Iowa Digital Library Category

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The poetry of pudding

From the Szathmary cookbook collection, a rhyming recipe from an 1860 English cookbook:

A Paradise pudding

English cookbook, 1860 | Szathmary Culinary Manuscripts and Cookbooks

English cookbook, 1860 | Szathmary Culinary Manuscripts and Cookbooks

If you’d have a good pudding pray mind what you’re taught

Take two pen ‘sworth of eggs when they’re twelve for a groat

Take of the same fruit which Eve once did cozen

When pared & well chopp’d at least half a dozen

Six ounces of bread (let your maid eat the crust)

The crumb must be grated as fine as fine dust

Six ounces of sugar won’t make it too sweet

Some salt & some nutmeg to make it complete

To these you may add if you are willing and handy

Some good lemon peel & a large glass of brandy

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The Wilder Life

To celebrate Laura Ingalls Wilder’s birthday — she was born on this day in 1867 — we couldn’t decide whether to churn butter or make a corn-cob doll. So instead we chose to listen to this archived reading by Wendy McClure, and enjoy vicariously her adventures in obsessive Little House on the Prairie fandom.

Wendy McClure: The Wilder Life. Images: wendymcclure.net

Wendy McClure: The Wilder Life. Images: wendymcclure.net

Wendy McClure reading, Live from Prairie Lights, April 19, 2011 | Virtural Writing University | Iowa Digital Library
Wendy McClure reads from The Wilder Life: My Adventures in the Lost World of Little House on the Prairie. After her mother’s death, Wendy McClure rediscovered Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books. Fascinated with the lifestyle the books evoke, she began a journey to discover Wilder and the culture and the tourism industry that have sprung up around her. This incredibly engaging book chronicles her research into Wilder’s life, literary controversies, and the social history that allowed the books to take on a life of their own. Little House on the Prairie fans will love following the journey of one of their own. Wendy McClure has been writing about her obsessions both online and in print for nearly a decade. In addition to her 2005 memoir, I’m Not the New Me, she is a columnist for BUST Magazine and has contributed to The New York Times Magazine. McClure holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She lives in Chicago, where she is senior editor at the children’s book publisher Albert Whitman & Company.

Browse all readings at the Iowa Digital Library’s Virtual Writing University Archive

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Driven by love

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

These transportation-themed (and occasionally offensive, by today’s standards) cards are among the several dozen vintage valentines now featured on our Iowa Digital Library Pinterest site.

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

Vintage valentines: Iowa Digital Library on Pinterest

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A good beginning

Perhaps your New Year’s resolutions include a self-documentation project, like more frequent updates on Facebook, Twitter, or even a good old-fashioned diary? For inspiration, we present Iowa Byington Reed (1851-1936), an Iowa City native, teacher, seamstress, and housewife who wrote daily diary entries covering her life from age twenty to just a few weeks before her death at age eighty-four. Now part of the holdings of the Iowa Women’s Archives, all of Byington Reed’s diaries were recently digitized and added to Iowa Digital Library.

Excerpted below are just a few of her January 1sts, with transcriptions courtesy of our volunteers at DIY History.

Diary entry, Jan. 1, 1872 | Iowa Byington Reed Diaries

Diary entry, Jan. 1, 1872 | Iowa Byington Reed Diaries

Jan. 1, 1872: Did not teach today nor did we have company as we usually do. It was the busiest day I have put in for some time if I only work so well all the year I will accomplish wonders. But according to rule a good beginning makes a bad ending hope I will prove an exception… Mr Huebner called a few minutes this afternoon enjoyed his call very much. In the evening sewed on the waist of my black dress, retired early as I was suffering with a severe cold Recieved from Mr McSparen the sum of $26.00 my wages for the first month I taught Thus ends the first day of the week and the first day of the new year.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/172/14612

