Need to publish? Learn how to identify and evaluate open access journals & identify predatory publishers | Workshop Thurs. April 13 @Hardin Library

You need to publish your research, but there seem to be many choices.  We can help you find the right fit.

Janna Lawrence, Deputy Director Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

This workshop will provide information about open access publishing, detail the reasons for the open access publishing movement, and describe key elements of predatory publishers.

A process often used by UI Librarians to critically evaluate the quality of open access journals will be shared to allow participants to improve their skills/efficiency with appraisal. Information about open access mandates will be included, as well as an overview of how the UI Libraries Open Access Fund works.

Thursday, April 13
11am-12pm
Hardin Library, Information Commons East, 2nd Floor

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.  Directions to Hardin Library.

No time for the workshop?  Contact your subject specialist for individual instruction.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program please call Janna Lawrence at 319-335-9871.

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You Light Up My Life… For Earth Month!

 

You know you want to “go green,” but there are SO many ways and so many choices – where do you start?

One good place to start is with your lighting! We all need lights and light bulbs in our homes – so why not start there!

Light bulbs on the market now are more environmentally friendly and can save you money. But, with all the different types of bulbs available, how do you know which bulbs are right for your situation? There are the incandescent, fluorescent, halogen, light-emitting diodes (LED), and compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL)… So, what’s a person to do?

Let me “enlighten” you….

Before you start making decisions on what lighting is right for you, here is a quick lesson in lighting terminology:

  • Wattage: The amount of electricity consumed by a light source
  • Lumens: The amount of light that a light source produces
  • Efficacy: Lumens per watt
  • Footcandles: the amount of light reaching a subject

 

A frosted incandescent light bulb.

You know how when you go to change an incandescent light bulb and it is hot to the touch? In Green Goes with Everything: Simple Steps to a Healthier Life and a Cleaner Planet author Sloan Barnett explains that happens because an incandescent bulb is “…basically a little electric space heater that just happens to also give off light.” Do you know if you have a 60 watt incandescent bulb, the wattage refers to how much energy the bulb uses (60 watts) – not how much light is given off…

 

A CFL bulb produces a warm, soft, diffused light and can last up to 10,000 hours! They emit as much light as an incandescent bulb, but use one-fourth the energy.

CFL Compact Fluorescent Light

A downside of CFL bulbs is that they take longer to reach full illumination. They are also more expensive than incandescent bulbs. However, they last so much longer they will more than pay for themselves over the long run. Another downside is that CFL bulbs contain a small amount of mercury which can be released if it breaks or is disposed of improperly. Even with the mercury each bulb contains, the EPA says CFL bulbs still help reduce mercury emissions in the United States because of significant energy savings.  They reduce the demand for electricity, which reduces the amount of coal burned by power plants, which reduces emissions of mercury when the coal is burned.

There are specific cleanup instructions if a bulb containing mercury should happen to break. These include airing the room out, specific materials to clean up and dispose of the broken bulb. Visit the EPA website in order to find out the complete instructions for cleaning up a broken CFL bulb. It is important to recycle used CFLs, also. Recycling prevents the release of mercury into the environment. Most of the materials in fluorescent bulbs are recyclable and can be reused. Many states and local jurisdictions have regulations about disposal of CFL bulbs, so be sure to check your local regulations. Visit the EPA recycling webpage for more information.

Think a CFL bulb is too harsh, too white and way too bright? Many new CFL bulbs are designed to mimic the yellowy light of an incandescent bulb. There are now silicone covered CFL bulbs which give off a softer, more pleasant glow.

Philips WhiteVision Halogen Headlight Bulb

 

A Halogen bulb – or a “tungsten-halogen filament incandescent bulb” – contains a small capsule of halogen gas, which provides a bright white light. They produce more light, use less energy and last longer than the standard incandescent bulb. They do cost more, but last from 2-3 years. Halogen bulbs are often used in vehicle headlights.

 

An LED uses semiconductor technology to emit narrow-spectrum diodes when an electrical current passes through it. In 2014, 19% of global electricity and 6% of greenhouse gas emissions were attributable to lighting. In the beginning, only red LEDs were available and used primarily as the indicator lights in electronic appliances and equipment. Green, yellow and blue LEDs are now available – most of the new holiday lights are the primary colored LED lights. White, super-bright, LEDs are now widely used in entertainment, retail, residential, safety and security lighting, and outdoor area lighting, not to mention backlit TVs and video screens.

Want a little guidance when selecting your light bulbs? Energy Star has a guide on their webpage to help you choose just the right bulb. An Energy Star light bulb has:

  • Been independently certified to deliver efficiency & performance
  • Has the same brightness (lumens), 90% less energy (watts)
  • Will last 15 times longer – which equals money savings
  • They help protect the environment & prevent climate change

 

Want to try your hand at making your own LED lightbulb?

