Combo Category

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Finals To-Do List: Pet a Dog on Tue, May 7 and Mon, May 13 from 4-7p

Big dogs, small dogs and everything in between from the Therapy Dogs of Johnson County will be in the Main Library for a finals study break on Tuesday, May 7 and Monday, May 13 from 4-7 p.m. in the Main Library rm 2032 (conference room adjacent to large computer lab).

Therapy Dogs of Johnson County is a volunteer therapy dog group comprised of Delta Society registered Pet Partner teams. Their purpose is to bring the benefits of the human-animal bond to members of our community.

The last time the dogs visited the library, more than 80 people came to see them. One student commented, “this is one of the best study breaks I’ve ever had! It’s so relaxing to pet a dog and forget about the stress.”

 

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David McCartney selected to 2013 Archives Leadership Institute

In a competitive application process consisting of nearly 100 candidates, David McCartney has been selected as a participant in the 2013 Archives Leadership Institute.

David has been the University of Iowa Archivist in the Department of Special Collections and University Archives, University of Iowa Libraries, since January 2001.  He currently serves as chair of the CIC University Archivists Group and is membership chair of the Midwest Archives Conference. Previous archival positions have included contracting with History Associates, Inc., a records management evaluation position with the International Monetary Fund, a processing position with the National Public Broadcasting Archives and Library of American Broadcasting, and an archives technician position in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch of the National Archives and Records Administration.  David has a BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1979) and an MA in history and MLS in library science from the University of Maryland, College Park (1998).

Participants were selected for the program based on their leadership skills and potential, ability to influence policy and change within an organization and the archival field, commitment to the archival profession, career progress and history, organizational involvement, professional motivation and goals, a collaborative and innovative spirit and diversity and specialization within the profession.

ALI is a program funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration, and is being hosted at Luther College for the years 2013-15. The Archives Leadership Institute at Luther College (ALI@Luther) will provide advanced training for 25 emerging and innovative leaders, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the archival profession in practice, theory and attitude. To learn more about ALI@Luther see www.archivesleadershipinstitute.org.

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Learning Commons

These days anyone who comes to the library will be greeted with signs of construction…noise, hard hats and plywood. What!?!?!!, might you ask, is going on in the library? We are in the middle of constructing a new space for student success, interaction and learning! This fall the Main Library will be the home to the University of Iowa Learning Commons. Brought to you through the collaboration and support of ITS, the University of Iowa Libraries and the Provost’s office, the Learning Commons will support student success by providing collaborative study and work spaces, cutting edge technology, good coffee, even better social interaction and great service! To be kept in the know visit the Learning Commons website and don’t forget to LIKE the Learning Commons facebook page! Our Facebook page is up and running and we’ll not only provide you with updates on the construction of the Learning Commons but we’ll post fun and interesting articles, reviews, and websites that support your educational, personal and professional interests! See you there!

South LobbySouth LobbyFood for ThoughtFood for Thought

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Celebrating Pi Day with…

Pie, of course. Before you head out for Spring Break, stop by the UI Libraries on Thursday, March 14 for the celebration. Grab an apple tartlet at:

Art Library 9:15am & 1:45pm
Hardin Library for the Health Sciences 1:59pm until gone
Lichtenberger Engineering Library 1:59pm – 4:00pm
Main Library 1:59pm – 2:59pm
Pomerantz Business Library 10:00am until gone
Sciences Library 10:00am until gone

 

Think back to your high school geometry class; Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi is approximately 3.14159, but has been calculated to over two trillion digits, it goes on infinitely without repeating or becoming a pattern. Science would not exist without Pi.  Mathematics, statistics, engineering, geography, geology, computer science, etc. all rely on Pi.

More information about Pi can be found at Wolfram MathWorld: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Pi.html

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National History Day at the University of Iowa Libraries, February 15, 2013

The University of Iowa Libraries welcomes students from Roosevelt, Wilson, and Franklin Middle Schools for a National History Day workshop.

http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/nhd

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Elevator B in Main Library Out of Service

The northwest elevator (B) in the Main Library is currently out of service for levelling problems. It is being adjusted and will be operational again soon.

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Several Shades of Gray: A Different Kind of Research

Somewhere between an idea and a fully formed published work is the gray area of research in progress, raw data and “science right now” reports. This gray literature is often difficult to find, but provides details often omitted for the final published work and provides rapid release in new research areas.

Check out this guide to Gray/Grey Literature to bump up your research vocabulary: http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/graylit .

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Iowa Research Online: Where Your Work Lasts Forever

By Michael S. Lewis-Beck, F. Wendell Miller Distinguished Professor of Political Science

As emeritus faculty, I’ve spent my career researching and writing about politics. I published my first academic paper in 1974. Then as it is today, having your academic work cited is critical. But now the methods of scholarly publishing are very different. Academic publishers and academic libraries alike are faced with financial challenges of changing technologies and greater demand for information.

Over the course of my career I’ve authored or co-authored more than 200 articles and books in comparative elections, election forecasting, political economy and quantitative methodology. I can’t hazard a guess as to how many students, researchers and others have read my ideas in the past 40 years.

