Combo Category

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Women in Politics 2014: Historic & Current Perspectives

women in politics

Women in Politics 2014: Historic & Current Perspectives
Friday, April 18th, 2014, 8:15 AM to 5:00 PM
Old Capitol Museum Senate Chambers

The Louise Noun – Mary Louise Smith Iowa Women’s Archives was founded by two women who understood the critical importance of women participating in politics at all levels.

Join us for a day-long symposium that will examine why women do or do not run for political office, how they govern once elected, and documentation of the history of women in politics. The symposium will wrap up with a policy discussion and action steps.

The symposium is free and open to the public, but please register here, as space is limited.

The Women in Politics symposium is presented by the Public Policy Center in partnership with the Iowa Women’s Archives.

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Tamales and Juneteenth Cakes: Race, Recipes and Citizenship

Friday, March 28th, 2014 at 4:00p.m.
Iowa Women’s Archives
3rd Floor, Main Library
University of Iowa

Speakers:
Katherine Massoth, Ph.D. candidate
Susan Stanfield, Ph.D.

Tamales and Juneteenth Cakes

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Black Hawkeyes: The History of Black Students at the University of Iowa

Drawing on collections in the Iowa Women’s Archives, curator Kären Mason will discuss the history of African American women students at the University of Iowa on Tuesday, February 25th at the Iowa Memorial Union.

If you can’t make it to the talk, check out this wonderful resource: African American Women Students at the University of Iowa, 1910-1960.

black hawkeyes

Black Hawkeyes: The History of Black Students at the University of Iowa
Featuring Dr. Kären M. Mason, Curator of Iowa Women’s Archives
Tuesday, February 25, 12:30-2 PM
Penn State Room, Iowa Memorial Union
Presented by the Society of Black Graduate and Professional Students

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Women on the Chautauqua Circuit: Winsome Lasses and Ardent Advocates

This post by Kären Mason, Curator of the Iowa Women’s Archives, was originally written for Akashic Books.

Chautauqua was an eagerly anticipated event in towns across the United States in the early 20th century. Huge tents were erected and a variety of speakers, performances, and children’s activities took place over the week the Chautauqua was in town. Red Oak, Iowa even constructed a permanent Chautauqua Pavilion in 1907, which is still standing and reputed to be the largest covered pavilion west of the Mississippi.

Many women lectured or performed on the Chautauqua circuit. Some, like Marian Elliot Adams, the main character of Unmentionables, lectured on women’s reform issues. Women’s suffrage was a popular topic in the years leading up to 1920, when the 19th Amendment at long last gave women the vote. Chautauqua provided an important venue for reformers to reach audiences all across the country.

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Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) became an ardent suffragist while in high school and served as a field secretary for the National American Woman Suffrage Association after college. She advocated for suffrage and other reforms as a Chautauqua lecturer and was billed as “a fluent speaker sure to interest her audiences.” In 1916 she became the first woman elected to Congress, only possible because Montana had granted its women the right to vote in 1914.

While Jeannette Rankin and the fictional Marian Elliot Adams were very serious about promoting women’s issues on the Chautauqua stage, other women viewed Chautauqua as a lark. During the summer of 1926 Abbie McHenry (Romey) (1905-1994), a University of Iowa student, performed throughout the Midwest with five other students known as the Metropolitan Players. “Most of the audience turned its applause to Abbie Ann,” wrote a reporter in Greensburg, Indiana, charmed by the winsome lass he called “Amiable Abbie Ann.”  She recorded the summer’s travels in a diary and scrapbook, now in the Iowa Women’s Archives.

Abbie Ann McHenry’s sketch of the
platform manager in Kokomo, Indiana,
July 12, 1926.
 

Katharine La Sheck

For Katharine La Sheck (1891-1971), who had grown up in Iowa City, Iowa, Chautauqua offered a venue for showcasing her musical and theatrical talents. From 1911-1920 she performed with The College Girls and the Marigold Quartette, singing, acting, dancing, and playing musical instruments. Booked by the Redpath Chautauqua, the College Girls travelled to Panama in 1913 and 1914 to entertain Americans working on the canal, and performed on the cruise ships of the United Fruit Company Steamship Service.

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The Marigolds let their hair down

And have fun with some fellow travelers.

To learn more about Chautauqua, visit the website Traveling Culture: Circuit Chautauqua in the Twentieth Century.

