About Author: Sara Scheib

Posts by Sara Scheib


Holiday hours at the Sciences Library

The Sciences Library will deviate from its normal schedule during the holiday season:

Thanksgiving Recess:

  • Sat., Nov. 21 – Sun., Nov. 22: CLOSED
  • Mon., Nov. 23 – Wed., Nov. 25: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Thu., Nov. 26 – Sun., Nov. 29: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Mon., Nov. 30th.

Winter Break:

  • Sat., Dec. 19 – Sun., Dec. 27: CLOSED
  • Mon., Dec. 28 – Thu., Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Fri., Jan. 1 – Sun., Jan. 3: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 4 – Fri., Jan. 8: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 9 – Sun., Jan. 10: CLOSED
  • Mon., Jan. 11 – Fri., Jan. 15: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Sat., Jan. 16 – Mon., Jan. 18: CLOSED

Normal hours will resume on Tues. Jan. 19th.

View all our hours and upcoming events on our calendar. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.


Exhibit: The Science of Frankenstein

We’ve installed a new exhibit at the Sciences Library, just in time for Halloween!

The Science of Frankenstein explores the scientific practices that inspired Mary Shelley’s famous novel, Frankenstein.

body snatchingVictor Frankenstein collected body parts for his monster through body snatching, a common, though gruesome, practice of the time. Historically, a shortage of cadavers available for medical students created an industry of enterprising thieves who would prowl graveyards for recently buried corpses to sell for medical research. The corpses allowed medical students to learn more about the internal organs of the body and how they work as well as giving doctors the opportunity to improve amputation techniques.

Dr. Frankenstein used electricity to reanimate an assembly of body parts to create hisreanimation monster. This was based on the 18th century work with electricity by surgeon Luigi Galvani, physicist Alessandro Volta, and Galvani’s nephew, Giovanni Aldini.

While dissecting a frog near a dissection machine, Galvani’s assistant touched a scalpel to a nerve in the frog’s leg, and the leg jumped! Galvani believed this was evidence of “animal electricity” which came from the frog itself.

Volta replicated Galvani’s experiments, but arrived at different conclusions. He believed the jumping leg was caused by a bimetallic arc, rather than animal electricity.

Aldini built on the work of his uncle and Volta and toured the capitals of Europe to demonstrate the medical benefits of electricity by electrifying the corpses of executed criminals, making them twitch and in some cases, sit up.

It would not be hard for a creative woman, like Mary Shelley, to extend this research and imagine a day when science might succeed in reanimating the dead. To learn more, come check out the exhibit now on display at the Sciences Library!


Public Seminar on Research Data

On Wednesday, November 11 at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., the University of Iowa Libraries will host guest speaker Heidi Imker, director of the Research Data Service (RDS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Imker’s seminar, “Capitalizing on Research Data: Management, Dissemination, and Archiving,” will explain how researchers can meet new funder requirements for research data management and leverage public access requirements to increase the visibility and impact of their research. Discussion will follow her seminar.

The seminar will be held in the Illinois Room (348) IMU. An informal meet and greet with refreshments will follow. RSVP is requested.

New data sharing requirements

Recently, many federal funding agencies have expanded their requirements for public access to research results. Researchers in all disciplines must now “better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally-funded research.”

Imker urges researchers to view this requirement as an opportunity to regard research data as an important product of scholarly work. Sharing data widely can enhance visibility for researchers, as well as create a collaborative environment of research process verification and results validation.

Such activities will be key to increasing the pace of discovery and demonstrating the importance of research.

In addition, Imker says higher demand for efficient data management tools means researchers may have better options to choose from when it comes to gathering, analyzing, and depositing data in public access repositories.

About the speaker

Imker_sqAs director of RDS, Imker oversees a campus-wide service headquartered in the University of Illinois Library. RDS provides the Illinois research community with the expertise, tools, and infrastructure necessary to manage and steward research data.

Prior to joining the Library, Imker was the Executive Director of the Enzyme Function Initiative, a large-scale collaborative center involving nine universities, funded by the National Institutes of Health and located in the Institute for Genomic Biology.

Imker holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois and completed her postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School.

For more information, please visit http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/data. To RSVP, please visit: http://tiny.cc/Data11-11-15. Please contact us at lib-data@uiowa.edu if you have any questions.


