From the collections Category

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Myrtle Aydelotte in the Army Nurse Corps

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Myrtle Kitchell Aydelotte entered the Army Nurse Corps as an assistant chief nurse at the 26th General Hospital in North Africa in 1942, and in 1945 became chief nurse at the 52nd Station Hospital in Italy. At the University of Iowa, she held many positions from 1949 through 1976, including professor of nursing, Director and Dean of the College of Nursing, and director of nursing for the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

In 2008, Kathleen Krebs interviewed Aydelotte about her WWII experiences. Here are some excerpts from her summary of the interview:

“North Africa was a completely different and tremendous learning experience for Kitch and all of her unit. They landed to warmth, sunny skies, exotic aromas, ragged beggars, chaos, and the welcome availability of fresh fruit that, while it was most welcome, also made many nurses sick because it was so long since they had had any. Their bodies had become overly sensitive to citrus.”

“At Bizot, they were forced to set up their hospital in tents, some 400 of them, first housing 1000, then later 2000 beds.”

“Keeping things sterile was the number one priority and amid blowing dirt and sand, operating almost continuously with insufficient supplies, and with many infected wounds, this was a major priority and vigilance was at a maximum to prevent cross-contamination of patients. Flies were the bane of their existence and they discovered that their helmets were all-purpose vessels: they could bathe, shampoo, and launder in them.”

Myrtle K. Aydelotte donated her papers, including her memoirs, to the Iowa Women’s Archives in 1996.

Guide to the Myrtle Kitchell Aydelotte Papers

Iowa Digital Library

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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Code for Coeds

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The “Code for Coeds” is a guide to campus life that was given to incoming women students at the University of Iowa from 1937 to 1968. This 1944-45 edition is included in the Louise Goldman Papers, and Goldman edited the handbook for the University Women’s Association.

Sounds like parties at the Union were very classy, with an orchestra, program, and soft lighting. Indeed, “There’s nothing like Iowa on a Saturday night!”

Guide to the Louise Goldman Papers

[From: Louise Goldman Papers. Series 2: State University of Iowa (University of Iowa). “Code for Coeds” – 1944-1945.]

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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“The Newhall Girls of 1927”

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Welcome to Women’s History Wednesday!

In 1924, the Iowa High School Athletic Association decided that organized basketball was “unhealthy” for girls and announced their decision to eliminate the girls’ state championship tournament. In response, female athletes statewide took action; that included members of the Newhall team, pictured here, who rode on horseback from farm to farm to win their neighbors’ support.

Those efforts paid off big for Newhall’s players, who in 1927 won the first-ever girls state championship under the newly-founded Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. After a breathless night following the game remotely — it wasn’t broadcast on the radio, so fans gathered at a Newhall restaurant where the tournament plays were called out via a long-distance phone call — the whole town turned out the next morning to welcome their champions back home.

As one newspaper report described it, “The Newhall Girls of 1927 have given the town a place in the sun.”

Newhall items from the Rural Women Digital Collection

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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Gladys Conn’s five-year diary

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A five-year diary belonging to Gladys Conn, social worker and graduate of the State University of Iowa (now the University of Iowa). The first entry in the diary is dated January 1, 1932, at which time she would have been in school. It’s hard to tell what year this entry is from, but here is what Gladys wrote on November 1:

The Tragedy of Niginsky by ___

Enjoyed very much

It turns out that “The Tragedy of Nijinsky” is by Anatole Bourman and Dorothy Lyman and was first published in 1936. So it appears that Gladys did continue to use this diary, at least occasionally, over the span of a few years. And isn’t that usually the way it is with these five-year diaries?

Guide to the Gladys Conn Papers

[From: Gladys Conn Papers. Series 3: Diaries. Chronological (2 volumes). 1929-1932.]

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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Mildred Wirt Benson, Iowa’s most successful “ghost”

"Ghost Gables"

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Welcome to Women’s History Wednesday, now in our fancy new home at the Iowa Women’s Archives tumblr!