 

 

light-bulb-types

 

 

 

Resources:

Horn, Greg. 2006. Living green : a practical guide for simple sustainability. Topanga, CA : Free Press. Engineering Library RA776.5 .H65 2006

Ryan, Eric. 2008.  Squeaky green : the Method guide to detoxing your home. San Francisco : Chronicle Books. Engineering Library RA770.5 .R993 2008

Barnett, Sloan. 2008. Green goes with everything : simple steps to a healthier life and a cleaner planet. New York : Atria Books. Engineering Library RA770 .B37 2008

Lo, Teddy. 2014. Planet LED. Novato, California : ORO Editions. Engineering Library TK7871 .89 .L53 L6 2014

Choose a Light Guide. Energy Star : The simple choice for energy efficiency. EPA and DOE. Date accessed: Dec. 6, 2016

Types of Light Sources and Light Bulbs. 2016. American Lighting Association.

Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs (CFLs). Aug. 10, 2016. US Environmental Protection Agency.

Make Your Own LED Libghtbulb! May 22, 2015.  youtube

Other Resources:

United States. Federal Trade Commission. Office of Consumer and Business Education, : United States. Department of Energy. 2006. Energy efficient light bulbs a bright idea. Washington, D.D. : Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Office of Consumer and Business Education. Digital PDF [electronic resource].

Get to know your light bulbs with our comprehensive type guides. Bulbs.com : The LED Authority. Date accessed Feb. 6, 2017.

Christmas Lights Power Consumption. Feb. 6, 2017. Christmas Lights, Etc.

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News and Updates 3/30/2017

Laura hampton holding cards  Newsfeed: Travel Grant Applications due April 15, 2017 http://iowawomensarchives.tumblr.com/post/158778861035/every-girl-has-a-voice-every-woman-has-a-story   Instruction: Play testing began on Amy Chen’s second game, Mark! Check out the development on Twitter through #markthegame. Exhibitions: […]
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Travel Grant Applications due April 15, 2017

Linda and Richard Kerber Fund for Research in the Iowa Women’s Archives

In honor of Linda and Richard Kerber’s enduring support for scholarship in the history of women, the Iowa Women’s Archives (University of Iowa Libraries) announces a grant of $1000 to fund travel to Iowa City, Iowa, to conduct research in the Iowa Women’s Archives.  We welcome applicants from a variety of backgrounds, including graduate students, academic and public historians, and independent researchers and writers, although preference will be given to graduate students. The grant is intended to offset travel and lodging expenses of researchers whose work will benefit from using collections in the archives.  The strengths of the Iowa Women’s Archives include rich collections on the history of the women’s movement, political activism, African Americans, rural women, and Latinas, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  The collections are global in scope.  (See http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa/viewshare/).

Grant recipients are expected to donate a courtesy copy of any publications that make use of the collections, and to acknowledge support of the Iowa Women’s Archives in any theses, dissertations, and publications.

Applications should be sent to lib-women@uiowa.edu with the subject line TRAVEL GRANT APPLICATION. Applications must be received via email by April 15, 2017.  Notification of awards will be made by May 1, 2017.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

Who is eligible?

  • We welcome applications from graduate students, academic and public historians, and independent researchers and writers who reside outside a 100-mile radius of Iowa City, Iowa, and whose research projects would be substantially enriched by the use of materials held by the Iowa Women’s Archives.
  • Research topics should be strongly supported by the collections of the Iowa Women’s Archives. We encourage each prospective grant applicant to discuss his or her research project and the collections that might support it with the Iowa Women’s Archives staff before submitting an application.
  • For information about the collections, please see our collection guides.

What expenses does the award cover?

  • The award may be used for travel and lodging but not for meals or photocopying.  Prior to applying, non-US citizens should contact the library regarding visas or other required paperwork.

How do I apply?

The application packet consists of the following:

    • A one-page letter of application. Be sure to state your name, mailing address, email address, and phone number.
    • A research proposal of no more than 500 words describing the purpose of the research, the Iowa Women’s Archives holdings to be consulted, and the significance of these holdings to the overall project.
    • A curriculum vita of no more than two pages.
    • A proposed budget (not to exceed $1000) indicating how the funds will be spent.

Submit application to lib-women@uiowa.edu  with the subject line TRAVEL GRANT APPLICATION. If you do not receive an email within 3 days confirming that your application has been received, please contact karen-mason@uiowa.edu  or  janet-weaver@uiowa.edu and write TRAVEL FUND in the subject line.

What dates do I need to remember?

  • Applications must be emailed by April 15, 2017.
  • Grant recipients will be notified by May 1, 2017.
  • Funds must be spent between June 1, 2017 and May 31, 2018.

For questions about the program, please contact:  karen-mason@uiowa.edu  or  janet-weaver@uiowa.edu and write TRAVEL FUND in the subject line.

