Fun Category

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Philanthropy Day: Hardin Library construction funded through gifts and NIH grant

Hardin at opening 1974

1974

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences opened in 1974.  The building was designed by Walter Netsch, and was  funded by $1.4 million in  gifts and a National Institute of Health grant for $2.3 million.

The John Martin Rare Book Room was started by a generous donation of books and funding from Dr. John Martin.

See History of the Hardin Library for more pictures and information about the library.

If you would like to donate to our library, you may do so online.

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National Poetry Month @HardinLib

npm2013_poster_540

April is National Poetry Month.  Poems on many subjects have been posted throughout the library for you to enjoy.  This year the poems were selected by Hardin Library student employees.

 

 

 

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Women’s History Month : Emma L. Miller, first female employee of VA

Mrs. Emma L. Miller was the first woman employee in Veterans Health Administration.  She was appointed as the first matron at the Central Branch NHDVS in Dayton (now Dayton VAMC) in the fall of 1867.

Prior to her appointment, she worked with the U.S. Sanitary Commission at their Cleveland and Cincinnati branches  during the Civil War and was appointed as matron of the Ohio Soldiers Home in Columbus in October 1865.

When the U.S. government established a branch of the National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (later named National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers) it initially took over the state home in Columbus, but later selected a site in Dayton as its permanent location.  Miss Miller brought 16 disabled “boys in blue” with her to the new Dayton site in the fall of 1867.

She helped at the hospital, oversaw laundry operations, ran the Home’s hotel, and was eventually elevated to Superintendent of the general depot, where much of the clothing and supplies for all of the National Homes were manufactured and distributed–a rare position to held by a woman, in those days. In the 1880 annual report, she reported that the “Matron’s Department” had washed, pressed, repaired, and reissued over 1,703,648 pieces of laundry and linens, averaging 32,762 pieces per week.  Worn out linens were condemned, then washed and reused in the hospital as bandages and dressings, in the engineer’s department as wipers and wrappings for steam-pipes, and as wipers and mops elsewhere. Emma Miller was a fixture at the Dayton home for nearly 50 years and she lived on-site. She spent her entire post-Civil War life at the home and grew old with many of the men whom she originally cared for during the war. Emma Miller died in her quarters at the National Home on January 18, 1914 and is buried in the Dayton National Cemetery (formerly the National Home’s cemetery).

*Information provided by the Veterans Health Administration’s History Office.

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Free coffee for finals Friday December 7 – Friday December 14

Need a little fuel for finals?  We’ve got it!

The Hardin Library for the Health Sciences will be serving free coffee for finals week, beginning this Friday at 6pm.  Finals coffee is sponsored by Linda Walton, Associate University Librarian for the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences & Branch Libraries.

picture of coffee and book

photo by Gyrus at flickr

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Take a study break with Just Dance 4

Feel like you need a little break?picture of just dance

Just Dance 4  for Wii is set up in the Information Commons East, 2nd floor for finals week.

Play with your friends, yourself, or ask a Hardin staff member to play with you!

 

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Celebrate Iowa connection to Silent Spring and sustainability

My Friend, Rachel Carson: Shirley Briggs and the Iowa Connection to Silent Spring

Rachel CarsonFifty years ago, Rachel Carson published Silent Spring, a lucid and compelling book about how DDT and other pesticides were damaging the environment and human health. The book called for a change in the way humankind viewed the natural world and became an inspiration for the environmental movement. One of Carson’s staunchest advocates and closest friends was Iowan Shirley Briggs, who met Carson when they worked together at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the 1940s.

To recognize this Iowa connection to Silent Spring  the University of Iowa Libraries and Office of Sustainability are presenting a symposium and exhibition opening, Thursday, Nov. 15, inspired by the extensive collection of Briggs’ diaries, letters, photos and artwork in the Iowa Women’s Archives.

 A Sense of Wonder, a short film about the last days of Rachel Carson as she struggled with cancer, will be shown from noon to 1 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 14 at the Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn Street.

The symposium begins at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 15 in Phillips Hall Auditorium (100 PH), followed by an opening reception in the UI Sciences Library, where an exhibit of Briggs’ photos, writings, art work and memorabilia will be on display through Jan. 7.

See our library guide at http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/carson-briggs for more information on Rachel Carson, Shirley Briggs, and Silent Spring.

poster of information

All events are free and open to the public.

 

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What is Open Access?

Confused about Open Access?  Check out this PHD Comic to get a good overview of what is open access and how it can benefit you.

(no image? copy and paste the link below)

http://www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1533

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Happy Homecoming!

Hardin Library staff would like to wish everyone a safe and happy homecoming this weekend. We’re showing our spirit, today.

From left to right, top: Kelly Thormodson, Shane Wallace, Cassie Reed-Thureson, Chris Childs, Amy Blevins, Kerry Minner.

From left to right, bottom: Sarah Andrews, Xiaomei Gu, Linda Walton, Janna Lawrence

 

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Reception to honor Deberg on Wednesday

image of Jennifer DebergJennifer Deberg, Clinical Education Librarian for the College of Nursing, has earned the Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services Professional Development Award.

Please join us for a celebration on Wednesday, September 26 from 3-4:30pm in the Hardin Library Conference Room 401.

Jennifer was nominated by both The College of Nursing and the Department of Nursing at University of Iowa Healthcare.  Jennifer provides one-on-one consults and course integrated training for students, faculty, and staff in these departments as well as other departments.

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Iowa City Book Festival this weekend

image Iowa City book festivalThe Iowa City Book Festival is a celebration of books, reading and writing presented by The University of Iowa Libraries.  Most of the book festival programs are free and many are appropriate for children.

Pick up a guide to the festival at the Hardin Library or see list of events online (http://www.iowacitybookfestival.org/schedule/).

 

Programming about illness or medicine:

Saturday, July 14, 11:00am
Lichtenberger Engineering Library, Seamans Center
A Pocket Full of Posies, My Life with Cancer by Deborah Leistikow
Cancer as a comedy? Discover how humor trumps crying with illuminating self-reflection, candid treatment descriptions, tenacious optimism and smiles.

Saturday, July 14, 11:30am
Seamans Center Commons
Carol Scott-Conner and Mary Jane Nealon have both seen the inside of a hosptial room as medical caregivers.  Through fiction and nonfiction they share stories of sickness and health.’

Saturday, July 14, 2:00pm
Macbride Auditorium
Mary O’Connell introduces Sandanista Jones in her first novel, The Sharp Time.  Sandinista is an injured teen who experiences grief and loneliness during one week of her life.

Sunday, July 15, 11AM
321 North Hall/Wild Bill’s Coffee Shop
Laura Moriarty, author of The Chaperone, shares how her background in social work informs her fiction writing.