Despite our recent Mildred Wirt Benson gif-a-thon, we couldn’t resist one more post on Iowa’s most successful “ghost” for Halloween.

In a 1973 essay for our Books at Iowa journal, Benson described getting her start as a ghost writer. Soon after graduating from the University of Iowa in 1925, she was hired by Stratemeyer Syndicate as one of “a few ‘ghosts’ who accepted a brief plot outline, vanished, and returned to the office weeks later with a finished manuscript.” She eventually took on an assignment to launch the Nancy Drew series, and created a strong, independent heroine — one who “might rate as a pioneer of Women’s Lib,” according to Benson. The Syndicate was initially less than pleased:

“Mr. Stratemeyer expressed bitter disappointment when he received the first manuscript, The Secret of the Old Clock, saying the heroine was much too flip and would never be well received. On the contrary, when the first three volumes hit the market they were an immediate cash-register success for the syndicate. Over a thirty-eight-year period, the series was printed in seventeen languages and, according to a published report [from 1969], achieved sales of more than 30,000,000 copies.”

Benson then states the most blood-chilling part of her tale: “As ‘ghost’ I received $125 to $250 a story, all rights released.”

Read Benson’s “The Ghost of Ladora” essay

Browse the Mildred Wirt Benson digital collection

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

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eras of emma: the emma goldman clinic through four decades

eras of emma:  the emma goldman clinic through four decades

Join us for a panel discussion featuring women who have been active in Iowa City’s feminist health clinic founded in 1973. The clinic had its origins in an abortion referral service started by Iowa City’s Women’s Liberation Front in 1971. The Emma Goldman Clinic for Women opened September 1, 1973 in a house at 715 North Dodge Street, just months after Roe v. Wade was decided by the United States Supreme Court. Initially focused on woman-centered health care, the Emma Goldman Clinic later expanded its mission to provide reproductive health care for men as well as women.
 
The panel will be moderated by Karen Kubby, former director of the clinic, and will include clinic founder Deborah Nye, first director Marilyn Cohen, current director Jennifer Price, and board member Jorie Slodki.
 
 
Friday, October 18, 2013
 
1:00-2:30 p.m.
 
Iowa Women’s Archives,
3rd floor, Main Library
The University of Iowa
 
  egc newsletter w Our Bodies  EGC n dodge house in snow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Left: The first home of the Clinic, at 715 N. Dodge, Iowa City.
 
Right: The cover of a 1979 newsletter put out by the Clinic. Note the speculum in the back pocket and the copy of Our Bodies Ourselves on the chest of drawers. The newsletter was later renamed Emma’s Periodical Rag.
 
Both items are from the Emma Goldman Clinic records in the Iowa Women’s Archives.
 
 

 

 

 

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“Life is not all sunshine”

Viola Nesfield Owen papers

by Audrey Altman

Preserving the history of poor and rural women is a mission of the Iowa Women’s Archives, but it can be challenging because these women rarely leave detailed records of their lives. That’s why we were so excited to receive the papers of Viola Nesfield Owen, donated by Gary Whitehead.  The collection contains dozens of letters between his grandmother, Viola Nesfield Owen, and her family, written from 1921 to 1963.

A few letters from the Viola Nesfield Owen papers.

Viola was a high-spirited woman who saw her family through many hardships, and her letters give insight into how Midwestern women dealt with family, work, and financial hardships.

Viola Nesfield was born in 1896.  She grew up in Waterloo, Iowa, with her father, step-mother and two younger half-sisters.  In 1921, Viola planned to marry Vern Owen.  Since Vern was divorced, their engagement was somewhat scandalous for Viola’s family.  Yet Viola and Vern were not to be deterred.  They eloped and moved to Wisconsin. This is when the collection of letters between Viola Nesfield Owen and her family begins.  The first few years of letters from the Nesfields to Viola are filled with appeals to return home and anxious parental advice.

