Electronic Journals Category

0

Learn to Import Citations from PubMed with our RefWorks Open Workshop

Want some help writing your next paper? Come to Hardin Library’s class on RefWorks and learn about this web-based  bibliographic management tool. In this class, you’ll learn how to import citations from PubMed, enter references, create a quick bibliography, and add end and footnotes using Write-n-Cite. Sign up to learn more about RefWorks and save time on your next paper.

Our next session is:

Monday, December 9 from 10-11 am

Register online here or by calling 335-9151.
No time for class?  Ask your librarian for a private consult!

refworks graphic

0

Find Relevant Articles Fast with PubMed Express

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This 30-minute session will show you how to find relevant articles fast using some of the basic features in PubMed.

Our next session takes place:

Wednesday, December 4 from 1-1:30 pm

Location: Hardin Library East Information Commons

Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.
No time for class?  Take a look at our PubMed tutorial.
0

Create a quick bibliography with our RefWorks workshop

Want some help writing your next paper? Stop by Hardin’s class on RefWorks and learn more about this web-based bibliographic management tool. In this class, you’ll learn how to import citations from PubMed, enter references, create a quick bibliography, and use Write-n-Cite to add end and footnotes. Sign up to learn more about Refworks and save time on your next paper.

Our next session:

Wednesday, November 13 from 1-2 pm (Location: Hardin Library East Information Commons)

Register online here or by calling 319-335-9151.
No time for class?  Ask your librarian for a private consult!
refworks graphic
0

Find relevant articles fast with our PubMed Express session this Tuesday!

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This 30-minute session will show you how to find relevant articles fast using some of the basic features in PubMed.

Our next session:

Tuesday, November 12  12-12:30 pm (Location: East Information Commons, Hardin Library)

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

No time for a class? Check out our PubMed tutorial.

0

Improve Your Research Skills with PubMed: Going Beyond the Basics

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine’s index to medical literature and includes over 22 million bibliographic citations in life sciences. This one-hour session will show you how to improve your search results by using subject headings (MeSH) and advanced keyword searching techniques.

Our next session takes place:

Wednesday, November 20 from 10-11 am (Location: Hardin Library East Information Commons)

Register online or by calling 319-335-9151.

Too busy for class? Check out our PubMed tutorial.

 

0

Learn to search for patent information with our upcoming open workshop @Hardin Library

The purpose of this hands-on class is to introduce several resources found on the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office website that may be used to locate information on patents, trademarks, and patent applications. Google’s patent-searching feature will also be highlighted as a source for finding information on patents.

Our next session takes place:

Monday, November 4, 11 am-12 pm (Location: East Information Commons, Hardin Library fro the Health Sciences)

Register here or by calling 319-335-9151.

More resources available on the US Patent website.

 

0

Archives Journals changing names as of January 1, 2013

Effective on January 1, 2013, all of the Archives Journals will be official renamed:

  • JAMA Dermatology
  • JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
  • JAMA Neurology
  • JAMA Ophthalmology
  • JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
  • JAMA Pediatrics
  • JAMA Psychiatry
  • JAMA Surgery

For more information, please see this article from JAMA.

0

How much does the library pay for journals?

A boycott of Elsevier journals has been growing to show opposition to their support of the Research Works Act and their 36% profits (see Research Bought, Then Paid For – an Op-Ed in the New York Times, Elsevier boycott gains momentum, Elsevier responds to the boycott, and “Of goats and headaches”–The Economist on journal publishing for previous posts on these issues ).

There have also been prominent articles about the lack of public accessibility of academic research, such as “Locked in the Ivory Tower: Why JSTOR Imprisons Academic Research”  which appeared in The Atlantic on Jan 20, 2012. This particular article points to JSTOR as an example of the “broken economics of academic publishing”. Nancy Sims from University of Minnesota wrote “Academic publishing is full of problems; lets get them right” which is a good response to the Atlantic article, correcting some of the specifics.

Since that time, we have seen faculty taking note of the cost of some e-journal packages and collections of titles, most notably the $2.9 million figure from Purdue when that institution came close to cancelling their Elsevier package in December. (“Purdue re-signs contract for online scholastic access” )

In order to keep Iowa faculty informed about the cost of journals from a variety of sources, we offer these figures for University of Iowa costs from FY 2011:

Publisher Cost # of Titles
Elsevier $       1,641,530

2095

Wiley/Blackwell $           868,031

1304

Springer $           607,540

400

Sage $           243,647

608

JSTOR $             97,602

2319

Cambridge UP $             43,940

145

Project Muse $             33,210

500

Oxford UP $             21,313

250

Please note that the JSTOR figure is for back content (the so-called moving wall), not current issues.

The following chart offers another way to view the relative size shares of the pie different publishers receive from our acquisitions budget (the denominator for these percentages is total spending on e-journals). The data is slightly older than that used above.

Article written by Wendy Robertson, Digital Scholarship Librarian.  Originally published here:  http://blog.lib.uiowa.edu/transitions/?p=720.

0

New UI journal: Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Iowa would like to announce the inaugural issue of Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology, a new journal.

The journal is peer-reviewed, and with the goal of becoming listed in PubMed.  Proceedings in Obstetrics and Gynecology will be published as an online journal quarterly and is supported by the University of Iowa Libraries.  In the first issue you will find information about the clinical and research divisions in the Department, recent publications from faculty members, full length articles, and interesting clinical cases.

You can locate the journal at http://ir.uiowa.edu/pog/. If you would like to be on the distribution list to be notified when future issues are released, please email Proceedings-in-OBGYN@uiowa.edu.

0

Open Access Publishing in the Health Sciences

Editor’s Note: Throughout Open Access Week (Oct 19-23), the UI Libraries will be sharing the views of our UI colleagues on the topic of open access.

by Dr. William Sivitz, Professor of Internal Medicine

I recently published an article in PlosOne (Mitochondrial Targeted Coenzyme Q, Superoxide, and Fuel Selectivity in Endothelial Cells by Brian D. Fink, Yunxia O’Malley, Brian L. Dake, Nicolette C. Ross, Thomas E. Prisinzano, and William I. Sivitz). I found the process straightforward and faster than most other journals. The peer review was thorough but fair. I hope to see this used more frequently.

 

by Dr. Michael Knudson, Association Professor of Pathology

We published in Plos One and found it a very satisfying experience.  Quick, insightful reviews, no charge for color figures and no copyright forms to sign.

The journal allows readers to provide feedback and ratings of each article.  I would recommend Open Access to all.