I came over to see Pa’s and your sick Babe on wendnesday last and have been here ever since helping to do what I can

Joseph Culver Letter, October 23, 1863, Letter 2, Page 1Dear Brother

I have for some time been intending to write to you I came over to see Pa’s and your sick Babe on wendnesday last and have been here ever since helping to do what I can Pa. thinks he is a little better but is in a critical condition The disease has taking hold of his lungs and has to cough and spit very much your little Boy the very picture of your self is very sick Mary thinks all the time he is getting better and I would fain hope with her if I could but my hopes are all dark with fears I tell you this that you may prepare yourselfe if the Good Lord should se fit to take him from you It would be very hard for to give him up he is such a deare little fellow I was expecting much pleasure when Mary would be here but sickness has prevented it thus far I hope you enjoy good health which is one of Gods rich blessings It is Sunday evening and I cannot see very well so you will excuse mistakes Mary and I are both writing I expect she writes two words for my one We all love your Wife very much but I must tell you if you have changed your polaticks and gone with the Woolly heads as I have heard I am affraid I will have to quarl with you You should have seen our grand Mass Meting on thursday although the day was bad wee had a stronger turn out than the republicks had on saturday One man made a speech and said the war would not be over until we would all be made equil Is this what you are fiting for the very idie is disgusting If Gog had intended al to be one couller it would be so with out man trying to make it so Mr Mullin is still runing our mill Jacob and the children are well I will now have to close for my eyes are to weak to write any more hoping to hear from you son

May the lord bless and keep you from all danger is my prare

your Sister
Lizie

Ans Octo 23rd 1863

About Colleen Theisen

Outreach and Instruction Librarian. Lover of coffee, as well as 19th century photography, painting, tourism and print.
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