1874: What a lovely day for the first of the new year. As soon as Hattie and I got the morning work done We got into the buggy and took a drive over to the depot to see if Winnie had come… We got Emma Middleton in the buggy with us and went down to Jim McCallister’s. We found Grandma and Grandpa there. Aunt Mary had an excellent dinner and we enjoyed our visit very much indeed. Came home in good season. I sewed all the evening. Altogether I was well pleased with the manner in which I spent the day. We heard from Father today. I never saw so pleasant a January 1st it was a remarkable winter day. Emma came home with us to stay all night.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/163/13279

1875: …I helped Aunty a little and spent the day very pleasantly. The weather was not very pleasant, I thought a great many times today of what a beautiful day last New Years was and how Hattie and I enjoyed ourselves driving around town and spending the day at Uncle Jim McCallisters. In the evening I wrote a little and looked over my old diary and indulged in a retrospective view of the past year. I most sincerely hope that I will not know some of the sorrow this year I did last.  I find it very lonesome without Jennie. I wrote a note to Clarence tonight and wrapped up his scarf ready to take to Lewis tomorrow.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/146/10299

1876: Rain. Who ever saw the like on New Years day. How fashionable we were today. Breakfast at nine, dinner at three, and supper at nine. Hattie and I worked all of the day and part of the night making a pair of lamp mats for the parlor. We played a few games of cards in the evening. Mr. Bently and I playing partners against Rob and Hattie. This surely has not been a pleasant new year But with me a happy and comfortable one.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/148/10569

1899: It was late when we got up this morning and after doing up the work went up to the cemetery  It was a very cold forenoon  We all but Lee ate dinner down at Otts. Will and I started home early in the afternoon. We had things all put away and supper ready by six oclock. I read in the evening. What I wonder is in store for us this year.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/167/13781

1912: The first day of the week and the year and it is 40 years today since I began keeping diary.  This was a good sharp winter day.  The folks with [Elvis?] Anderson came out for dinner.  [Lorie Folty?] was with them of course.  I got along nicely with my dinner and they seemed to enjoy it.  The girls did not go home till 5:15.  After that i washed the dinner dishes and got us some supper.  May we be spared the sorrow in this year to come we passed through in the last.
http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe/scripto/transcribe/159/12535

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IDL wishes you HH

Grant Wood's Christmas card, 1924 | Figge Art Museum Grant Wood Digital Collection

Grant Wood’s Christmas card, 1924 | Figge Art Museum Grant Wood Digital Collection

Happy holidays from the Iowa Digital Library!

Christmas at the UI Children's Hospital, 1921 | Iowa City Town and Campus Scenes

Christmas at the UI Children’s Hospital, 1921 | Iowa City Town and Campus Scenes

'Pass, friend,' 1941 | Editorial Cartoons of Ding Darling

‘Pass, friend,’ 1941 | Editorial Cartoons of Ding Darling

Ghosts of Christmas blog entries past:

A Civil War Christmas letter

A Civil War Christmas letter

Around the Christmas tree

Around the Christmas tree

A Child Welfare Christmas

A Child Welfare Christmas

Flurries of activity

Flurries of activity

 

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Food for body and spirit

James Doak's The Art of Cookery

James Doak’s The Art of Cookery

On the last page of James Doak’s 1760s Art of cookery, following recipes for ketchup and pickled mushrooms, we find what appears to be a catalog of his library, an impressive collection for the time. He lists the classics: Shakespeare, Pope, Cato, Milton, the Bible, as well as some intriguing titles: Whytt on Lyme water, and A Conversation on the Plurality of Worlds, a French Enlightenment discourse on the Copernican world view. Doak’s book is one of the manuscript cookbooks waiting to be transcribed on our DIY History website:  http://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu/transcribe

Please delve in and discover what other gems lie between the interestingly stained pages!

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Nile Kinnick Collection now online

Nile Kinnick Collection

Each fall tens of thousands of people cheer their beloved Iowa Hawkeyes in the football stadium that bears the name of Iowa’s only Heisman trophy winner: Nile Kinnick Jr. Standing only 5’8” tall, Kinnick was a giant among men, a champion athlete and scholar who gave his life for his country serving in World War II.