 

Iowa Women’s Archives
The University of Iowa Libraries
125 West Washington Street
Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1420

319-335-5068

http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa/

lib-women@uiowa.edu

Posted in Uncategorized

Travel Grant Applications due April 15, 2017

Linda and Richard Kerber Fund for Research in the Iowa Women’s Archives

In honor of Linda and Richard Kerber’s enduring support for scholarship in the history of women, the Iowa Women’s Archives (University of Iowa Libraries) announces a grant of $1000 to fund travel to Iowa City, Iowa, to conduct research in the Iowa Women’s Archives.  We welcome applicants from a variety of backgrounds, including graduate students, academic and public historians, and independent researchers and writers, although preference will be given to graduate students. The grant is intended to offset travel and lodging expenses of researchers whose work will benefit from using collections in the archives.  The strengths of the Iowa Women’s Archives include rich collections on the history of the women’s movement, political activism, African Americans, rural women, and Latinas, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  The collections are global in scope.  (See http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa/viewshare/).

Grant recipients are expected to donate a courtesy copy of any publications that make use of the collections, and to acknowledge support of the Iowa Women’s Archives in any theses, dissertations, and publications.

Applications should be sent to lib-women@uiowa.edu with the subject line TRAVEL GRANT APPLICATION. Applications must be received via email by April 15, 2017.  Notification of awards will be made by May 1, 2017.

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

Who is eligible?

  • We welcome applications from graduate students, academic and public historians, and independent researchers and writers who reside outside a 100-mile radius of Iowa City, Iowa, and whose research projects would be substantially enriched by the use of materials held by the Iowa Women’s Archives.
  • Research topics should be strongly supported by the collections of the Iowa Women’s Archives. We encourage each prospective grant applicant to discuss his or her research project and the collections that might support it with the Iowa Women’s Archives staff before submitting an application.
  • For information about the collections, please see our collection guides.

What expenses does the award cover?

  • The award may be used for travel and lodging but not for meals or photocopying.  Prior to applying, non-US citizens should contact the library regarding visas or other required paperwork.

How do I apply?

The application packet consists of the following:

    • A one-page letter of application. Be sure to state your name, mailing address, email address, and phone number.
    • A research proposal of no more than 500 words describing the purpose of the research, the Iowa Women’s Archives holdings to be consulted, and the significance of these holdings to the overall project.
    • A curriculum vita of no more than two pages.
    • A proposed budget (not to exceed $1000) indicating how the funds will be spent.

Submit application to lib-women@uiowa.edu  with the subject line TRAVEL GRANT APPLICATION. If you do not receive an email within 3 days confirming that your application has been received, please contact karen-mason@uiowa.edu  or  janet-weaver@uiowa.edu and write TRAVEL FUND in the subject line.

What dates do I need to remember?

  • Applications must be emailed by April 15, 2017.
  • Grant recipients will be notified by May 1, 2017.
  • Funds must be spent between June 1, 2017 and May 31, 2018.

For questions about the program, please contact:  karen-mason@uiowa.edu  or  janet-weaver@uiowa.edu and write TRAVEL FUND in the subject line.

 

Iowa Women’s Archives
The University of Iowa Libraries
125 West Washington Street
Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1420

319-335-5068

http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa/

lib-women@uiowa.edu

Posted in Uncategorized

Gallup Analytics – Trial ends 30 April 2017

Gallup Analytics is an online platform that provides subscribers with access to nearly a century of U.S. data and a decade of global tracking data known as the Gallup World Poll. Gallup Analytics allows subscribers to use this wealth of primary data in their work like never before. The online platform includes new data and historical trends at the country, state and U.S. city levels. All trends are easily searchable and exportable. Subscribers can view data by demographic categories, compare results across geographies to develop and report findings, including direct citations of Gallup’s work.

Please send additional comments to Brett Cloyd.

Posted in Uncategorized

Gallup Analytics – Trial ends 30 April 2017

Gallup Analytics is an online platform that provides subscribers with access to nearly a century of U.S. data and a decade of global tracking data known as the Gallup World Poll. Gallup Analytics allows subscribers to use this wealth of primary data in their work like never before. The online platform includes new data and historical trends at the country, state and U.S. city levels. All trends are easily searchable and exportable. Subscribers can view data by demographic categories, compare results across geographies to develop and report findings, including direct citations of Gallup’s work.

Please send additional comments to Brett Cloyd.

Posted in Uncategorized

Researchers – learn to maximize EndNote Desktop | workshop Thursday, March 30, 10-11am

For those already using Endnote, this class teaches you to maximize the tool. From exporting and importing to syncing and

Instructor Heather Healy, Clinical Education Librarian

sharing, this class will help you manage your own information seamlessly from desktop to mobile device and on the web.

You’ll also learn about the Endnote options for sharing, so you can collaborate effectively.

Thursday, March 30th, 10:00-11:00am (East Information Commons, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library)

Register online .

Posted in Uncategorized

Researchers – learn to maximize EndNote Desktop | workshop Thursday, March 30, 10-11am

For those already using Endnote, this class teaches you to maximize the tool. From exporting and importing to syncing and

Instructor Heather Healy, Clinical Education Librarian

sharing, this class will help you manage your own information seamlessly from desktop to mobile device and on the web.

You’ll also learn about the Endnote options for sharing, so you can collaborate effectively.

Thursday, March 30th, 10:00-11:00am (East Information Commons, 2nd Floor, Hardin Library)

Register online .

Posted in Uncategorized