October is National Medical Librarians Month

This month is National Medical Librarian Month and the theme from the Medical Library Association is “Saving You Time So You Can Save Lives.”  Hardin Library offers a variety of services to save you time whether you are a student, faculty, staff, resident, fellow, physician, or other health professional.

Hardin Library Open House
Come celebrate National Medical Librarians Month with us on October 17, 2013 from 11:30am – 1:30pm at the 3rd floor service desk.  We’ll have free refreshments, novelty clocks, and the opportunity for tours of our fascinating building.  You might just find out if Hardin Library is haunted. I can’t tell you, but there may be an answer on our trivia display.

NMLM Display 2013

This display can be found on the third floor of Hardin Library between the service desk and 24 hour study area. This display will be up through the end of October.

10 Ways that Hardin Library Can Save You Time

  1. Hardin Open Workshops – Learn some new skills in our free 1 hour classes.  If the time doesn’t work for you or you’d like to schedule a special session for a group, feel free to contact us. We’re very flexible.
  2. Interlibrary Loan – Don’t settle for an article or book that isn’t exactly what you need for your research. If the University of Iowa doesn’t have the material you need, we can order it from another library. This service is free to our affiliates.
  3. Document Delivery – Do we have something you need, but you can’t leave your office? Maybe it’s too cold to trek across the river to another library. Don’t worry. We can send library materials straight to your office. If you need an article, we will scan the material and email you the PDF.
  4. Subject Guides – Did you know that Hardin librarians have created subject specific guides to put many of the resources you need (databases, books, journals, etc.) all in one convenient location? We don’t want the research process to be as easy as possible.  We’re also happy to take suggestions if you know of something that’s missing from a guide.
  5. Electronic Books – Many of our textbooks are available online, 24/7 both on-campus and off-campus (as long as you have a Hawk ID and password).
  6. Electronic Journals – Most of our journals are available online, 24/7 both on-campus and off-campus (as long as you have a Hawk ID and password).
  7. High Powered Databases – Don’t waste your time sifting through hundreds of thousands of links from a search engine. Many of our databases offer point of care information or specialized filters to get you the information you need quickly.  And, Hardin Librarians can teach you the most efficient ways to search these databases.
  8. Mobile Resources – Hardin Library supports a wide variety of apps with health sciences information.  We can also help you download apps to your mobile device.
  9. One on One Consultations – Are you struggling to find the information you need? Do you need help using EndNote or RefWorks? Hardin Librarians can meet with you by phone, email, chat, or in person. We can even come to your office!
  10. Personalized Library Liaisons – Hardin Library has different liaisons assigned to different departments so that we can better serve your needs.

National Medical Librarians Month Contest

One way librarians save people time is by answering questions. How many questions were answered by Hardin Library staff in September of 2013? Guess correctly, and you could win a gift card to the Iowa Hawk Shop Tech Connection!

To enter this contest, fill out a registration form at our main service desk on the 3rd floor of Hardin Library. This contest is open to University of Iowa affiliates, only. The winner will be announced in early November.

ContestFlyer

 

 

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Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have long been considered one of the highest levels of evidence, and lately, publication frequency in health science journals is on the rise.  However, there are still a lot of people who are unaware of what goes into writing a systematic review or a meta-analysis. This post will discuss what a systematic review entails, how it differs from a meta-analysis, and the value that librarians bring to both types of studies.

A systematic review is a research study that seeks to find all the high quality studies done on a given topic so that they can be summarized into one article.  If the studies are homogenous or similar enough to one another, the data can be extracted and combined using statistical formulas. This statistical compilation of data is a meta-analysis. Not all systematic reviews contain a meta-analysis, but all citations to be included in a meta-analysis should be located through a systematic search, to reduce the risk of bias.

An important part of preparing a systematic review is to ensure that the method used is explicit and transparent, allowing for another team to replicate the process. The first step involves putting together a team of at least two researchers who will independently review the studies located.  These researchers then develop a research question and write up a protocol that explicitly detailing how the systematic review will be carried out. One of the details is the criteria against which studies will be assessed for inclusion in the review. It is highly recommended that researchers register their protocols before they begin the formal search for studies.  Once the protocol is in place, the search for and review of high quality studies can begin. Systematic reviews can take anywhere from one year to eighteen months to complete due to the rigorous nature of the review process. Librarians are highly skilled and trained to develop what are often complicated and lengthy search strategies in order to locate as many relevant studies as possible.  They are also familiar with standards and basic steps for completing a systematic review. In the report, Finding What Works in Health Care: Standards for Systematic Reviews, the Institute of Medicine recommends working with a librarian or other information specialist to plan out the search strategy and to peer review the final strategy used to locate studies. Three of the librarians are Hardin Library have attended the Systematic Review Workshop: The Nuts and Bolts for Librarians which takes place over the course of two and a half days.

If you would like to learn more about conducting and locating systematic reviews, please see the Systematic Review LibGuide. You are also welcome to contact us if you have any questions.

Image of Getting Help page on guide

Happy Match Day to Carver College of Medicine Students!

Congrats CCOM Graduates!!!Today is Match Day. This is the day when 4th year medical students find out which programs they have matched with and where they will be starting their residencies. If you’d like to learn more, the Carver College of Medicine has a map showing where students headed last year along with other data from previous years on their Match Week website.  http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/md/match/

To all of our M4′s, good luck in your future endeavors and congratulations from all of us at Hardin Library!

 

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Problems with Logging into NCBI and Proxy

It has come to our attention that some people are unable to access their NCBI accounts from off-campus.  Occasionally, access from on-campus is also not working. With this problem, attempts to log into NCBI accounts result in the page failing to load completely. Sometimes, there is a notice at the bottom of the screen that you can click to allow the page to completely load, but that isn’t always the case.

It turns out there is a problem with the way that the library’s proxy server is interacting with the NCBI login page.  (The proxy server is what makes the links to full-text work.) The issue is being addressed, but in the meantime, if you want to use your NCBI account through the Hardin Library website, please use the following link: PubMed NCBI. You should use this link instead of the link at the top right of the PubMed website.

Picture of NCBI link in PubMed

Once you are logged into NCBI, you can access PubMed by using the link at the bottom of the page as shown in this image.

Picture of the PubMed Link from the NCBI page

If you continue to have problems accessing your NCBI account or have any other questions, please contact Hardin Library.

 

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