In 1924, Viola’s father wrote:  “When I am at work I lots of times get worried about you.  I wish you would begin to look forward for you are sure to get some rainy days.  You know life is not all sunshine.  Try to save all you can.” (June 20, 1924)

But Viola did not move home.  Instead, she and Vern started a family.  Her children are by far the most common topic of her letters.  My favorite of Viola’s letters is dated August 14, 1928.  It was written from her hospital bed, shortly after she delivered her first child, Robert Harrison.  In big, messy letters that practically fall off the lines of the page, she wrote, “How I wish you could see him.  He is so cute and ‘fat as butter.’”

It’s hard not to admire Viola, who was sometimes called “Ha! Ha!” for her unquenchable good spirits.  Her daughter, Betty, nearly died of kidney disease when she was two years old.  Viola made a pact with God that if He spared Betty’s life, she would never complain about her hardships.  It is evident in her letters that Viola tried hard to keep this promise, even though her family experienced dire poverty through the 1920s and 1930s.

In 1927, the Owens moved into a tar paper shack in Janesville, Wisconsin, with no electricity or running water.  Yet Viola’s letter bearing the news to her family reflected no bitterness.  She mused, “We ought to save money here.  No place to spend it.” (October 9, 1927).

Viola Nesfield Owen

Viola Nesfield Owen

During the Depression, Viola’s husband Vern struggled to hold a job.  Viola worked as a pianist, piano and accordion teacher, and as a transcriber for the WPA Braille Project.  Despite Viola’s contribution to the family income, they often struggled financially, and Viola’s optimistic resolve was tested.  On January 13, 1933, she wrote: “I would be so glad if Vern could make a dollar a week.  Now I don’t mean to complain and I always said I never would if Betty love could only get better and the rest of us keep our good health, but if I don’t write very soon you will know Vern is still jobless… Soliders and Sailors Relief are getting me a pair of shoes today.  Isn’t it awful to have to depend on somebody like that but what can you do? I was walking on the ground.”

But the next month, Viola had found something to celebrate again:  “I was so extravagant I ate a whole orange all by myself.  Ha! Ha!” (February 2, 1933)  During the 1940s, Viola found new independence.  She started working for Parker Pen in Janesville, WI, and wrote excitedly about her various administrative duties at the factory.  She also divorced her husband, but continued to care for him, especially after he suffered a stroke in 1948.  Viola and her family continued to write each other, and the collection of letters extends to 1963.

Audrey Altman, a graduate student in the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, processed the Viola Nesfield Owen papers while working in the Iowa Women’s Archives in 2011/2012.

 

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Cards from Christmases Past

By Christine Vivian, SLIS student and IWA student assistant

 
One of the lovely surprises of The Iowa Women’s Archives is the number of collections which contain holiday cards, such as the Shirley Briggs Papers. Briggs, an artist and naturalist, created a new hand-drawn card every year for over 50 years. Receving one of these works of art year after year must have been a wonderful tradition for her friends and family. To carry on this tradition, we share some of those cards with you here, with our hopes for a happy holiday season.

 

Shirley Brigg at U.S. Capitol

Card showing Briggs hanging a Chrismas banner near the U.S. Capitol, 1948.

 

Christmas Tree reflected in the ocean.

Evergreen tree reflected in the ocean by sea creatures. Note Shirley Briggs’ tiny self-portrait.

 

Tiny Shirley Briggs atop the Washington Monument, undated.

 

Mockingbird in holly, 1955.

 

To see an exhibit about Shirley Briggs’ work and her friendship with Rachel Carson, please stop by the University of Iowa Sciences Library before January 7th.

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Thanksgiving in Osage, 1950s-style

In 1950, Joyce Horton was a junior at the University of Iowa studying speech pathology. She was active in the Foreign Students Association, a group she really enjoyed. A few weeks before Thanksgiving she wrote a letter to the newspaper in her hometown of Osage, Iowa, suggesting that residents invite these students to spend Thanksgiving weekend in their homes, some 160 miles from Iowa City.  

