Lectures and Discussions Category

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Learn to search for patent information with our upcoming open workshop @Hardin Library

The purpose of this hands-on class is to introduce several resources found on the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office website that may be used to locate information on patents, trademarks, and patent applications. Google’s patent-searching feature will also be highlighted as a source for finding information on patents.

Our next session takes place:

Monday, November 4, 11 am-12 pm (Location: East Information Commons, Hardin Library fro the Health Sciences)

Register here or by calling 319-335-9151.

More resources available on the US Patent website.

 

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Learn the Basics of EndNote with our Open Workshop

EndNote is a reference management tool that helps you to easily gather together your references in one place, organize them, and then insert them into papers and format them in a style of your choosing. This session will walk you through the basics of using EndNote to collect and format your citations. The class will be hands-on and there will be time for questions at the end.

Tuesday, October 22 from 9-10 am (Location: East Information Commons)
Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.
No time for a class? See our EndNote tutorial here.
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Find Evidence-Based Resources with our upcoming workshop

This class will focus on creating a clinical question using PICO, the difference between publication types, and the different resources where one can find evidence based information. The class will also discuss the difference between searching Cochrane, PubMed, National Guideline Clearinghouse and UpToDate.

Our next session is
Wednesday, October 23rd, 11 am-12 pm (Location: East Information Commons)
Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.
No time for class?  Ask your librarian for a private consult!
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Create a bibliography and more with our free RefWorks workshop

Want some help writing your next paper? Come to Hardin Library’s class on RefWorks and learn about this web-based bibliographic management tool. In this class, you’ll learn how to import citations from PubMed, how to enter references, how to create a quick bibliography, and how to add end and foot notes to your papers (Write-n-Cite). RefWorks is available for free to anyone affiliated with UI and can also be accessed remotely. Sign up to learn more about RefWorks and save yourself a lot of time next time you have to write a paper.

Our next session is
Wednesday, October 16, 2:30-3:30 pm (Location: East Information Commons)
Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.
No time for class?  Ask your librarian for a private consult!
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Check out our Keeping Current workshop

Want to know as soon as an exciting new article is published? Tired of skimming the websites or paper copies of multiple journals to see what is in the new issue? This hands-on session will show you how to create a single destination for information from your favorite journals, databases, websites and blogs using RSS feeds and auto-alerts.

Our next session is

Tuesday, October 15, 1-2 pm (Location: East Information Commons)

Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.

Need one-on-one instruction? Request an individual session here.

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Improve your PubMed search results with our workshop Monday, October 14

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to the medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session:

Monday, October 14  3-4 pm (Location: East Information Commons, Hardin Library)

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

No time for a class? Check out our PubMed tutorial.

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Twitter for the Health Sciences

Twitter is more than just a social media tool. It has developed into a vibrant real-time information network used by health care providers, scholars, and scientists. Come to this hands-on session to learn the basics of twitter, advanced techniques such as searching, and examples of its use in the Health Sciences.

Our next session:

Monday, October 14  10-11 am (Location: East Information Commons, Hardin Library)

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

No time for a class? Contact your librarian for individual instruction.

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Open Access Week : October 21-27

Open Access makes scholarship more accessible.  Celebrate Open Access Week with our activities including a lecture and panel discussion:  http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/openaccess/ 

What is Open Access?

Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder. OA is entirely compatible with peer review, and all the major OA initiatives for scientific and scholarly literature insist on its importance. Just as authors of journal articles donate their labor, so do most journal editors and referees participating in peer review. OA literature is not free to produce, even if it is less expensive to produce than conventionally published literature. The question is not whether scholarly literature can be made costless, but whether there are better ways to pay the bills than by charging readers and creating access barriers.
(from A Very Brief Introduction to OA by Peter Suber)

How to Get Help With Fees

To encourage the University community to publish their research in Open Access platforms, the Office of the Provost and University Libraries have established a fund to pay the processing fees related to open access publishing.

What if I have more questions?

Contact Janna Lawrence, Assistant Director, Hardin Library.

Does Iowa have an institutional repository?

Yes:  Iowa Research Online.

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2,000 Year History of Scabies

Russell W. Currier, past president of the American Veterinary Medical History Society will speak on:

“2,000 Year History of Scabies:  From Humoral Beliefs to Contagion to Modern Understanding”

Thursday, October 24, 2013, 5:30-6:30
Room 401
Univ. of Iowa Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

The transition from Hippocrates’ humors and Galenic dogma to microscopic causes of illness was a long and distressing experience delaying for centuries the concept of contagion.  Manifestations of scabies infestations were attributed erroneously to systemic phenomena, even digestive disorders. This lecture will present a 2,000 year review of this  wholly human parasite that spread in ‘deep time’ to numerous animal species as variant subspecies.

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Don’t Procrastinate– Get Organized with Our Workshop Tomorrow!

Are PDFs scattered all over your computer with names that you cannot pronounce? Want to create an organized, clearly named, and Internet-accessible personal library? This hands-on session will show you how using free tools such as Mendeley and Dropbox as well as commercial tools such as EndNote and RefWorks.  Attendees are encouraged to bring a selection of PDFs with them.

Our next session is:

Tuesday, October 8th, 10-11 am (Location: East Information Commons)

Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.

No time for a class?  Contact your librarian for a personalized session!