Then three years ago, 24 of my articles and book chapters were uploaded into Iowa Research Online (http://ir.uiowa.edu). Now each month, I receive notification of how many times an article has been downloaded. It’s exciting to see those numbers grow. But what might be even more exhilarating is the fact that my work will be available to students and researchers in perpetuity.

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The Practical Psychosomaticist on Open Access Week, October 22-28, 2012: Bring a Shovel

By James J. Amos, M.D.

When I was about 12 years old, I awoke to find a thick blanket of snow had covered our neighborhood. Initially I wanted to shovel a few walks for our elderly neighbors so they would have a path clear of ice and snow. Then I started thinking what I would charge my customers, imagining how much money I could make. As I calculated, I saw more and more dollar signs. Before long, the sun had gone down and it was too late to go out. No walks were shoveled and no money was made because I was too excited about the cash.

Thinking about open access publishing and copyright laws reminds me of that day in winter. Over the years I’ve had many opportunities to pick up that shovel to clear the path for others, but have been stymied by copyright. Recently a doctor from Poland requested a case report I’d published, but before I could send him the article I started worrying about who owned the copyright – me or the publisher. In the end I wasn’t at liberty to share the knowledge I’d gained to help another doctor improve the care he gives his patients.

And then there was the article I wrote that I wanted to share with all our residents. I couldn’t figure out how to without risking copyright infringement. I finally thumbtacked one of my complimentary copies to the residents’ bulletin board, which I think still has a clipping from the Eisenhower administration.

Finally, a colleague asked me if I would post his fine editorial that had been rejected by a journal on my open-access blog. I was more than happy to oblige, and I think the authors did me and my readers a remarkable service. I’m really shoveling now.

So to me, open access is all about sharing what I learn with other clinicians. The goal is improving patient care, in my book. That’s what my blog is all about. What you find there is free and open access. You can help.

Bring a shovel.

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OA Publishing Platforms with Don Share, Sr. Editor of Poetry Magazine, Oct 29 at 3pm

Open access publishing’s place in the humanities is uncertain at the moment, and knowledge of it will be important going forward in resolving inequitable relationships between presses and authors, journal vendors and libraries, and publishers and readers. The University of Iowa Libraries has invited  Don Share, senior editor of Poetry magazine, to talk about open access publishing platforms and contemporary humanities literature and scholarship.

Monday, October 29th at 3pm
Illinois Room of the Iowa Memorial Union
(Share will also be giving a poetry reading at Prairie Lights in the evening, at 7 pm.)

In 2002, Ruth Lilly, heiress to the Lilly pharmaceutical fortune, left Poetry magazine 100 million dollars upon her death, and among the things Poetry has done with the Lilly bequest is go open access. Each month the magazine publishes a print issue, as it has been doing for 100 years, and since 2003 it has simultaneously made each issue’s contents freely available on its website (see http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/). Don Share was one of the principle architects of this initiative, and he is in a unique position to discuss how literature and humanities scholarship function on an open access platform.

Don Share is Senior Editor of Poetry magazine. His books include Squandermania (Salt Publishing), Union (Zoo Press), Seneca in English (Penguin Classics), and most recently a new book of poems, Wishbone (Black Sparrow), and Bunting’s Persia (Flood Editions); he has also edited a critical edition of Bunting’s work for Faber and Faber. His translations of Miguel Hernández, collected in I Have Lots of Heart (Bloodaxe Books) were awarded the Times Literary Supplement Translation Prize and Premio Valle Inclán, and will appear in a revised edition from NYRB Classics. He has been Poetry Editor of Harvard Review and Partisan Review, Editor of Literary Imagination, and curator of poetry at Harvard University. With Christian Wiman, he co-hosts the monthly Poetry magazine podcast and has co-editedThe Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine (University of Chicago Press). For his work at Poetry he has earned two National Magazine Awards for Editorial Excellence.

Praise for Don Share’s poems:

“Don Share’s work is compressed as a haiku, intent as a tanka, witty as a sonnet, witless as a song, relentless as an expose, patter without pretension . . . his elegant poetry, exposed as a haiku, expansive as a renga, boisterous as a bridge, happy as Delmore Schwartz with Lou Reed and vice versa, vivacious as the living day . . . built out of attention, music and sight.” -David Shapiro “Share is one of the more gifted craftsmen we have writing in America today.” -Erin Belieu, Boston Review

“Few poets manage such dexterous and fresh music.” -Alice Fulton Praise for The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine (University of Chicago Press)

“If readers would like to sample the genius and diversity of American poetry in the last century, there’s no better place to start than The Open Door.” (World Literature Today)

“A high-wire anthology of electric resonance. . . . The editors then arranged these redefining poems by poets of the pantheon and poets overlooked, underrated, or new in pairings and sequences of thrilling contrapuntal dynamics. Wiman’s opening essay is titled ‘Mastery and Mystery,’ and those are, indeed, the forces at work here, inducing readers to marvel anew at the strange impulse to write poetry and the profound effort required to do it well.” (Booklist)

“With this collection, Share and Wiman want only to promote the art of poetry, something they do exceedingly well. Highly recommended.” (Library Journal, starred review )

“A wonderful anthology. . . . In many ways this is a wonderfully democratic anthology–to get in, you don’t have to be famous, you just need to be good.” (National Post, Canada)