As Joyce later recalled, “The letter was printed.  Some Osage folks liked the idea–and so did the foreign students. Twelve of them came with me to Osage that year and 44 came my senior year.”    

Osage family visiting with international student, 1952.

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University students enjoying Thanksgiving dinner with Osage residents, 1952.

With the support of the local Rotary International group, Osage International Weekend became a tradition.At the time of Joyce Horton Beisswenger’s death in 2002, the program was still actively inviting international members of the university community to experience the holiday in the homes of local families.

International students with some new friends.

After graduating from the University of Iowa in 1952, Joyce Horton attended Yale Divinity School, where she met her future husband Don Beisswenger. They were active in the civil rights movement in Chicago in the 1960s before moving to Tennessee, where she earned a degree in social work.

A scrapbook documenting Osage International Weekend is among the papers of Joyce Horton Beisswenger (1930-2002) in the Iowa Women’s Archives.

 

 

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A history major’s thoughts on working in the IWA

Froilan Orozco
 

I am currently a senior at the University of Iowa and am majoring in history. To get a general idea of the kind of work a historian can do I decided to get a part-time position in the Iowa Women’s Archives (IWA). 

Froilan Orozco

Froilan Orozco in front of the Muscatine Migrant Committee sign in the Iowa Women's Archives reading room.

The activities that I have been involved in this job so far have consisted of moving boxes of historical records and helping to process material to be put in thearchives. I have worked on two collections. One dealt with the League of Women Voters of Johnson County (LWV-JC).  I found it difficult trying to find some kind of order in which to put the material. I benefited from this exercise because I really had no idea what the League of Women Voters was about, but by the end of sorting everything out I was able to get some knowledge on different aspects of the LWV.

The second collection I looked at was of some material donated by Salvador Lopez. It consisted of information on Antonia and Frederico Lopez. I had a better idea of how to work with this collection because it was not as big as the LWV. In working with this collection I learned how to compose a finding aid. While looking through the material I became exposed to the lives of different people who I could relate to. Much of the collection consisted of correspondence between Antonia and Frederico Lopez with their siblings in Mexico. The letters are written in Spanish and being a native Spanish speaker I found this part of the job to be fun because I was able to use my native language and learn the style of writing a letter in Spanish. I have written a few emails to Spanish speaking friends outside of the United States using the beginning style of many of the letters in this collection. There is a certificate of naturalization found in the collection that belonged to Frederico Lopez. This certificate made me wonder how my parents and sibling got their certificate of naturalization. In the collection of Antonia and Frederico getting a certificate is shown as a process that took quite some time. The courses that I have taken at the University of Iowa also helped in understanding some of the material. For example, I was able to see that the Mexican Revolution was a push factor for the Lopez family to leave Mexico and that the jobs offered in Iowa were a pull factor into that state. What I discovered from the letters was that communication by Antonia and Frederico Lopez with family back in Mexico was hard to maintain, which caused some concern from certain individuals in the family. I learned that in several occasions the family in Iowa sent money back to the family in Mexico. Health was also a main concern in many of the letters. Also the discussion of becoming naturalized was presented in one of the letters.

The hardest part of this process was to keep from researching every piece of information. I learned that this collection plays a part with other collections in the Mujeres Latinas Project in the IWA. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is also a collection that is located in the IWA. The fact that all these collections are tied together helps me develop a better story about Antonia and Frederico Lopez.

I was told that the finding aid is only supposed to give a glimpse of the material that can be found in the collection and is not meant to be a replacement. I have learned that the finding aid is a tool that is used as reference to the material in a collection and that it can be a very long process for an archivist to do. The organizational skills that I have been learning in this job have really helped me outside of this experience. This job has given me more appreciation for archives and archivists because after working on these two collections I have seen and learned how much work is needed in processing material. Another cool part of this job is the fact that I have been able to access parts of the library which in the past had always been a mystery to me.

–Froilan Orozco, Fall 2011