Pharmaceutical Substances Structure Query

There is a known problem with the Thieme Pharmaceutical Substances Structure Query function. The error messages differ based on your browser. In Internet Explorer: Application Blocked by Java Security. In Chrome: This plugin is not supported. Thieme is aware of the problem and it will be fixed with the next version, scheduled for release early next year.

In the meantime, there is a workaround for Internet Explorer, but you must manually add it to the Java Security Exception Site list:

  1. Go to Control Panel > Java > Security
  2. Click “Edit Site List…”
  3. Click “Add”
  4. Type http://pharmaceutical-substances.thieme.com/prod/ in the Location field
  5. Click “OK”
  6. Click “Continue”
  7. Click “OK and “OK” again to exit the Java Control Panel and save the changes

There is no work around for Chrome.

If you have any problems or questions, please contact the Sciences Library at lib-sciences@uiowa.edu or 319-335-3083.


Data Management for Researchers

Data Life Cycle

Image courtesy of University of Virginia Library

Are you confused about funding agencies’ new data management and sharing policies? Or do you need some help managing your research data? You’re not alone and we can help! Join us for one of five upcoming workshops (each session is identical):

The purpose of this workshop is to explain research data management and its importance, help identify some common data management issues, and learn about best practices and resources that are available. This workshop is open to all UI students, faculty, and staff. Registration is requested. To register, please click on one of the dates above.

If you have any questions, or if you’d like to request a session for your group, please contact Sara Scheib or Marina Zhang.


Fall 2015 Workshops

Join us at the Sciences Library for our Fall 2015 workshops! Follow the links for descriptions and other details.

These workshops are open to all UI students, faculty and staff. There is no need to register, unless otherwise indicated. If you have any questions, or if you’d like to request a workshop for your class or group, please contact Sara Scheib at sara-scheib@uiowa.edu or (319) 335-3024.


ACS Journals on Mobile Devices

The American Chemical Society has a new mobile site called ACS2GO. If you have an Apple, Android or Blackberry device, you’ll be able to use this site to access our institutional subscriptions both on and off-campus for 120 days. But first, you need to set it up:

  1. On your mobile device, make sure you’re connected to the campus network “eduroam”.
  2. Go to http://pubs.acs.org.
  3. You will be prompted to add ACS2GO to your home screen using the download button.
  4. Use the navigation button and go to My Account.
  5. If everything worked properly, it should say “Your device is paired with UNIV OF IOWA.”

If your access expires, you can renew by repeating this process. If you have any problems or questions, please contact the Sciences Library at 319-335-3083 or lib-sciences@uiowa.edu.


Math Journals Moving

To improve findability of the journals held in the Main Library, the math collection journals are being moved from the 2nd floor to the 3rd floor and will be located adjacent to the other journals. Bookstacks staff are beginning to move these materials upstairs and in a few months you will be able to find the math collection journals in the northeast corner of the third floor. In the meantime, if you have problems locating a title, please contact the Service Desk staff on the 1st floor.

If you have any questions, please contact Leo Clougherty at the Sciences Library. Thank you for your patience as we make this transition.


New Life Sciences Preprint Server: BioRxiv

From Science 14 November 2014:
Vol. 346 no. 6211 pp. 792-793
DOI: 10.1126/science.346.6211.792                        

BioRxiv at 1 year

“A year after its launch, a new preprint server for life sciences is off to a healthy start, its creators say. BioRxiv, a free site sponsored by the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), has attracted more than 800 papers (see graph). Submissions span many disciplines—such as cell biology and cancer research—in which preprint sharing hadn’t been routine. About 28% of authors, who come from 44 countries, have revised their papers, presumably after getting feedback from readers, says John Inglis, executive director of CSHL Press. For scientists who might worry that posting a preprint will jeopardize its chances at a journal, Inglis points out that one-fourth of bioRxiv’s papers have later appeared in journals including Science, Nature, and Cell. http://scim.ag/bioRxiv1yr

BioRxiv is indexed in SciFinder, but not Web of Science, Scopus or PubMed. If you have any questions or if you’d like a demonstration of this database, please contact the Sciences Library.


Halloween Party!

Ready for Halloween? Get a jumpstart on your celebration at the Sciences Library Halloween Party this Sunday, October 26 from 6-10PM!

Activities include:

We hope you can join us. Happy Halloween!