

  1. Go to Control Panel > Java > Security
  2. Click “Edit Site List…”
  3. Click “Add”
  4. Type http://pharmaceutical-substances.thieme.com/prod/ in the Location field
  5. Click “OK”
  6. Click “Continue”
  7. Click “OK and “OK” again to exit the Java Control Panel and save the changes

There is no work around for Chrome.

If you have any problems or questions, please contact the Sciences Library at lib-sciences@uiowa.edu or 319-335-3083.

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