New Exhibit in the John Martin Rare Book Room

Syphilis and Paul Ehrlich:

an Historical Case Study

Treponema_pallidum

Sahachiro Hata, working in Paul Erlich’s laboratory in 1908, discovered the arsenic compound arsphenamine (later known as Salvarsan), which was the first effective treatment for syphilis. The disease, which is transmitted either sexually or congenitally, begins as a superficial affliction but can lead to serious complications including seizures, aneurysms, and deformation in its later stages.

Syphilis has haunted global history and culture for centuries. Scientists debate its arrival in the Americas, with the greatest evidence supporting the Colombian hypothesis arguing that Christopher Columbus’ crewmen brought syphilis back with them from the Americas. Several famous historical figures including Franz Schubert are thought to have contracted the disease. It has been treated in art by Albrecht Dürer and in the femme fatale (“poison woman”) literature of 19th century writers such as John Keats. It was the subject of questionable ethical practices in the Tuskegee syphilis study of 1932.

Treponema pallidum (pictured), the bacterium which causes syphilis, was not discovered until 1905. This discovery paved the way for Hata’s cure. The disease currently affects an estimated 12 million people with 90% of those cases being in the developing world. Since penicillin became widely available in the 1940s, syphilis can be treated effectively with antibiotics.

durer170px-Tertiary_syphilis_headhata

Images: treponema pallidum; Dürer’s “Syphilitic Man” (1496); bust of deformation in a patient with gummatous syphilis; Hata and Ehrlich.

How to Determine Your Scholarly Impact: Learn HOW

Hardin Open Workshops is offering a hands-on class to teach participants how to use tools such as Ulrich’s, Journal Citation Reports, Web of Science, and Scopus to determine the impact that journals, articles, and authors have had on a particular field. Topics such as impact factors, Eigenfactors, and H-indices will also be discussed. HOW workshops are hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates and there will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, July 1, 10:30-11:30 am

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons classroom

Register here. For more information, contact our library staff at (319) 335-9151 or by email at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

[Image via delcon.gov.in]

 

Hardin Open Workshops: Systematic Reviews

This free, hands-on workshop for UI students and affiliates will focus on tips and techniques for carrying out a successful literature search in support of a systematic review. Topics will include techniques for developing search strategies, deciding which databases to search, and how to seek out grey literature for a given topic. There will also be discussion on selecting journals for hand searching, documenting search strategies, and saving and organizing references.

Our next sessions are:

Monday, June 23, 10-11 am

Tuesday, July 15, 10-11 am

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences EAST Information Commons classroom

Register here. Questions? Contact us by emailing lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or calling (319) 335-9151.

Components of a successful systematic review. [Image via navigatingeffectivetreatments.org.au]

Open Access: Policies, Publishers, and Predators

 

 

 

 

Open Access to scientific literature is one of the most hotly debated topics in scholarly publishing. This workshop will provide an overview of what scientists need to know when making their research open access. We will cover the basics of what we mean by open access, how open access relates to the NIH Public Access policy, open access journals in the biomedical sciences, predatory publishing scams, and best practices for evaluating your open access options.

 

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

 

Our next session is:

 

Monday, May 5, 2-3 pm

 

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons

 

Register here.

Patent Searching, Applications, and Trademarks

The purpose of this hands-on class is to introduce several resources found on the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office website that may be used to locate information on patents, trademarks, and patent applications. Google’s patent-searching feature will also be highlighted as a source for finding information on patents.

Our next session takes place:

Thursday, April 24, 3-4 pm

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences (EAST Information Commons classroom)

Register here or by calling 319-335-9151.

More resources available on the US Patent website.

 

An Introduction to Gene Variation Databases

This session provides an overview of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases that contain information on gene variations. Learn how to search for short genetic variations, genome structural variation studies, genotype/phenotype interaction studies and human variations of clinical significance. This class is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Thursday, April 10, 3-4 pm

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, Information Commons Classroom EAST

Register here. Contact us at 335-9151 or lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

For one-on-one instruction, see a librarian liaison.

“Sequence variations are mapped to the reference genome via BLAST®, using the data in the Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP).”

Image via ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Finding Evidence-Based Resources

This class will focus on creating a clinical question using PICO, the difference between publication types, and the different resources where one can find evidence based information. The class will also discuss the difference between searching Cochrane, PubMed, National Guideline Clearinghouse and UpToDate. This session will be hands-on and is free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, April 1, 9-10 am

Location: Hardin Library for the Health Sciences, WEST Information Commons classroom

Register here. Contact us with questions or concerns at (319) 335-9151 or by email at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu

Image via mclibrary.duke.edu

Open Access: Policies, Publishers, and Predators

Open Access to scientific literature is one of the most hotly debated topics in scholarly publishing. This workshop will provide an overview of what scientists need to know when making their research open access. We will cover the basics of what we mean by open access, how open access relates to the NIH Public Access policy, open access journals in the biomedical sciences, predatory publishing scams, and best practices for evaluating your open access options.

This session is hands-on and free for UI students and affiliates. There will be time for questions at the end.

Our next session is:

Monday, March 31, 2-3 pm

Location: Hardin Library EAST Information Commons

Register here.

Image via openscience.com

Questions? Contact us at lib-hardin@uiowa.edu or by calling (319) 335-9151.