About Author: Ariana Santiago

Posts by Ariana Santiago

0

Code for Coeds

code1

code2

The “Code for Coeds” is a guide to campus life that was given to incoming women students at the University of Iowa from 1937 to 1968. This 1944-45 edition is included in the Louise Goldman Papers, and Goldman edited the handbook for the University Women’s Association.

Sounds like parties at the Union were very classy, with an orchestra, program, and soft lighting. Indeed, “There’s nothing like Iowa on a Saturday night!”

Guide to the Louise Goldman Papers

[From: Louise Goldman Papers. Series 2: State University of Iowa (University of Iowa). “Code for Coeds” - 1944-1945.]

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Living Learning Community in IWA

newintown1

newintown2

On Tuesday of this week, the Iowa Women’s Archives held an event for the “New in Town” Living Learning Community. We asked the question, “What was it like to be a student at Iowa 100 years ago?” Each table represented a decade from the 1910’s all the way to the 2000’s, so the group of first year students got the chance to explore the history of student life at the University of Iowa. Scrapbooks and yearbooks were a big hit!

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

“The Newhall Girls of 1927″

tumblr_mvnpxzDCIq1smqom2o1_r3_500

tumblr_mvnpxzDCIq1smqom2o2_r2_1280

Welcome to Women’s History Wednesday!

In 1924, the Iowa High School Athletic Association decided that organized basketball was “unhealthy” for girls and announced their decision to eliminate the girls’ state championship tournament. In response, female athletes statewide took action; that included members of the Newhall team, pictured here, who rode on horseback from farm to farm to win their neighbors’ support.

Those efforts paid off big for Newhall’s players, who in 1927 won the first-ever girls state championship under the newly-founded Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. After a breathless night following the game remotely — it wasn’t broadcast on the radio, so fans gathered at a Newhall restaurant where the tournament plays were called out via a long-distance phone call — the whole town turned out the next morning to welcome their champions back home.

As one newspaper report described it, “The Newhall Girls of 1927 have given the town a place in the sun.”

Newhall items from the Rural Women Digital Collection

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Gladys Conn’s five-year diary

diary1

diary2

diary3

diary4

A five-year diary belonging to Gladys Conn, social worker and graduate of the State University of Iowa (now the University of Iowa). The first entry in the diary is dated January 1, 1932, at which time she would have been in school. It’s hard to tell what year this entry is from, but here is what Gladys wrote on November 1:

The Tragedy of Niginsky by ___

Enjoyed very much

It turns out that “The Tragedy of Nijinsky” is by Anatole Bourman and Dorothy Lyman and was first published in 1936. So it appears that Gladys did continue to use this diary, at least occasionally, over the span of a few years. And isn’t that usually the way it is with these five-year diaries?

Guide to the Gladys Conn Papers

[From: Gladys Conn Papers. Series 3: Diaries. Chronological (2 volumes). 1929-1932.]

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.

0

Mildred Wirt Benson, Iowa’s most successful “ghost”

"Ghost Gables"

tumblr_mvhqouvMBC1smqom2o3_r1_400 tumblr_mvhqouvMBC1smqom2o4_r1_400 tumblr_mvhqouvMBC1smqom2o2_r1_400

Welcome to Women’s History Wednesday, now in our fancy new home at the Iowa Women’s Archives tumblr!

Despite our recent Mildred Wirt Benson gif-a-thon, we couldn’t resist one more post on Iowa’s most successful “ghost” for Halloween.

In a 1973 essay for our Books at Iowa journal, Benson described getting her start as a ghost writer. Soon after graduating from the University of Iowa in 1925, she was hired by Stratemeyer Syndicate as one of “a few ‘ghosts’ who accepted a brief plot outline, vanished, and returned to the office weeks later with a finished manuscript.” She eventually took on an assignment to launch the Nancy Drew series, and created a strong, independent heroine — one who “might rate as a pioneer of Women’s Lib,” according to Benson. The Syndicate was initially less than pleased:

“Mr. Stratemeyer expressed bitter disappointment when he received the first manuscript, The Secret of the Old Clock, saying the heroine was much too flip and would never be well received. On the contrary, when the first three volumes hit the market they were an immediate cash-register success for the syndicate. Over a thirty-eight-year period, the series was printed in seventeen languages and, according to a published report [from 1969], achieved sales of more than 30,000,000 copies.”

Benson then states the most blood-chilling part of her tale: “As ‘ghost’ I received $125 to $250 a story, all rights released.”

Read Benson’s “The Ghost of Ladora” essay

Browse the Mildred Wirt Benson digital collection

*This post is duplicated from the Iowa Women’s Archives Tumblr.