About Author: Mark Anderson

Posts by Mark Anderson

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Short Fiction Award

Barbara Hamby’s “Lester Higata’s 20th Century” was announced as the winner of the 2010 John Simmons Short Fiction Award winner from the University of Iowa Press.  The John Simmons Short Fiction Award — named for the first director of the University of Iowa Press — was created in 1988 to complement the existing Iowa Short Fiction Award.

Winning entries from 1970-2000 can be freely accessed through Iowa Research Online, the University of Iowa’s Institutional Repository.  Books by more recent award winners can be purchased from the University of Iowa Press.

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Homecoming 1930-2010

Take a trip back 80 years with a few homecoming memories from the Iowa Digital Library

psu1 

Iowa-Penn State homecoming football game, Nov. 15, 1930


psu2 

Iowa-Penn State homecoming football game, Nov. 15, 1930


 

 corn-monument 

Homecoming corn monument, 1930


 

homecoming-pin 

Homecoming pin, 1930


 

 hawk-pin 

Cheerleader placing pin on hawk during Homecoming festivities, Nov. 3, 1956


 

…but homecoming wouldn’t be complete without the parade

parade 

Homecoming parade on Clinton Street, 1940s

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Ephemeral bovine

It’s helpful for Digital Library Services to examine usage statistics about the Iowa Digital Library to see where site traffic comes from and which collections have more or less hits.  Sometimes, it’s just fun to see outside links pointing to unexpected places.  The Springer Printing Ephemera is a digital collectiton containing samples from various printing companies, calendars and political clippings amassed by Iowa City printer John Springer.

Springer Printing Ephemera Digital Collection

The Libraries are adding each and every piece in the collection, so that it will be a comprehensive surrogate for the archival collection, and a valuable tool for studying the history of printing and typography.  Although not a heavily publicized collection, we noticed that the Design Observer Group picked an image from the Springer Collection for their daily selection of… “things lost on the fringes…ordinary, odd, beautiful things. Esoteric images, old diagrams, typography, cartography — visions of a once promising but now extinct future.”

Seymour cream cowAnd this image of a cow, advertising cream-colored paper from the Seymour Company of New York, made the cut.

–Mark Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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A new view for IDL

We’ve added a new viewer to the item interface for the Iowa Digital LibrarydmMonicle is an image viewer that makes it easier to see detailed pictures with its click-and-drag capability (think Google Maps).  Another significant change is how you zoom.  Rather than having defined zoom levels, zooming is handled with a sliderbar.  It doesn’t look a whole lot different from the previous toolbar, but the usability is much improved!

dmmonocle

A shout out to the development staff at the UNLV Libraries for making this terrific viewer!

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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Bon Voyage, Anne!

This week, DLS bids farewell to Digital Projects Librarian Anne Shelley, who has accepted the position of assistant librarian with the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota.  Anne started her tenure just last June amid the rising waters of the Iowa River flood.  Listing all of her accomplishments would cause the blog server to crash, so just a couple of highlights…

 She led the Ignaz Pleyel digital collection to fruition, a one-of-a-kind collection of over 200 early editions of Pleyel music scores.  The project required a great deal of coordination and planning, which Anne carried out successfully.

Anne also recorded several tutorials on using the Iowa Digital Library, helping users to navigate the sometimes-tricky interface of IDL. 

Good luck Anne!  We’ll miss you.

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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New arrivals

Congratulations to Jen Wolfe, and welcome to the world, Audrey and Calvin!!!

Born: Sunday, Aug 17th, 10:23 am/10:24 am

 

Calvin James, 6lbs. 13 oz

Audrey Claire, 4lbs. 7oz

 

–Mark F. Anderson

Digital Initiatives Librarian

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New staff member

Digital Library Services welcomes Keo Hoang as its new Digital Initiatives Support Specialist.  Keo comes to DLS from Hardin Library for the Health Sciences and the Information Arcade, and he returns to the third floor of Main Library where he spent several years with Desktop Support.

Keo will be providing support for and supervision of the growing Digital Initiatives Project Room as the department this fall welcomes a new cohort of Digital Librarianship Fellowship Students from the School of Library and Information Science.

He is an avid gardener whose home is included in this year’s Project GREEN Garden Tour.  Welcome, Keo!