A new digital collection from the University of Iowa Libraries bringing together letters, newspaper clippings, and photos of Nile Kinnick is now online: digital.lib.uiowa.edu/kinnick. These materials tell the story of one of the UI’s greatest football legends.

Included in the collection is the text of Kinnick’s Heisman trophy acceptance speech. Whitney Martin, a reporter covering the Heisman ceremony for the Associated Press, described the scene as “several hundred men and women rose and cheered and whistled…You realized the ovation wasn’t alone for Nile Kinnick, the outstanding college football player of the year. It was also for Nile Kinnick, typifying everything admirable in American youth.”

The Nile Kinnick Collection is the latest addition to the Iowa Digital Library, which features more than half a million digital objects created from the holdings of the UI Libraries and its campus partners. Included are illuminated manuscripts, historical maps, fine art, political cartoons, scholarly works, audio and video recordings, and more.

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Nothing new under the sun: the drought of 1863

From our Civil War Diaries and Letters collection comes a letter from Sam Clark, farming in southern Iowa, to his love interest Tillie in Illinois:

Unless we have rain and that very soon the corn crop in this state will be almost a complete failure … The last rain that we have had to amount to any thing or wet the ground more than to lay the dust fell last April. So you may judge for your self whether we need any rain in Iowa. The women say if we do not get rain that there will be no “inyens nor beens, nor potatoes,” if that be so we will have to live without the vegetable matter, over which they do the principal superintending – the women I believe generally “boss” the affairs in the garden, and I suppose they have a right so to do …

Esther eating corn, early 1900s | Iowa Women's Archives Images

Esther eating corn, early 1900s | Iowa Women's Archives Images

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Historic heat wave

"It's always the univited guests...," editorial cartoon by Ding Darling, Aug. 27, 1936 | Editorial Cartoons of J.N. "Ding" Darling

“It’s always the uninvited guests…,” editorial cartoon by Ding Darling, Aug. 27, 1936 | Editorial Cartoons of J.N. “Ding” Darling

Recent temperatures in the 100s here in Iowa have us cowering in our climate-controlled offices, but a browse through past heat waves documented in the Iowa Digital Library helps to put things in perspective. Worst of these was the summer of 1936, the hottest on record, marking the end of the Dust Bowl years. A July 16th Daily Iowan story  put heat-related fatalities in those pre-air-conditioning days at 3,500; according to government figures, the death toll rose to 5,000 by the end of the summer.

Despite the heat, some Iowa Citians still found the strength to indulge their intellectual curiosity, as shown in this D.I. investigation of whether it really is hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk. (Answer: Not really.)

"Will it or won't it?" The Daily Iowan, July 10, 1936 | The Daily Iowan Historic Newspapers

“Will it or won’t it?” The Daily Iowan, July 10, 1936 | The Daily Iowan Historic Newspapers

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Mail call

In a twelve-page letter from soldier Sam Clark to his sweetheart Tillie Wise back in Iowa, a paean to the power of correspondence to lift the spirits of the troops:
“I do think it does Soldiers the most good of any other race of beings to get letters. If you could only see them gather around when the camp mail is being distributed, each one trying to be the nearest to the mail man whoes province it is to distribute, and should any of them happen to receive more than one letter on the same day it is more than the mind can digest, until the excitement produces a kind of reaction on their mental digestive organs. It seems to me that I can go through camp after the mail has been disbursed, and by the fallen chops and broad grins, I think I can point out nearly every man who has been fortunate enough to receive a “friendly scratch” from the dear ones left behind. Soldiers are with letters

Wise-Clark correspondence, July 11, 1864 | Civil War Diaries and Letters

Wise-Clark correspondence, July 11, 1864 | Civil War Diaries and Letters

like gold seekers “If an ounce of diamonds were to fall into their hand every day they would hold out the other hand just as eager for more.” I think that will apply to the Soldiers in regard to receiving letters