Unable to bear the suspense any longer, I telegraphed yesterday from Fountain Head

Joseph Culver Letter, January 10, 1863, Letter 2, Page 1

Mitchellsville, Tenn., Jany. 10th 1862[3]

My dear Wife

An opportunity offers to get a letter mailed at Louisville, & with the hope of letting you hear from me I eagerly embrace it.

Unable to bear the suspense any longer, I telegraphed yesterday from Fountain Head & this morning am awaiting your reply. Lieut. Smith remains there to bring up your answer to-day.

My health is as good as ever; in fact, I do not know that I ever enjoyed better health. We are still at Mitchellsville with excellent accommodations. E. H. Kenyon & Josiah Wood were buried yesterday. A. S. Bradford & John B. Lucas, all of our company, died in Bowling Green a few days ago.1

Hoping soon to hear from you, I remain, in haste,

Your affect. Husband
J. F. Culver

  1. Andrew J. Bradford, a 28-year-old Pontiac merchant, was mustered into service Sept. 8, 1862, as 1st sergeant of Company A, 129th Illinois Infantry. He died of chronic diarrhea on Jan. 2, 1863, in Hospital No. 4 at Bowling Green, Ky. John B. Lucas, a 20-year-old farmer, was mustered into service Sept. 8, 1862, as a private in Company A, 129th Illinois Infantry. Private Lucas died Jan. 2, 1862, of consumption in Hospital No. 4 at Bowling Green, Ky. Compiled Service Records of Union Soldiers, NA. []

About Colleen Theisen

Outreach and Instruction Librarian. Lover of coffee, as well as 19th century photography, painting, tourism and print.
This entry was posted in 1863, January. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.