About 8 P.M. on Saturday evening, it was known that the enemy were falling back

Joseph Culver Letter, July 4, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. 129th Regt. Ills. Vols. Infty.
In the Field 8 miles South West of Marietta,
Ga., July 4th 1864
My Dear Wife

Yours of the 23rd June came to hand yesterday evening, & I am most happy to learn of your good health. All thanks to our Father in Heaven.

About 8 P.M. on Saturday evening [the 2d], it was known that the enemy were falling back, & we were ordered to be in readiness to move at day-light next morning. We moved out on the Marietta road at Sunrise through the enemy’s fortifications. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, July | Comments Off

Sergt. Jim Morrow arrived this morning bringing your letter of the 17th

Joseph Culver Letter, July 1, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols. Inftry.
In the Field Near Marietta, Ga. July 1st 1864
My Dear Wife

Sergt. Jim Morrow arrived this morning bringing your letter of the 17th June and the box of cherries, the latter were all rotten. I am most happy to learn that your health is good. I gave Saml. McGooden his sister’s letter, but have had no opportunity to send to Bro. John [Murphy]. There is a soldier here visiting belonging to the 44th Ills., and I will try & get him to carry the letter & will also send a note by him. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, July | Comments Off

Yours of 21st inst. to Sammy containing love and logwood arrived yesterday

Joseph Culver Letter, June 29, 1864, Page 1Camp near Marietta Ga.
29th June 1864.
My Dear Sister Mollie:

Yours of 21st inst. to Sammy containing love & logwood arrived yesterday evening. Though brief it was very welcome. It’s the first from home in many weeks. Sammy does not need the logwood, having recovered entirely but he can keep it for future use. He is apparently as hearty as ever. I feel “kinder sick like” this morning. Since breakfast, I haven’t had a bit of appetite. Guess the “Spring fever”, so prevalent these warmer days, is “seizing of me.” I wish you would send me a little loaf sugar or orange [peeling?] might cure me. Simptoms in my case are very peculiar. Befor dinner I have a sort of “[gornness?]” in the front part of my waist; and this gives place after dinner, to loss of appetite. In the language of the poet “tis passing strange”. I’m afraid my ailment will become serious if “hardtack” gets scarce. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

I am a little disappointed in not having heard from you

Joseph Culver Letter, June 28, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
In the Field Near Marietta, Ga.
June 28th 1864
My Dear Wife

I am a little disappointed in not having heard from you by yesterday’s mail. Some were recd. from Pontiac of as late a date as the 21st. I presume, however, mine has been sent by Sergt. Jim Morrow, and he has not yet arrived. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

We occupy the same position we have held for the past few days

Joseph Culver Letter, June 25, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
In the Field Near Marietta, Ga.
June 25th 1864
My Dear Wife

We occupy the same position we have held for the past few days. The weather is very warm, but by planting bushes in the ground we manage to keep in the shade & comparatively comfortable. The Enemy’s balls still keep flying over our heads, at times quite close to us. No one has been injured since yesterday morning, & only one in our Regt. since we came here. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

Since I last wrote, we have moved several miles to the right

Joseph Culver Letter, June 22, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
In the Field Near Marietta, Ga., June 22nd 1864
My Dear Wife

Yours of 11th, mailed 13th inst., came to hand yesterday. I am most happy to learn of your good health, may God ever preserve it. Since I last wrote, we have moved several miles to the right. The enemy evacuated their fortifications on Saturday night [the 18th], & on Sunday morning we commenced to move. It rained very hard, and the Streams became swollen so rapidly that it was difficult to pass them. We got into position amidst the rain about 4 P.M. and advanced our line. There was some little Skirmishing, but we moved up and fortified during the night. We had two seriously & two slightly wounded. It continued to rain through the night. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

Yours of June 9th came to hand last night, and I read it this morning

Joseph Culver Letter, June 17, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
Behind the Fortifications, June 17th 1864
My Dear Wife

Yours of June 9th came to hand last night, & I read it this morning. As I may possibly get an opportunity to send a letter to-day, I hasten to write. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

As an opportunity offers to send mail to the rear, I am happy to be able to write

Joseph Culver Letter, June 14, 1864, Page 1

Head Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
In the Field, Near Marietta, Georgia
June 14th 1864
My Dear Wife

As an opportunity offers to send mail to the rear, I am happy to be able to write. We are still lying behind the fortifications on the same line we occupied a week ago. The army has been in motion and fighting, but the centre has not advanced over two miles. We have heard fighting all along the line each day. It has rained almost incessantly for 13 days, so that you can imagine the conditions of the roads, almost impassible. We are still held in readiness to move at a moment’s notice. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

We have advanced our lines over 100 miles through the heart of the Enemy’s country

Joseph Culver Letter, June 10, 1864, Page 1

The first page (or pages) of this letter is (are) missing. [June 10, 1864]

 

I apprehend that for bold, daring, and careful and successful movement, it [Sherman's Atlanta campaign] has never been equaled. We have advanced our lines over 100 miles through the heart of the Enemy’s country, through some of the strongest natural fortifications in this country, in a period of 40 days. To guard a base of supplies from Louisville, Ky. to this place is of itself a herculean task, it being very nearly 500 miles. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off

We have Genl. Inspection at 3 P.M. and as I do not know how long it may last, I hasten to write

Joseph Culver Letter, June 7, 1864, Page 1

Hd. Qurs. Co. “A” 129th Regt. Ills. Vols.
In the Field, Ga., June 7th 1864
My Dear Wife

Your letters of 22d, 25th & 27th have just come to hand with the Sentinel of 20th May, and 3 New York Tribune & 3 Nashville Times, with a letter from Sarah Williams. I have read none but your letters yet, as I am informed we can send our mail at 5 P.M. We have Genl. Inspection at 3 P.M., &, as I do not know how long it may last, I hasten to write before. Continue reading

Posted in 1864, June | Comments Off