 

Picture-7All photographs from the Iowa Women’s Archives and Department of Special Collections, University of Iowa Libraries.  Do not reproduce without permission. Contact the Iowa Women’s Archives at lib-women@uiowa.edu or the Special Collections Department at lib-spec@uiowa.edu.

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eras of emma: the emma goldman clinic through four decades

eras of emma:  the emma goldman clinic through four decades

Join us for a panel discussion featuring women who have been active in Iowa City’s feminist health clinic founded in 1973. The clinic had its origins in an abortion referral service started by Iowa City’s Women’s Liberation Front in 1971. The Emma Goldman Clinic for Women opened September 1, 1973 in a house at 715 North Dodge Street, just months after Roe v. Wade was decided by the United States Supreme Court. Initially focused on woman-centered health care, the Emma Goldman Clinic later expanded its mission to provide reproductive health care for men as well as women.
 
The panel will be moderated by Karen Kubby, former director of the clinic, and will include clinic founder Deborah Nye, first director Marilyn Cohen, current director Jennifer Price, and board member Jorie Slodki.
 
 
Friday, October 18, 2013
 
1:00-2:30 p.m.
 
Iowa Women’s Archives,
3rd floor, Main Library
The University of Iowa
 
  egc newsletter w Our Bodies  EGC n dodge house in snow
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Left: The first home of the Clinic, at 715 N. Dodge, Iowa City.
 
Right: The cover of a 1979 newsletter put out by the Clinic. Note the speculum in the back pocket and the copy of Our Bodies Ourselves on the chest of drawers. The newsletter was later renamed Emma’s Periodical Rag.
 
Both items are from the Emma Goldman Clinic records in the Iowa Women’s Archives.
 
 

 

 

 

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John Fry: What I Learned from Publishing an Edited Manuscript, Fri, Sept 20, 10-11am

Laura and Earle Smith

Laura & Earle Smith were barely out of college in 1913 when they left Moravia, Iowa, to try their hand at homesteading near Chugwater, Wyoming.   Laura recounted their adventures years later in her memoir Almost Pioneers.

Historian John Fry (UI PhD, 2002) came across Almost Pioneers while doing dissertation research in the Iowa Women’s Archives and later edited it for publication.  The trail to getting the book published was almost as bumpy as the Wyoming roads of 1913–but not quite.  John Fry will be in town on September 19-20, 2013, to speak about the book.

A PIONEER EVENING WITH JOHN FRY

Thursday, September 19, 7:00 p.m.

Coralville Public Library

WHAT I LEARNED FROM PUBLISHING AN EDITED MANUSCRIPT

Friday, September 20, 10:00 a.m.

Iowa Women’s Archives

(3rd floor, Main Library, The University of Iowa)

Please join us!

For information, call 335-5068.

iwa_fry

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About our exhibition “Pathways to Iowa”

 

Ruth Salzmann, Germany, c. 1938.

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the Iowa Women’s Archives, we have mounted an exhibit in the North Exhibition Hall of the University of Iowa’s Main Library. The inspiration for this exhibit came from the many visits made to the archives by families and friends of donors. Earlier this year, Sam Becker brought his grandchildren to the archives to look at the papers of their grandmother, Ruth Salzmann Becker. As they learned of her narrow escape from Nazi Germany in 1938, Ruth Salzmann’s story became one of the migration paths featured in the exhibit.

“Pathways to Iowa: Migration Stories from the Iowa Women’s Archives” seeks to acknowledge the donors of the precious letters, photos, diaries, and memoirs that make up the collections preserved in the Iowa Women’s Archives. At the same time, it seeks to re-frame our understanding of Iowa history. Beginning with the migration path of Iowa’s first people, the Meskwaki, it integrates the familiar story of European settlement with a lesser known history of African American and Mexican migration in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

LULAC women share their stories, Davenport, 2007.

For the past seven years, through its  Mujeres Latinas Project, the archives has worked to preserve the early history of Mexican migration to Iowa. We chose to highlight these materials in this exhibit because it is a history that has been hidden for too long. The Iowa Women’s Archives wishes to thank all of those who shared their stories with the Iowa Women’s Archives. A special thanks goes to the members of the Davenport League of United Latin American Citizens – LULAC Council 10 – who have done so much to preserve and bring to light the rich history of Iowa Latinas, their families, and organizations, and donated their records to the Iowa Women’s Archives so that others could learn this important history.