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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Happy birthday. Love, Iowa

Looking at the “today in history” webpage from the Associated Press, I saw that today in 1854, the territories of Nebraska and Kansas were established.  There have certainly been jokes made at the expense of our Midwestern neighbors, but instead, a shout out to them on their birthday.  Below is a cartoon by Ding Darling from the Editorial Cartoons digital collection showing a nice gesture between Sioux City and Lincoln (however Omaha doesn’t seem too pleased about being left out):

I’m not entirely sure what the story was about the “Ashland Extension”, but I assume it had to do with extending rail service between the two cities.  Related to this, and on a personal level, I’m excited by the talk of possibly seeing passenger rail service return to Iowa City, with 2 daily trains running to Chicago.  Check out an article by Irving Weber describing the last time this was available:

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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Making tracks at Indy

Just returned from Indianapolis and Midwest Users Group Conference for CONTENTdm, the digital asset management software that we use to power the Iowa Digital Library.  This was the third annual meeting, but really the first year that it’s been truly regional, attendance-wise.  It was really positive to hear how numbers had grown in those three years.  In ’06, there were 30 attendees, and 60 last year.  This year, 101.  It shows a growing user base that will hopefully have a greater influence on the system’s growth and development.  More regional meetings are planned for this year including ones in the southeast and mid-Atlantic.

We received an update from Claire Cocco, CONTENTdm’s product manager on some exciting enhancements to expect later this year, and Glee Willis delivered a great keynote on day two, encouraging digital libraries to stretch the system through customizations in order to best serve information users, showing examples from some of the leaders in the CONTENTdm community.

I particularly enjoyed the University of Louisville’s session on using the MyMaps feature of Google Maps to add overlays as browse interfaces through which to enter cartographic resources in CONTENTdm.  DLS’s own Wendy Robertson spoke at a presentation about workflows for migrating MARC catalog records to CONTENTdm, which was well received by the audience.

I participated on panels discussing digitizing scrapbooks and yearbooks and using CONTENTdm for art collections, and also brought along Jen Wolfe’s eye-catching poster depicting how DLS handles scrapbooks.  Nicole Saylor served on the conference’s planning committee and Brian Thompson attended the meeting as a way to become more familiar with the system and its community of users.  So, LIT was well represented.


There was even talk of an upper-Midwest CONTENTdm users group getting together later this year.  It’s nice to see this kind of organization, but my hope is that CONTENTdm users can maintain a similar level of activity and working together between meetings, perhaps by blowing the dust off the user group wiki, which can help all levels of implementation make the best use of the system.

One of the most beneficial pieces of the meeting was meeting new people and talking about the different ways in which we’re using the system for digital library activities.  We enjoyed some good food and a great record store in downtown Indianapolis (sorry Jen, never made it to Trader Joe’s), but now it’s back to work.

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian

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Campus maps, now with ones and zeros

Anybody who spends more than a few months on a university campus knows how quickly the buildings and landscape can change. For instance, a sidewalk I used to traverse everyday on my way to and from the Main Library while in library school (ca. 2003) is now the Adler Journalism Building. A whole swath of land south of the library across Burlington Street will soon (2010?) be a huge recreation center. (I can’t wait!)For as many changes as there can be in five years, the campus space at The University of Iowa has been documented through maps since its founding in 1847.

The Libraries have completed digitization on nearly 100 campus maps from holdings in the University Archives, which are now available online as the University of Iowa Campus Maps Digital Collection.There are some particularly eye-catching maps in the collection, especially the 1930 campus plan depicting a unified, neoclassical campus that was not exactly finished that way.(The map shows the Main Library in Pentacrest-matching limestone…we got red brick instead.)

Mighty Morphing Power Building

There are maps from every course catalog since 1904, and although they appear extremely similar from one year to the next, subtle difference can hold clues to when a particular building was erected.

 

For example, the photo on the left is a view south from the library of the Law Building (present day Gilmore Hall), and is noted as being taken during the 1900s. Looking at the course catalog maps, 1907-1908 shows the spot from which this picture was taken as a Future Armory and Athletic Pavilion (#20), and 1908-1909 shows the same area as a Proposed Gymnasium (#26), but finally in 1909-1910, the building is labeled as the College of Law. So we know the photograph must have been taken no earlier than 1909.

 

Thanks to DLS Library Assistant Bobby Duncan for his work scanning the maps and building the digital collection.

See the UI News Press Release for more information on the collection.

–Mark F. Anderson
Digital Initiatives Librarian